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Old 10-13-2012, 10:27 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,926,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
If a person knowingly buys a house in the middle of a pig farm, they have no business complaining there's a pig farm around them. It was there when they bought it and they knew about it.
I agree. However, it is never that simple. Usually there are promises involved (never in written form), "insider" info on the farm next door etc. People often fall for that and will never get anything in writing from the real estate agent or developer. Most often we are talking large subdivision next to pig farm, not an isolated McMansion causing trouble. When enough people spend money on the subdivision, it is strength in numbers. After all - they are not doing anything illegal.

OD
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Old 10-14-2012, 06:44 AM
 
6,368 posts, read 14,143,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
If a person knowingly buys a house in the middle of a pig farm, they have no business complaining there's a pig farm around them. It was there when they bought it and they knew about it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ognend View Post
I agree. However, it is never that simple. Usually there are promises involved (never in written form), "insider" info on the farm next door etc. People often fall for that and will never get anything in writing from the real estate agent or developer. Most often we are talking large subdivision next to pig farm, not an isolated McMansion causing trouble. When enough people spend money on the subdivision, it is strength in numbers. After all - they are not doing anything illegal.

OD
It is always that simple or did they hide the pigs and spray Febreeze every time they showed the property?

"When enough people spend money on the subdivision, it is strength in numbers. After all - they are not doing anything illegal." - and neither is the pig farmer. Wasn't he there first?

Did you happen to buy property next to a pig farm?
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:54 AM
 
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If only someone had once said that about Denver...
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Old 10-15-2012, 08:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gimme3steps View Post
It is always that simple or did they hide the pigs and spray Febreeze every time they showed the property?

"When enough people spend money on the subdivision, it is strength in numbers. After all - they are not doing anything illegal." - and neither is the pig farmer. Wasn't he there first?

Did you happen to buy property next to a pig farm?
I do my research thank you.

However, I can tell you that once (when I was younger) I was buying a house in an unincorporated area in Florida - the lots were only a few acres in size. After nine months of looking, my wife and I saw one house and loved it. Luckily, when we were there one of the neighbors fired up his "dune buggy" - a diesel guzzling, fume spitting, loud as hell monster that he worked on for a while when we were there (the fence was tall, you could not see over it and we just got lucky it was the day he decided to work on it). Imagine buying a house and not knowing that fact. Or one time we were looking at a 10 acre rural place in Texas - that day there was an LEO event on a nearby rifle range (as we found out later) - it was a constant barrage of gunfire. Of course, I would not buy a place without looking at it numerous times but most people don't do that! At most they will come back to see it twice!

As for the pig farm above - you don't know what the realtor or the developer told the people about it, without putting anything down on paper. Most people are willing to go to great lengths to protect their investment. For someone who really likes the place an off-the-cuff remark such as "don't worry about them, they are going out of business" will suffice. I am not saying you are smart to believe such a remark but a lot of people will.

I recommend this book (Finding & Buying Your Place in the Country: Les & Carol Scher,Carol Scher: 9780793141098: Amazon.com: Books) to everyone looking for a home in the country. However, how many people read a book before looking for a place??

OD
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Old 10-15-2012, 08:37 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,458 posts, read 43,307,926 times
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Which is why people who have spent their entire lives in urban areas ought to stay there (job transfers excepted). What I've found out about most rural pioneers is that they're in love with the idea of living in the country without realizing what living in the country actually means and entails.
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Which is why people who have spent their entire lives in urban areas ought to stay there (job transfers excepted). What I've found out about most rural pioneers is that they're in love with the idea of living in the country without realizing what living in the country actually means and entails.
Living in the country on a 15,000 acre used-to-be-a-working-cattle-ranch-but-now-it-is-a-subdivision-of-large-acreage-tracts-with-bridle-paths-and-hiking-opportunities has nothing to do with your farmer tending pigs and cattle. Most new developments in the "country" are intended for well to do folks as second homes and the occasional retirement spot.

Most places my wife and I looked at in New Mexico, for example, were 20-40,000 acre ranches where you can buy a 20-40-60-160 acre spread, had very strong protective covenants, only 10-20% of the ranch was developed in these lots, the rest was intended as a common area for horseback riding, biking and hiking, no shooting, no ATVs, no farm animals (only horses or a few cows but no pigs) etc. Similar situation in SW Texas. Who do you think this kind of a property was advertised to? Or the property that has the class V dark skies? Some land-rich, cash-poor farmer? Some redneck hunter in Tennessee? Or your well-to-do person from the city?

ALL (and I mean ALL) lot owners were from north-east or California and a few from a few other states, most were second homes (all worth $400K and up) and only a few lots/houses actually had people living in them full-time, they were all well-to-do and over 60, 95% retirees. Some of the lots got bought up and sold due to divorces before the house was even finished.

I remember one place, there were quite a few people that moved from North East into a development like I describe near a small town in NM. These people like any other become a part of the town, for better or worse. The first thing they got involved in was building a town animal shelter. The locals didn't like it, it was all "north east" style, "we don;t need no stinkin' shelter", "go back to the city" and blah blah blah. However, fact of the matter is that a lot of these poor small towns have a lot of backwards people who mistreat their animals - I see it here where I live every day. These people justify their stupidity by saying "I am a rancher, this is how we do it". Well, sorry but if you buy a goat and it breaks out its pen because you are too lazy to fix it and then it gets torn up by your dogs and you let it wander around with a broken leg with exposed ligaments and are too cheap to spend money on a veterinarian and you excuse that with "I am a rancher, we don't spend money on goats" - well, that's just plain stupid and cruel and you need to be held accountable. At the least, there should be a shelter to protect the innocent from you.

Anyways, nowadays you have a choice: either you can move to a lot of land in the middle of nowhere, pay less and take a chance on your neighbors - dirty, drunken slob on an ATV with a shotgun in his hand and a dog in the truck bed or a nice, clean cut, clean shaven farmer? What are your chances? Or you can buy an expensive lot on a large development that has the covenants to protect you from all the redneck inconsiderates.

I am not saying it is always either-or but sadly, it has become more frequently so. A mistake you make can cost you dearly, rob you of years of your life and your bank account etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Which is why people who have spent their entire lives in urban areas ought to stay there (job transfers excepted). What I've found out about most rural pioneers is that they're in love with the idea of living in the country without realizing what living in the country actually means and entails.
Your IDEA of the country may be completely different than mine. Mine may be a life on a 100 acre lot next to a national forest where I can ride my horse, enjoy the piece and quiet and just be away from people. It certainly is NOT an idea of rabid hunters shooting all night and day, people on ATVs raping Mother Nature loudly, covered in gasoline fumes. it is definitely NOT the idea of someone's 6 hunting dogs running loose and entering my property to chase my horses or chickens or whatever. Also not shot up stop traffic signs, garbage disposal site in the middle of the forest etc. It all happens because people are people, there will always be good ones and always be stupid ones - no amount of research can guarantee it will all be good.

OD

Last edited by ognend; 10-15-2012 at 09:11 PM..
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Old 10-16-2012, 04:02 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,458 posts, read 43,307,926 times
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As I said, you then have no clue about rural living. If the above is your attitude, especially about the people, I understand why your new neighbors don't like you and wish you'd move back to wherever.
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
2,311 posts, read 3,667,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
As I said, you then have no clue about rural living. If the above is your attitude, especially about the people, I understand why your new neighbors don't like you and wish you'd move back to wherever.

I fully agree. Living in Helena Montana for 14 years showed me the type all too well.
Luckily Montana is much more brutal in it's weather than New Mexico taking all but the hardiest transplants out of state within a couple of winters.

Sadly you have the ultra wealthy that carve up the land and put a million dollar plus home on their 100 acres and think they are really rural. LOL!!

This does nothing but raise the property taxes of those that are indigenous to the immediate area, thus forcing them off the land that had been in their family for generations.

Long live the drunk, redneck SUV riding local for he/she does more in keeping their areas clean of the wealthy than anything else barring the weather,
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Old 10-16-2012, 08:24 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,926,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
As I said, you then have no clue about rural living. If the above is your attitude, especially about the people, I understand why your new neighbors don't like you and wish you'd move back to wherever.
My friend, we are discussing here who moves to rural areas and why. Doesn't mean I am like that, I am just sharing my experiences of what is being sold to city folks and how it is advertised (by your fellow local developer family that owns half the small town). And yes, moving to a rural place can end up in a very rough experience - depending on where you moved you can have all of the bad stuff I said and worse. You can also be perfectly fine and everything can be great, from neighbors to weather to everything else.

A lot of rural areas in United states are populated with trash rednecks whose only goal in life after you move in will be to show you how redneck they can be. This will include trashing your property, riding ATVs on it, dumping garbage next to it, being loud and obnoxious and being a general nuisance.

You can also end up in a place where your neighbors are 4th generation german farmers whose every inch of their fields looks amazing, clean, they are quiet and welcoming and being around them is just a joy. In my opinion, the latter is rarer than the former. Your mileage might vary.

A lot of people make the mistake of thinking that a rural place is like a European village where farmers are educated and you can hear Beethoven out of the farmer's window. Heck, a lot of people make the mistake that rural people farm and ranch! (only 2.5% of US population farms). Not in United States. Our culture is completely different. A lot of people here are surprised that a lot of tiny towns across the country have "projects" and are drowning in drugs (meth) and crime. Go to a small mountain town in NC with population 850 - has a crime/drug problem proportional to a large city. Similar in NM, MO, FL or really anywhere across the country.

OD
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Old 10-16-2012, 08:32 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,967,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by julian17033 View Post
Long live the drunk, redneck SUV riding local for he/she does more in keeping their areas clean of the wealthy than anything else barring the weather,
Hear! hear!
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