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Old 05-09-2012, 10:44 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,152 posts, read 19,307,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Tail-wagging can be a sign of being unsure, the fact it has NOT given a little wag or twitch of the tail when around either you or your dog would cause me to pause and seriously consider the situation closer. It means it is very certain of the situation and itself; that is not a good thing when dealing with either a Coyote or Wolf. The problem isn't if your GSD has it's shots up to date, if it tangles with either a Coyote or Wolf, shots will be a moot point. No matter how large your dog is, it WILL come out on the losing end against a wild animal, even one that is smaller.

You live on a farm with firearms... learn how to use one, and don't take a chance with this animal. It doesn't sound like it is afraid of humans and that gets dangerous real fast.
i could not agree more and when I read the part about how he or she did not wag the tail that had me very worried as well cause I know from exp a wolfe or a coyote that is not afraid of a human is a dangerous thing and yes would agree time to start learning how to use a riffle , shot gun what have you . Yes your gsd does not stand a chance against a coyote or a wolf and it will kill your dog in a heartbeat . My malamute i had as a kid did kill a fox and I praise god that he had his rabies shots however a fox is much smaller but just as deadly as a coyote or a wolf . But do stay away and keep your dogs away because now that you said he is not afraid Im more worried for you and your animals . please be careful and do what you have to do to keep yourself and your animals safe . get yourself some gun lessons .
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,435 posts, read 10,048,323 times
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Is it true that coyotes don't form packs? Ever? The reason I ask is because I once saw a "pack" or "herd" or "gathering of coyotes" in Deming New Mexico...running together across a field. Maybe 12 of them. From their smallish size, I'm pretty positive they were 'yotes and not wolves.

Never met a wolf face-to-face, but did meet a coyote while hiking in No. Ca. It was eating an apple and let us approach amazingly close before trotting off. Beautiful eyes...very curious and knowing. Our dog wanted to follow, but luckily, he was leashed....
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Colorado
4,023 posts, read 4,787,129 times
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I'm not sure if they form permanent packs, but I have heard quite a few at one time when they are cornering rabbits, etc......I used to live on a hillside above a lake in S. CA......that is when I learned that rabbits do indeed have 'voices'.......eek!
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,779 posts, read 6,690,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
Are you sure the animal is a "he" and alone? It's the right time of year for both coyotes and wolves to have pups, so you might have a mated pair and a den nearby. The need to feed mom & pups can make wild canids bolder than usual.
Nope, I never got close enough to see if it was male or female . I've been referring to him as a he out of convenience and respect for his arrogance.

The animal shouldn't be hungry - there are a lot of hares around, mice, and there are very large chicken barns dumping the dead chickens in the back of barns. God only knows what the pig barns do with the dead hogs. I would think whatever this animal is, the easy food is what attracted him/her to begin with.

I think he's habituated to people somehow and has realised that people aren't usually a threat to him.

I listened to coyotes howling/yipping on youtube so I would recognize the sound if I heard it and I've never heard anything like that. Only foxes, and that not for a couple of months.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,779 posts, read 6,690,462 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Is it true that coyotes don't form packs? Ever? The reason I ask is because I once saw a "pack" or "herd" or "gathering of coyotes" in Deming New Mexico...running together across a field. Maybe 12 of them. From their smallish size, I'm pretty positive they were 'yotes and not wolves.

Never met a wolf face-to-face, but did meet a coyote while hiking in No. Ca. It was eating an apple and let us approach amazingly close before trotting off. Beautiful eyes...very curious and knowing. Our dog wanted to follow, but luckily, he was leashed....
Coyotes do form packs, usually smaller than wolf packs and the associations between pack members are not as rigid.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,737,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Nope, I never got close enough to see if it was male or female . I've been referring to him as a he out of convenience and respect for his arrogance.

The animal shouldn't be hungry - there are a lot of hares around, mice, and there are very large chicken barns dumping the dead chickens in the back of barns. God only knows what the pig barns do with the dead hogs. I would think whatever this animal is, the easy food is what attracted him/her to begin with.

I think he's habituated to people somehow and has realised that people aren't usually a threat to him.

I listened to coyotes howling/yipping on youtube so I would recognize the sound if I heard it and I've never heard anything like that. Only foxes, and that not for a couple of months.


Yes, if the animal is getting ample free meals from improper disposal of livestock and/or refuse, it has learned that humans mean food. It's not going to leave and it won't be afraid. How to Create a Nuisance Animal 101.
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Old 05-13-2012, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,730 posts, read 5,355,977 times
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Not a coyote. Regardless of what the Wiki article said, no wild coyote ever remotely weighed 75 pounds. Pure coyotes weigh 20-35 on average, and a 40 pounder is considered very large and not common. The larger Eastern coyotes have proven to be wolf/coyote hydrids, Eastern wolf (Canis Lupus Lycaon) with coyotes. Claims to the contrary, the heaviest weighed by a reliable source was around 55 pounds, although there could be a 60 pounder somewhere. As for our unknown canine visitor, my best guess would be a large dog that was dumped and has now gone feral. As others have warned, this animal could prove to be very dangerous and unpredictable. One suggestion; would it be possible to obtain a scat sample of the animal, and if so, would the wildlife authorities be willing to go to the effort and expense of testing for dna, which would determine the species of the animal?
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Old 05-14-2012, 07:06 AM
 
Location: On the Ohio River in Western, KY
3,388 posts, read 5,822,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubblejumper View Post
I just re-read some of your size descriptions from the first post, and I'm thinking it'd be the largest coyote I've ever heard of.

I pulled down the old tracking field guide and it suggests an average length of 2-1/2 inches for a coyote track (front) and 2-1/4 (hind). A 4" track would seem too big to be a coyote. There shouldn't be any way a coyote is making 4" tracks.
Could be a coydog. We normally have coyotes around here that get between the size of border collies and GSD's. The bigger ones are usually always coydogs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
Wolves form packs. Coyotes don't.
Not true.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Not a coyote. Regardless of what the Wiki article said, no wild coyote ever remotely weighed 75 pounds. Pure coyotes weigh 20-35 on average, and a 40 pounder is considered very large and not common.
I have personally shot and killed and skinned coyotes bigger than 40lbs that for all intent purposes were full coyote, and the bigger ones were coydogs.

I guess it's all dependent on the area where you are at. Around here, it's good land, decent temps, and TONS of chicken farms; so it's good living for coyotes and foxes. Heck the biggest fox I have seen was almost 43lbs (where around 30lbs is the high end of average).
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Old 05-14-2012, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,730 posts, read 5,355,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cav Scout wife View Post
Heck the biggest fox I have seen was almost 43lbs (where around 30lbs is the high end of average).
Impossible, this is science fiction. The average male North American red fox, Vulpes Vulpes, weighs between 10 and 12 pounds. A 15 pounder is rare and unusual, and have not been able to find a reliable record of one that reached 20 pounds.

Foxes do get larger in other parts of the world. UK foxes are big, with the average male 14-15 pounds. In the last two years three huge foxes were taken there that caused a sensation among animal experts. The first was 26 pounds, and at the time was believed to be an all time worldwide record. Then earlier this year one was taken that weighed an incredible 35 pounds, and topping that one, a 38 pounder. Note that these were British foxes, not American ones. Our foxes are smaller than are European and Asian foxes. If you like freak monster foxes, take a look at these brutes.
www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1343464/bigest-ever-fox-caught-4ft-cat-killer-trapped-trapped-vet.html

www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4173296/monster-snared-Britains-biggest-fox-weighing-nearly-3s.html
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Old 05-14-2012, 11:29 AM
 
Location: On the Ohio River in Western, KY
3,388 posts, read 5,822,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
Impossible, this is science fiction. The average male North American red fox, Vulpes Vulpes, weighs between 10 and 12 pounds. A 15 pounder is rare and unusual, and have not been able to find a reliable record of one that reached 20 pounds.

On average, adults measure 35–50 cm (14–20 in) high at the shoulder and 45 to 90 cm (18 to 35 in) in body length with tails measuring 30 to 63 in (760 to 1,600 mm). The ears measure 7.7–12.5 cm (3–5 in) and the hind feet 12–18.5 cm (5–7 in). They weigh 2.2 to 14 kg (4.9 to 31 lb), with vixens typically weighing 15–20% less than males.
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