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Old 05-27-2012, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,435,621 times
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Gotcha!

Angus (specifically black Angus) are indeed dominant in the big, beef producing countries. I honestly don't know why. I mean they are a durable, compact, efficient breed, but I'm not sure that actually makes them the best... We have them because black is what sells.

And no, it's not a fantasy if you have the money. Pacific northwest might be out of your price-range just because it's a popular area. But it might not be...
And that would be an area where a one cow/acre ratio would probably be about right. But there are great places to raise cattle all over the US. Many, undoubtedly, with range prices cheaper than you'll find in the NW. However, being from Ireland, I can see why that would be where you're aiming.

I hope you can find something!

PS: My brother and sis-in-law, two prairie kids from Nebraska btw, recently moved back to the States after a 5 year stint in Dublin. (He works for Google) They absolutely LOVED it over there.
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Old 05-27-2012, 09:29 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,927,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Gotcha!

Angus (specifically black Angus) are indeed dominant in the big, beef producing countries. I honestly don't know why. I mean they are a durable, compact, efficient breed, but I'm not sure that actually makes them the best... We have them because black is what sells.

And no, it's not a fantasy if you have the money. Pacific northwest might be out of your price-range just because it's a popular area. But it might not be...
And that would be an area where a one cow/acre ratio would probably be about right. But there are great places to raise cattle all over the US. Many, undoubtedly, with range prices cheaper than you'll find in the NW. However, being from Ireland, I can see why that would be where you're aiming.

I hope you can find something!

PS: My brother and sis-in-law, two prairie kids from Nebraska btw, recently moved back to the States after a 5 year stint in Dublin. (He works for Google) They absolutely LOVED it over there.
I think you can find a lot of Brangus in Florida, it is a mix between the Brahman and the Angus. Brahman cattle were smaller and significantly more adapted to the life in the Florida shrub.

Ya know, a few of the largest (by size of acreage) cattle ranches are in Florida (a little known fact)

OD
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Old 05-27-2012, 11:03 AM
 
5,879 posts, read 5,360,500 times
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I've been wondering (along with everyone else, probably) how you're going to swing the whole immigration thing. Getting even a green card is pretty hard these days. So your whole idea may well be a pipe dream.

It would be fun to travel around the US looking at a variety of ranches, though. Maybe if you contacted the state Extension offices or Cattlemen's Associations they could connect you with some ranches of the size you're interested in - then you could talk to people who really know about the locations and types of cattle you're intersted in. Here's Washington : *WSU Extension WCA Home

When you're looking, take a look at Idaho, too. Nice ranch land there, and maybe (?) cheaper than Washington.
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Old 05-27-2012, 11:17 AM
 
833 posts, read 1,494,678 times
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( regarding beef breeds in the US)

About 50 years ago, Hereford was #1 with angus a distant #2,

In the late 60's and early 70's the big INEFFICENT French breeds started to really take hold.
I said back then it was a fad and history proved me right.

I believe the Angus breed was more aggressive in breeding better traits into their breeding stock and the Hereford breed got passed up.
Also, pink eye and cancer eye has been a problem for Herefords and Angus reduces/eliminates that.

Still hard to beat the black baldy ( Hereford x Angus cross )
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Old 05-27-2012, 12:53 PM
 
7,309 posts, read 8,169,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf fan View Post
( regarding beef breeds in the US)

About 50 years ago, Hereford was #1 with angus a distant #2,

In the late 60's and early 70's the big INEFFICENT French breeds started to really take hold.
I said back then it was a fad and history proved me right.

I believe the Angus breed was more aggressive in breeding better traits into their breeding stock and the Hereford breed got passed up.
Also, pink eye and cancer eye has been a problem for Herefords and Angus reduces/eliminates that.

Still hard to beat the black baldy ( Hereford x Angus cross )

hereford and angus are common over here too , i find it funny to hear posters refer to black angus , you might aswell refer to wet water over here as angus are exclusivley black in theese parts , as such they are not refered to as black angus

Irish Charolais Cattle Society

interesting how the large european breeds never caught on in the usa , charolais is by far the most popular beef breed in ireland , followed by limousin

http://www.irishlimousin.com/


i perfer angus myself as they are tougher , angus meat also commands a premium price here , angus meat is tastier than that of other breeds
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Old 05-27-2012, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 5,435,621 times
Reputation: 2415
Angus also comes in red, hence the reference to "black" Angus. And, for whatever reason, red isn't nearly as popular as black. Nor does it sell as high.

To their popularity, I think it's advertising by the Angus producers more than anything. Restaurants, for example, like to advertise that they have "Angus beef!" Which of course drives the price of black cattle higher, (even when they're NOT Angus. lol )
And if you can taste the difference between the breeds, you have a far more refined palate than I. I've been in this business my entire life and have never been able to tell the difference between breeds when it comes to a steak. I can tell the difference in how it was finished (grass finished, grain finished 30 day, grain finished 60...) but that's about it.

Last edited by itsMeFred; 05-27-2012 at 01:47 PM..
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Old 05-27-2012, 02:09 PM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,894,325 times
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American Angus Association

Some might enjoy this site.

I think red angus are confused with herefords at times.

A farmer in our township has red angus.
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Old 05-27-2012, 02:37 PM
 
833 posts, read 1,494,678 times
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Red angus are entirely red

Herefords have a whiteface
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Old 05-27-2012, 02:56 PM
 
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Irish Hereford Breed Society

Irish Angus Cattle Society | Home


hereford calves command a higher price than angus over here , interesting comment earlier about how angus has over taken hereford in the u.s
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Old 05-27-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,539,972 times
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irish_bob, have you considered Dexter cattle?

1) They are Irish

2) They are a multipurpose breed; i.e., milk (with a higher butterfat content than Guernsey or Jersey) and beef. The meat is a finer grain... and BTW, Gordon Ramsey thinks Dexters produce finer beef than even Angus. Of course he could be prejudiced...

3) They are smaller and more easily handled than the larger beef or milk cattle. Bulls average about 1000 lbs, cows about 750.

4)They eat less than half of the larger breeds, yet bulk up nicely. They also will eat what many other breeds refuse to touch in a grass environment.

5) Because Angus are bred primarily to bulk up quickly on grass, there is a frequent problem with pulling calves from first-time cows. Breeding them for the first time with a Dexter can help them to adjust to the stress of birthing calves in the future, particularly if the heifer-to-cow has not reached her full growth yet.

OK I admit it - I am into Dexters. Started learning about them 6 years ago on another forum, bought my own bull and two cows ('long-leg' - not chondrodysplasia) three years ago, and am already working on a small herd. They are more "family cows" than the large herds of beef cattle they raise out here where ItsMeFred and I live. The locals call my "little acreage" - 60 acres - "The Petting Zoo", because neighbors and even their visiting relatives come up and 'pet' the cows. This does not happen normally on large beef cattle ranches; children who have no experience with cows can learn on the smaller Dexters. We had a young lady last year who had never been on a farm other than her grandparents', for visits, who raised one of our steered calves for 4-H and showed him. He took two blue ribbons, even though he was smaller than everyone else there... it helped with her self-confidence and even now she comes out to lead him around.

There are Herefords and even some Charolais out here; but primarily, the production is Angus for beef.

If you were interested, and particularly interested in bringing over a 'new' bull to enhance the current American lines, you might find some support from the American Dexter Cattle Association. Dexter Cattle For Sale Dexter Cattle Breeder

Just a thought.

Last edited by SCGranny; 05-27-2012 at 05:23 PM..
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