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Old 08-30-2012, 08:08 PM
 
35,108 posts, read 41,314,585 times
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I think the biggest problem is those who are used to living in a city go to the country and want to bring the city with them and that is what causes the issue. If you love the city then stay there don't go to the country and then whine because it is quiet except for the hunters and 4X4's running around and please don't ask where the hook up for the city sewer and water is because there is none. It is septic tank and propane, don't like it then go back to the city. Those who were raised in the country generally don't move to the city and try to get approval for a pig farm or a cattle ranch because they want noise, pollution and traffic, they keep themselves and their farm animals on the farm along with the peace and tranquility of the country.
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Old 08-31-2012, 09:21 PM
 
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Some urbanites move to the country and expect the same amenities available in the city: paved roads, natural gas service, municipal water and sewer. Even a grocery and Starbucks within a ten-minute drive. Sorry, not going to happen.
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Old 08-31-2012, 09:39 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
7,775 posts, read 13,228,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
Interesting. I've heard stories about subdivisions being built with farmland surrounding them, and the new residents complaining about manure and other aspects of "agricultural" life.
I lived in a town of 3500. The population of the entire county was a little under 20,000. I worked for the state highway department and, at times, we had to work at night during snow and ice or any other emergencies. For years we would take dump trucks and loaders on the back lot, behind 2 houses and a vacant lot, to load salt, sand or rock. Not long before I retired someone built a house on that vacant lot. One winter night we were putting snowplows on the trucks out on the lot with a lot of hammering, banging, chains hitting the plows, etc. The people in the new house called the police to tell us they were going to file a complaint against every one of us for all the noise we were making. The police officer told them, and he has a way with words, that he would advise then to make a quick trip down to Walmart, buy a couple thick pillows and cover their ears with them because we were there long before they were and we had a reason to be out there. We still got static from them for quite a while!
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Old 09-01-2012, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
2,311 posts, read 3,667,669 times
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No place is this more emphisized than Kalispell Montana.

Starting in the early nineties home developers started to purchase massive tracks of land in and around the area and began building exclusive gated subdivisions for the wealthy.

Kalispell had always had it's share of wealthy out of state residents building trophy mansions in the mountains surrounding the town but nothing like the nineties saw in terms of the destruction of a indigenous population area.

Ranch and farm land that had been owned by the same families for generations now could not be afforded due to astronomical property taxes.

Working and middle class homes that were owned by hard working long term residents of the area now had to sell due to the same property tax increases felt by their farm and ranch counterparts.

This is an extreme example of what can and has happened to rural towns that just happened to be located in proximity to very beautiful and intense scenery.

I lived in Helena Montana for 14 years and had in laws that lived in the Kalispell area.
This allowed me to visit and study this issue for quite some time in order to come to this conclusion.

Today Kalispell and the surrounding area is only obtainable by the wealthy.
Those that serve them must live away from the area.

I am for sustainable growth in any rural environment but when it crosses into an area that causes this sort of income isolation then it must be stopped.
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:19 AM
 
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My daughter and I helped some friends pick corn last night for this morning's market. It was hot, tiring, dirty work and when we were through, we all decided to go down the road to a winery there for a glass of wine. We went in filthy dirty, amidst some of the transplants, but the owner knew my friend so he was very welcoming to us. We ordered our wine, got a table, and our friend went out to the truck and brought the owner a dozen ears of corn, and plopped them on the bar. Talk about funny looks?
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:27 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,853 posts, read 30,803,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
How many people have encountered this attitude?

I've encountered this attitude many times reading about rural areas, and in real life (being a resident of a "rural" area).

The simple fact is this divide exists. Urbanites, especially wealthy urbanites, are often portrayed as having a much different attitude than life-long residents of rural areas. Urbanites often establish a retirement or vacation or permanent home in rural areas seeking "peace" and "tranquility", only to find that they cannot take their nature hike on their newly-purchased acreage because it's hunting season and the risk of stray bullets hitting them is worse than in the toughest urban ghetto, or to discover on their weekend retreat that the "serene" and "ecologically precious" trails running through their wooded country estate have ruts in them from youth on ATVs and dirt bikes.

What do you think of this? City-people who have moved or established a home country-side, what was your perception of the natives, and was there any culture shock? Did you bridge it, and if you did, what did your "peace offering" consist of?
I have encountered this more times than I care to remember having moved to Stone County, Missouri. The indigenous population here has a collective IQ of about 75 and anyone with book learnin' is generally the object of great disdain.

We do not mingle amongst the locals. Instead, when we aren't working (which is rare) we prefer to socialize with like-minded people. Chiefly, people who have moved here from somewhere else and have all their teeth. We do not communicate with our "neighbors" (the nearest being about 1/4 mile away), there are a few people nearby that we have met but they have retired from elsewhere.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 09-01-2012, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,490 posts, read 38,410,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I have encountered this more times than I care to remember having moved to Stone County, Missouri. The indigenous population here has a collective IQ of about 75 and anyone with book learnin' is generally the object of great disdain.

We do not mingle amongst the locals. Instead, when we aren't working (which is rare) we prefer to socialize with like-minded people. Chiefly, people who have moved here from somewhere else and have all their teeth. We do not communicate with our "neighbors" (the nearest being about 1/4 mile away), there are a few people nearby that we have met but they have retired from elsewhere.

20yrsinBranson
And this attitude would be precisely WHY an attitude such as that described in the OP exists.
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Old 09-01-2012, 01:07 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
And this attitude would be precisely WHY an attitude such as that described in the OP exists.
This attitude is a result of being treated very badly. I assure you that I did not start off this way. I have known people PERSONALLY who have attempted to "make nice" with the locals and it has resulted in vandalism and their house very nearly being burned down because someone got "jealous". I learned very, very quickly that you do not cross the line with these people. TexasHorseLady, things may be much different where you live, I don't know. But until you have lived in the backwoods of the Ozarks, you don't have a clue how it can be here.

The best thing you can possibly do is keep to yourself, keep a low profile and keep out of their way.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 09-01-2012, 01:10 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,853 posts, read 30,803,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
How many people have encountered this attitude?

I've encountered this attitude many times reading about rural areas, and in real life (being a resident of a "rural" area).

The simple fact is this divide exists. Urbanites, especially wealthy urbanites, are often portrayed as having a much different attitude than life-long residents of rural areas. Urbanites often establish a retirement or vacation or permanent home in rural areas seeking "peace" and "tranquility", only to find that they cannot take their nature hike on their newly-purchased acreage because it's hunting season and the risk of stray bullets hitting them is worse than in the toughest urban ghetto, or to discover on their weekend retreat that the "serene" and "ecologically precious" trails running through their wooded country estate have ruts in them from youth on ATVs and dirt bikes.

What do you think of this? City-people who have moved or established a home country-side, what was your perception of the natives, and was there any culture shock? Did you bridge it, and if you did, what did your "peace offering" consist of?
Urbanites who want to keep ATVs and dirt bikes off their property need to fence it with a locked gate. Letting it be known that they have strung some wire across trails at strategic locations (about head high), will discourage these trespassers as well as signs that say "No Trespassing". Doing a little target practice during the weekends is also a good idea.

20yrisnBranson
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Old 09-01-2012, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 18,071,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Urbanites who want to keep ATVs and dirt bikes off their property need to fence it with a locked gate. Letting it be known that they have strung some wire across trails at strategic locations (about head high), will discourage these trespassers as well as signs that say "No Trespassing". 20yrisnBranson
Although I don't claim to know Missouri law, I would certainly want to check that law very carefully before creating any potentially lethal booby traps, even on my own property. You could find yourself in extremely deep legal trouble - civil, criminal, or both - if anyone were to be killed or seriously injured by one of your booby traps, even if that person was trespassing illegally on your land. Whether that seems fair to you or not, the law is what it is (often counter-intuitive).
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