U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-05-2012, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,779 posts, read 6,689,578 times
Reputation: 8308

Advertisements

Okay, here is one of the photos I have. What I have is all very similar and not good quality. The photo was taken at least 300 feet away and so the details I observed when the animal was closer and through the binoculars isn't necessarily visible.

ETA: I know I could show photos to Manitoba Conservation, but the term 'conservation' notwithstanding, I am afraid that they might just kill him, whatever he is. I would first like to know what he is, and what his general intentions are. I don't put the odds of his survival here in this rural area at very good anyway - there are a lot of people around with guns.
Attached Thumbnails
How to tell the difference between coyotes and wolves-cropped.jpg  

Last edited by netwit; 05-05-2012 at 10:13 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-06-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
Reputation: 19849
At our annual fair there is always a booth setup for a group that raises money for the protection of wolves.

This state is not known for having wolves, though we do have coyotes.

In conversation with the folks who run that booth, I have been told:
1. our state has laws that make wolf hunting illegal;

2. inter-breeding makes it difficult to immediately identify whether a canine is a wolf or coyote or dog [without DNA testing];

3. it has became common that when coyotes are killed, if they check it's DNA they find that most of them are 50% wolf;

4. because both domestic dogs and coyotes can have wolf DNA, it makes law enforcement protecting wolves very hard to enforce;

5. two years ago our state passed legislation that requires any dog with wolf DNA to have a special registration. They can only be housed in state inspected kennels, and all such dogs are required to be fixed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2012, 12:49 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,147 posts, read 19,303,508 times
Reputation: 25193
looks like a coyote to me and dont take me at my word cause it has been a long time since I lived on land out in the country but i was raised in the country and do know enough to stay away from them and yes keep your dogs away from them too cause they can easily kill a dog even a gsd so please if you love your dog keep him away from it .. I dont think his chances of survival are very good in your area either most of them get killed by farmers with livestock in my area now . oh well just thought I would put my two cents in .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2012, 01:43 PM
 
81 posts, read 131,094 times
Reputation: 125
Pic looks like a coyote to me, but I'm no expert.


Not sure about Canada, but coyotes in the States tend to be a lot bigger in the East than out West.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2012, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,736,591 times
Reputation: 3364
From the pic, looks to me to be a Red Wolf (coywolf hybrid). The ears:head ratio just doesn't seem right for a straight coyote.

If you haven't seen or heard a pack, then chances are high this one won't survive too long on its own... but it could. If it's new and trying to establish territory, you'd be wise to discourage it from hanging around your place and certainly keep your dog away from it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2012, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,786 posts, read 11,271,488 times
Reputation: 19767
I'm voting dog and I believe that this one wants to join your pack. Aloofness is a good initial sign because it indicates a lack of aggression. If your dog won't eat it first you could put a bowl of food out. This guy looks like he hasn't been eating too well. He probably isn't a very good hunter.

The mitochondrial DNA in every dog, even a Maltese or a Pomeranian, is pure wolf. In fact, many biologists now classify the domestic dog as a subspecies of the wolf. I do not think you're going to have any problem if you take this one in. He's been a pet before but has had a bad reception from people lately. Treat him like a lost and frightened dog and he'll get the idea.

Coyotes don't act like this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2012, 05:38 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 20,170,593 times
Reputation: 6227
Too far away to tell as no reference for size and girth. But it appears to be a yote as the headline, tail stance, and belly to leg ratio is all wrong for a wolve out walking.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2012, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,676,066 times
Reputation: 976
That looks an awful lot like a coyote.

As far as size goes, coyotes around here and throughout Saskatchewan tend to stand about 2 feet at the shoulder, up to maybe 2 1/2 feet at the extreme - I'd expect that to hold true through Manitoba as well. Wolves tend to be bigger - 3 to 4 feet at the shoulder. I've also never heard of wolves venturing down much into farm country - how far north are you?

Also, can't see from the picture, but what's the tail look like? Coyotes generally have really big, bushy tails - almost foxlike. They do hold them pointed at the ground a lot, too, even when running.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2012, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,779 posts, read 6,689,578 times
Reputation: 8308
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubblejumper View Post
That looks an awful lot like a coyote.

As far as size goes, coyotes around here and throughout Saskatchewan tend to stand about 2 feet at the shoulder, up to maybe 2 1/2 feet at the extreme - I'd expect that to hold true through Manitoba as well. Wolves tend to be bigger - 3 to 4 feet at the shoulder. I've also never heard of wolves venturing down much into farm country - how far north are you?

Also, can't see from the picture, but what's the tail look like? Coyotes generally have really big, bushy tails - almost foxlike. They do hold them pointed at the ground a lot, too, even when running.
The tail is straight, without any curl in it, looks to be greyish black underneath, not bushy enough to be foxlike but not a thin scrawny tail either. Maybe like a GSD's tail in terms of bushiness. And when running, the tail was horizontal with the body. When walking or trotting, the tail was straight down.

I'm leaning towards coyote. I'm within an hour of the US border, so I'm not far north at all. However, my uncle, a hunter, tells me that wolves have been spotted at a municipal dump that has been closed for years, and which is only about 3 miles from here, and which backs onto bush.

Happy in Wyoming, I really don't think he is a dog based on looking at him through the binoculars, not from the photo. I don't know how to explain that other than I don't think anyone would look at a fox and mistake a fox for a dog and the minute I saw his features through the binoculars, the only thing I was sure of was that he was no dog.

I could be wrong of course, and that's another reason I don't want any hunters out here - I have sympathy for lost dogs. I would take him in in a heartbeat if he is a dog. That's why I called him, and when I see him I make a point in talking quietly, in case he is a dog and is testing whether he trusts me. But in my heart of hearts, that's just not what I saw - I saw a wild animal acting strangely.

Missing All 4 Seasons - I actually do understand why you'd think maybe a red wolf for the reasons you've stated. The ears to body don't look quite right for a coyote, and maybe not rounded enough for a wolf? However, from the research I've done, the red wolves are not around in this area, unless (and this is confusing) that is another name you use for the eastern wolf, which has been shown to have some coyote DNA from way back?

I'm sure I'll get a better photo one of these days and I'll be sure to post it.

Thanks for all your responses.

ETA: I don't know if this behavioural thing will give anyone a clue, but while this animal appears to tolerate my female GSD, he is very leery of my male GSD. I have an underground fence that prevents my male GSD from going onto the field but one day my male GSD was barking madly, and I rushed out to find this strange animal on top of an old straw bale at the outer edge of the field, by the shelterbelt. I don't know if he jumped on it because he was afraid of my male GSD (not knowing that my male GSD couldn't get to him) or if my male GSD spotted him there and then started barking. In any event, I don't know if coyotes or wolves jump on top of things. Or maybe he jumped on top of the bale because that was an advantageous position to fighting my male GSD?

Last edited by netwit; 05-08-2012 at 04:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-08-2012, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,736,591 times
Reputation: 3364
The Eastern Wolf (a.k.a. Eastern Canadian Red Wolf) and the plain ol' Red Wolf are closely related and both appear to be coyote-wolf hybrids. Since the red wolf range is fairly large and increasing, it could be either, but they're fairly similar anyway so why split hairs (or fur in this case )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:25 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top