U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-26-2012, 04:56 AM
 
4,875 posts, read 3,176,769 times
Reputation: 2679

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf fan View Post
Since it takes OVER an acre per cow ( of even excellent pasture ) a 5,000 cow pasture based dairy certainly would translate to more than 5,000 acres of pasture.

Try to keep up !
in ireland , a 100 acres would be more than enough land to keep 100 cows , from around late april to late august , 60 acres would be enough
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-26-2012, 07:23 AM
 
833 posts, read 712,977 times
Reputation: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
Any good dairy operation will supplement with hay and silage.
Every rotational dairy grazer that I know of relies on pasture with the supplementing being done with grain ( corn) at milking time

I once had a 62 lb per day milk average with my Jersey cows with only lush pasture and a scoop of grain at each milking.

Even my DHIA milk tester was impressed.

Plese tell us about your experience with grazing dairy cattle ( sarc )

Last edited by redwolf fan; 05-26-2012 at 07:47 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2012, 09:07 AM
 
22,274 posts, read 17,441,633 times
Reputation: 9052
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf fan View Post
Every rotational dairy grazer that I know of relies on pasture with the supplementing being done with grain ( corn) at milking time

I once had a 62 lb per day milk average with my Jersey cows with only lush pasture and a scoop of grain at each milking.

Even my DHIA milk tester was impressed.

Plese tell us about your experience with grazing dairy cattle ( sarc )
Hey.....I drink milk....

We drill water wells for farmers......I have been around at many points of the day.

Read my post again....we said nearly the same thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2012, 01:11 PM
 
4,875 posts, read 3,176,769 times
Reputation: 2679
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf fan View Post
Every rotational dairy grazer that I know of relies on pasture with the supplementing being done with grain ( corn) at milking time

I once had a 62 lb per day milk average with my Jersey cows with only lush pasture and a scoop of grain at each milking.

Even my DHIA milk tester was impressed.

Plese tell us about your experience with grazing dairy cattle ( sarc )

is rotational grazing more common on dairy farms which keep jerseys in the u.s ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2012, 01:31 PM
 
833 posts, read 712,977 times
Reputation: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
is rotational grazing more common on dairy farms which keep jerseys in the u.s ?

Although colored breeds are more popular in rotational grazing systems, there are Holstein herds doing it also.

My son has about 40 Holsteins and 30 Jerseys in his rotational grazing herd.

It appears the colored breeds can withstand the heat in the pasture better than Holsteins.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2012, 02:42 PM
 
Location: southwest Nebraska and northwest Kansas
2,185 posts, read 3,009,531 times
Reputation: 1550
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf fan View Post
Since it takes OVER an acre per cow ( of even excellent pasture ) a 5,000 cow pasture based dairy certainly would translate to more than 5,000 acres of pasture.

Try to keep up !
You're just determined to be snide, aren't you? I never quite know what to do with people like you...




To AUMs, that is completely dependent upon where you are in the country.

Going with a nice, easy plenty-of-rainfall ratio of one to one, and assuming you grow your own forage, that would indeed be 5000 acres for 5000.

However, no one in their right mind would have their entire place consist of a single pasture. (which is what your original post suggested with the "huge distances")
How would you grow hay? How would you rotate? And I'm not even talking intensive grazing rotation but simple things like summer pasture, winter pasture, calving pasture, etc.

And this is even before you get into the fact that a 5000 head pasture-based dairy probably supplements heavily with hay...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2012, 02:50 PM
 
Location: southwest Nebraska and northwest Kansas
2,185 posts, read 3,009,531 times
Reputation: 1550
bob, what are you planning? A dairy or a ranch? Because Angus cattle, as mentioned several times, are not a dairy breed. They are a beef breed. In fact, the BEST beef breed in my opinion, not that I'm biased or anything. (That's what my cattle are, btw ).

However you keep talking dairies, also.


You are talking two completely different industries...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2012, 02:57 PM
 
833 posts, read 712,977 times
Reputation: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
bob, what are you planning? A dairy or a ranch? Because Angus cattle, as mentioned several times, are not a dairy breed. They are a beef breed. In fact, the BEST beef breed in my opinion, not that I'm biased or anything. (That's what my cattle are, btw ).

However you keep talking dairies, also.


You are talking two completely different industries...

I agree wholeheartedly with your last sentence.
A dairy grazer needs a much different pasture system that is intensively managed in order for a dairy to be profitable.

Comparing beef grazing and dairy grazing is apples to oranges.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2012, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
75,259 posts, read 36,424,032 times
Reputation: 18302
Beef and dairy ? Limited acreage ?
Dexters would fit the bill (beef and dairy) and their smaller size means less acreage needed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2012, 08:47 AM
 
4,875 posts, read 3,176,769 times
Reputation: 2679
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
bob, what are you planning? A dairy or a ranch? Because Angus cattle, as mentioned several times, are not a dairy breed. They are a beef breed. In fact, the BEST beef breed in my opinion, not that I'm biased or anything. (That's what my cattle are, btw ).

However you keep talking dairies, also.


You are talking two completely different industries...
my posts were messy , i admit that , i drifted into a discussion about dairy farming in the usa

i know that angus are a beef breed , im not interested in buying a dairy farm anywhere , i just enjoy discussing it with farmers from other countries , i grew up on a dairy farm , my brother is a dairy farmer

angus are more dominant on north american , australia and south american farms than in europe , angus is still popular in ireland , the uk and europe but less so than the much larger french beef breeds like charoloais , limousin etc

buying a farm to raise angus cattle in the usa might be fantasy but i do like the idea of keeping a couple of hundred head somewhere , hard to do in a country like ireland where farms are small and rarely get sold
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top