U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-25-2012, 07:42 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,927,056 times
Reputation: 3083

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
i was wrong about the beef but i think its odd that no milk is produced off pasture anywhere in the usa , it must be a cultural thing , buying corn and maize from some other farmer down the road and feeding it to the dairy cows in a barn was always how it was done

i was in argentina around eight years ago on a trip , the climate is not too different to many parts of the usa and they have the same kind of holstien cows yet the cows stay outside eating grass , they are fed maize on a clay bank of sorts aswell but thier is none of this indoor 24 - 7 business
You are right, the vast majority of food production (including milk) in the United States has been industrialized and turned into one inhumane assembly line (chicken, dairy cows, veal...). You can research that yourself. As for the corn, the government subsidizes corn production heavily - most of our processed food is drowned in high fructose corn syrup. Why do you think there are so many obese people around? Children start ingesting it and by the time they are a few years old they start getting all sorts of metabolic syndromes.

In any case, land is expensive here unless you are willing to buy in some place like Nebraska. Most farm land is now rising in prices due to high interest on Wall Street.

I'd say you are about 200 years too late

OD
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-25-2012, 08:13 AM
 
7,309 posts, read 8,169,177 times
Reputation: 4469
Quote:
Originally Posted by ognend View Post
You are right, the vast majority of food production (including milk) in the United States has been industrialized and turned into one inhumane assembly line (chicken, dairy cows, veal...). You can research that yourself. As for the corn, the government subsidizes corn production heavily - most of our processed food is drowned in high fructose corn syrup. Why do you think there are so many obese people around? Children start ingesting it and by the time they are a few years old they start getting all sorts of metabolic syndromes.

In any case, land is expensive here unless you are willing to buy in some place like Nebraska. Most farm land is now rising in prices due to high interest on Wall Street.

I'd say you are about 200 years too late

OD

european farmers recieve subs aswell but farmers in ireland still feed thier dairy cows grass along with concentrates in the milking parlour morning and evening , they eat silage , maize and straw in the winter months inside , its got nothing to do with animal friendly practices however , its just cheaper and more profitable to feed as much grass as possible

in mainland europe , winters are longer so the grass doesnt grow well , the summer is too dry for the grass to grow so cows remain indoors all year round , parts of the usa like oregon and washington state should be temperete enough to suit pasture based dairying however , new zealand is the home of pasture based dairying , i heard of some big company from new zealand which planned to set up a 5000 cow pasture based dairy somewhere in the U.S , i think it was somewhere in texas , hard to believe you could grow grass eight months of the year in such a hot place , perhaps it was further north
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 10:13 AM
 
833 posts, read 1,494,678 times
Reputation: 764
A 5,000 cow pasture bsed dairy would be a logistic nightmare.
There is a reason few grazers are over 100 cows..........logistics !

The 5,000 acres it would take would result in huge distances for the cows to travel twice a day to be milked.

It takes a very efficent milking setup to get 5,000 cows milked in 11 hours ( which would be required with 2x a day milking )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,435,621 times
Reputation: 2415
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf fan View Post
A 5,000 cow pasture bsed dairy would be a logistic nightmare.
There is a reason few grazers are over 100 cows..........logistics !
The only one who tossed out 5,000 acres was me. (and that would be an entire ranch, not a single pasture) But it was in relation to beef cattle, since bob had asked about Angus cattle. Which are beef cattle, not dairy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ognend View Post
In any case, land is expensive here unless you are willing to buy in some place like Nebraska. Most farm land is now rising in prices due to high interest on Wall Street.

I'd say you are about 200 years too late

OD
Nah. Pasture land (which is what the OP is looking for) is still quite a bit cheaper than farm ground. In my area, for example, farm ground can be $2000 an acre. Range, on the other hand, is more like $400.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Burlington, Colorado
347 posts, read 729,611 times
Reputation: 498
Just remember that America is very large and diverse compared to Ireland. You may find land for $8000/acre in Ohio or Illinios, and $1200/acre in western NE or the Texas panhandle, this does not mean that the $1200/ac is a way better deal. It means that due to climate and soils, etc, that the land is more/less productive. Some areas require massive amounts of irrigation. Cattle may need 1 ac/head in Iowa or 100 in southern Arizona.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 12:13 PM
 
833 posts, read 1,494,678 times
Reputation: 764
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
The only one who tossed out 5,000 acres was me. (and that would be an entire ranch, not a single pasture) But it was in relation to beef cattle, since bob had asked about Angus cattle. Which are beef cattle, not dairy.


Nah. Pasture land (which is what the OP is looking for) is still quite a bit cheaper than farm ground. In my area, for example, farm ground can be $2000 an acre. Range, on the other hand, is more like $400.

???????????????????

IrishBob mentioned someone was going to start a -------5,000 acre pasture based DAIRY in the US.

That is what I was responding to in my post immediately after his.

Please try to keep up !
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 12:55 PM
 
7,309 posts, read 8,169,177 times
Reputation: 4469
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf fan View Post
???????????????????

IrishBob mentioned someone was going to start a -------5,000 acre pasture based DAIRY in the US.

That is what I was responding to in my post immediately after his.

Please try to keep up !
in fairness to the poster , i started out talking about angus and then drifted on to an unrelated matter about a 5000 cow dairy investment i read about somewhere

yes , i can appreciate that their is quite a wide variation in the price of land , beit due to quality and of course location , even in little ireland , farmland close to the cities is much more expensive than land in remote areas along the western seaboard which is only usefull for sheep

ive relatives in BC canada so washington state would be attractive , i also dont like hot weather and the washington state climate is comparable to ireland only not just as wet from what ive heard

i looked up that website ( thank you jetgraphics ) which features land and farms for sale , plenty of very nice farms in the north west which appear reasonabley priced , the idea of buying a 250 acre farm over here is fantasy , they just dont come up for sale
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 01:02 PM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,894,325 times
Reputation: 11471
You could have a cattle feed lot in Michigan with 100 acres.

All they need is a run in shed in the winter.

Of course, you will need to feed them corn and hay.

Most around me feed silage.

Tax write offs for this are 100%.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 02:18 PM
 
7,309 posts, read 8,169,177 times
Reputation: 4469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
You could have a cattle feed lot in Michigan with 100 acres.

All they need is a run in shed in the winter.

Of course, you will need to feed them corn and hay.

Most around me feed silage.

Tax write offs for this are 100%.
feed lots are alien and dont really appeal to me

i plant to make a trip to see my relatives in BC fairly soon and might head across to washington or maybe oregon , thier are other places which might be more suitable but the north west seems the obvious choice
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
7,092 posts, read 11,404,349 times
Reputation: 7148
Finding a dairy farm to buy is not your problem - immigrating is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top