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Old 10-19-2012, 06:37 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,925,712 times
Reputation: 3083

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
I spent 18 years growing up in a rural environment, and I now live in the city. I love the country, the animals and the people. I wouldn't trade my life growing up for anything because the values I gained in rural living will serve me for the rest of my life. The funny thing is that I love urban living now, and all the great things that come with it.

Hearing people say things like "dumb hicks" or "IQ less than 75" leads me to believe that people aren't aware of how they're socializing with the local people that they're moving near. I get the fact that people say harsh things when they're upset, but empathy must prevail, even if it's to build the foundation of a constructive conversation. People riding ATVs, trespassing, etc. are annoying, but by building some relationships and negotiating, you can usually prevail (with diligence). Having spent lots of time hunting in my youth, I can say that getting to know some of the farmers and offering help is probably the best thing you can do...and it's rewarding because farm work is humbling and fulfilling (at least to me).

In any event, rural living isn't for everyone. I can say I detest sub-divisions being built in the middle of no where. As others have echoed, the people who remain in the area are often times not the ones who sell. That sold land raises taxes and COL, moving farmers out; and farmers are the best of the best. As a society, I would love it if people were more appreciative of farmers and rural lifestyle in general. There are inconsiderate/rude people everywhere, but even rude people can be befriended with some respect and diligence.
Good post. Generally we agree. However, the topic of this thread is:

"We don't want no highfalutin' city-folk comin' here"

Highfalutin
Adjective:
(esp. of speech, writing, or ideas) Pompous or pretentious

In its name it has two negative connotations: one is that city-folk are pompous and two is that we don't want them here. It is offensive to begin with, as offensive as someone talking about the opposite - the drunken redneck riding an ATV shooting traffic signs.

As usual, the truth is somewhere in the middle...

OD
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Old 10-23-2012, 05:51 PM
 
91 posts, read 243,164 times
Reputation: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
That being the key sentence he used. Hunters are notorious for trespassing on other peoples land to hunt. I grew up in a rural town, with a cemetery next door. They'd always park in the back of the cemetery and walk back on to our land. Course they didn't notice we could see them doing so...

So I'd just go out back for awhile for some target practice...

I did get a bow once. A nice hunting one. While walking towards the back the hunter took off running from my dog and left his bow behind. My hunting stand also came from another hunter that decided to setup on our land without permission.
Not all hunters do that though. I know many people that follow all the laws, there are a few rotten apples though.
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Old 10-23-2012, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,404,041 times
Reputation: 23066
Quote:
Originally Posted by ognend View Post
Good post. Generally we agree. However, the topic of this thread is:

"We don't want no highfalutin' city-folk comin' here"

Highfalutin
Adjective:
(esp. of speech, writing, or ideas) Pompous or pretentious

In its name it has two negative connotations: one is that city-folk are pompous and two is that we don't want them here. It is offensive to begin with, as offensive as someone talking about the opposite - the drunken redneck riding an ATV shooting traffic signs.

As usual, the truth is somewhere in the middle...

OD
Or, it could be read the way I did, which is that of the city folk that move to the country, it's the high-falutin', we're better than country folks and our city ways are the only ways type of city folk that are unwelcome. The rest of them are fine and dandy.

Whether or not that would be offensive to begin with would depend, I guess, on which category you personally fall into.
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:10 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,925,712 times
Reputation: 3083
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Or, it could be read the way I did, which is that of the city folk that move to the country, it's the high-falutin', we're better than country folks and our city ways are the only ways type of city folk that are unwelcome. The rest of them are fine and dandy.

Whether or not that would be offensive to begin with would depend, I guess, on which category you personally fall into.
And the same goes for the opposite. If you are not the drunken redneck on the ATV shooting around wherever you please, trespassing and cutting fences, why get offended?

OD
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,404,041 times
Reputation: 23066
Well, I don't, as it happens. I do, however, being both a city girl and a country girl at different times in my life, recognize the high-falutin' city folk in action, whether it be in the flesh or online. They do stand out.
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Old 10-24-2012, 07:09 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,925,712 times
Reputation: 3083
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Well, I don't, as it happens. I do, however, being both a city girl and a country girl at different times in my life, recognize the high-falutin' city folk in action, whether it be in the flesh or online. They do stand out.
Hey, there are different people all over. I live in a small town and I occasionally get the idiot who moved from Houston and thinks they own the place, they tail you while driving (even though you are already going above speed limit) just like they are on I-10 or 610 or whatever the heck their big road is there. Or the moron from Austin who is all about "energy", "vortexes" and "peace". They want everything paved in asphalt etc. etc.

However, I also get the local idiot who is barely going in his beater 20 mph below the limit, has 8 horses in his/her 2 acre backyard, a goat whose leg has been broken by his own dogs two weeks ago but he doesn't believe in spending money on a "stupid" goat and he doesn't mind watching her suffer day in and day out (hey, he is a "rancher folk"!).

You can spot both kinds from an airplane.

Then there are the rest of us along the spectrum. The guy who retired from the city, the nice farmer whose 4 generations have been here, the real estate agent lady who can't wait to sell a rural property to a city folk and then talk on the Internet about how high-falootin' these suckers may be....

OD
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Old 10-24-2012, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,111,296 times
Reputation: 24642
High falutin' city folk can be pretty obnoxious in the high falutin' city as well. Just as drunken redneck crazies can be to thier country neighbors.
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Old 10-24-2012, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,404,041 times
Reputation: 23066
ognend, you seem to have a really personal issue with folks who sell property to city folk without making sure that the city folk do their due diligence.

As for me, I make sure that anyone looking to move to the country has a clue before they do so. There's a lovely brochure that a friend on an equine list wrote up after many long discussions about citiots who move to the country and then object to everything about it and insist that their ideas are inevitably superior and everything should be changed to be more like it is in the city. It, in a very friendly fashion, deals with most of the things that people new to country living should consider and how not to be thought a citiot once you've moved there. She's given permission for it to be reproduced and handed out by real estate agents who deal in country properties. There's another brochure put out by a county with a similar purpose, for those folks considering moving to the country where agriculture is still active, pointing out that farming is a right and protected by law in such areas and what kinds of things someone moving next to a farm might encounter that are protected activities. It even has a scratch and sniff for those who are unfamiliar with the aroma of manure. There's LOTS of information available out there, for agents to pass out or for the general public looking to move to the country, if one wants to do their own due diligence or to help a client do so.

If you got burned in moving to the country, either because of lack of doing your own due diligence or because you somehow had it in your head that you've "fix it" once you moved there and for some unfathomable reason weren't appreciated by the locals you were going to "help", I'm sorry. But it sure does seem that something like that has soured your viewpoint.
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Old 10-24-2012, 02:31 PM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,925,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
ognend, you seem to have a really personal issue with folks who sell property to city folk without making sure that the city folk do their due diligence.
I actually do. I despise real estate agents, I think they are unfairly paid insane amounts of money for basically being a "database on legs". The only way I used a RE is to open the door. I am pretty sure not all REAs are crooks and liars but a vast majority of them are, just my experience and opinion. To be an RE all it takes is a functioning vehicle and a pulse. In the RE boom everything with a pulse made money by being an REA. If you want to see the nicest homes in an area, look up an REA, chances are they live in one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
As for me, I make sure that anyone looking to move to the country has a clue before they do so.
We are not talking about you

By the way, I like the word "citiot". Shows a lot of respect and a real humble attitude on your side (and the side of the rural folk using it). I am sure it invites similar feelings on the side of the people who move into YOUR ('cause you know, it is YOURS) area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
If you got burned in moving to the country, either because of lack of doing your own due diligence or because you somehow had it in your head that you've "fix it" once you moved there and for some unfathomable reason weren't appreciated by the locals you were going to "help", I'm sorry. But it sure does seem that something like that has soured your viewpoint.
Nope, I am enjoying my "rural" life. It is not rural enough for me though (too many Houstonites and Austinites descending on this little town, asphalting everything in sight, sitting on town council, regulating everything, too many subdivisions and 2nd homes, this is the busiest little town of 2600 people you have ever seen!).

Ideally I would find a place where rural folk are like in Europe, small, quaint villages with REAL farmers and REAL ranchers, neat properties that show "pride of ownership" (no, I don't mean a 2 acre "ranchette" ). I am sure there are places like that in this country (Happy in Wyoming mentioned WY). I have seen parts of, for example, New Braunfels, TX that looked like that (area populated by old German farmer descendants) but NB is a city of 50,000 people now and even these old farmers are selling their lands to go elsewhere or retire, sadly. Ft. Davis TX looked neat and quiet (the brief time I was there).

My idea of a bad rural area would be many rural towns and places in LA, MS, AL, large parts of Florida (with some exceptions), TN, MO, KY etc. where the barefoot, coon-eating, squirrel chumming, ATV riding loud redneck seems to be the norm. Even though I am sure there are a lot of good people living there, it seems like it is also densely populated with bad people with no manners. Apologies to anyone who lives in the abovementioned places and knows it to be opposite, I am sure there are gems but acknowledge that I am not the authority on this nor have I been everywhere. Finally, I am sure there are great little towns in North East, if you have the dough and can stand the weather

Maybe Canada is the place for me, people there seem to be much quieter.

OD
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Old 10-24-2012, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,404,041 times
Reputation: 23066
Where I live, some 45 miles from Austin, I'm surrounded by working farms and ranches owned and worked by good people who are the antithesis of what you describe. Though of late there are folks moving out here that are apparently afraid of the dark (there goes the Milky Way!) and the occasional five or ten acre "ranchette", as you call them, though they do have actual cows and horses and donkeys and goats, etc., etc. It's amazing what you can grow on 5 acres, you can even actually produce sufficient to have a commercial operation selling at farmers' markets or to restaurants, if you do it right. I've also known people to have horses on two acres, purchasing horses at auction and rehabbing them and finding them good homes. But, of course, it does take knowing what you're doing and actually working it. I would be the last person to denigrate someone who's managing to accomplish that just because of the size of their "spread". The people here who've lived on and worked the land for three or four generations or more don't denigrate that, either - they KNOW what it takes.
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