U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-29-2012, 08:35 AM
 
2,878 posts, read 3,927,056 times
Reputation: 3083

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
She never said they wanted to live cheaply; she implied just the opposite. Like everyone else, they wish to lives their dreams. Why shouldn't they?
Hey, that was my advice!

By the way, where did they say they wanted to live lavishly? From their post I understood that they are both looking for jobs so obviously they are not independently wealthy. They want to own land and horses eventually (both are EXPENSIVE!) but right now just rent.

The reason I gave the advice is because today a lot of young Americans rack up heavy debt in their 20s (credit cards, education loans, cars etc.) and then spend the rest of their lives trying to pay it off (and all they do is keep adding - kids, mortgages, cars, vacations...)

I say enjoy yourself on the cheap, travel around and see what place is the one you truly love. After that you can get the job, the mortgage, the children or none of the above, whatever tickles your fancy. When it is only two of you and you know how to be modest - you can see a lot of this country for next to nothing. In my opinion, seeing it all is the best way to know where you want to settle down.

OD
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-28-2017, 02:39 AM
 
1 posts, read 835 times
Reputation: 20
Colorado is a joke with too many high cost homes and lots of horrible social and economic problems. The California model has destroyed Colorado. And really a 4 year university is a 4 year university regardless where you go
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2017, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Idaho
2,576 posts, read 2,395,357 times
Reputation: 5463
I live just north of Pocatello and love it. The INL site has one, if not, the oldest reactors in the USA but is quite safe. (And upwind is better than downwind. ). But the INL brings in a lot of money for the state and a lot of professional people. These people tend to move to either ID Falls, Pocatello and some in smaller numbers Blackfoot. I guess I would be more worried about the Caldera in Yellowstone blowing up then a nuke accident, and if that happens, yea we are screwed, but so is the world considering how big it is and the damage it would cause. (Just look up Idaho National Laboratories for more information.)

It is the home of Idaho State University, supposed to be a good school, I can't say for sure since I moved here long after my college years. My neighbor is a professor there, and one thing I noted is he is as conservative as me.

The area is pretty, being that Pocatello is in a valley surrounded by decent size mountains (believe the highest is around 8K, but most are low lying. Hiking trails in and outside of town. Approx. 2.5 hours to Yellowstone, Tetons, Salt Lake City. Some decent ski resorts nearby (or so I'm told by skiers), Park City UT is about three hours away. Generally it is a great area to get out and see nature without a lot of traveling and a fantastic place to get out and away from everything in a half hour or less.

Weather in this area tends to be a bit drier than other areas, winters are USUALLY mild (this past winter was wetter than normal so we had plenty of snow, and in fact as I write this I might have about 2 inches on the back deck). However, if you like snow, it is easy enough to find in the winter. Summers are in the 90s and dry, technically this area is considered semi-arid, with the Arco desert just to the north of the city.

Easy to get through town, and easy to bypass from north to south via I-15 that runs through town, if you want to avoid all the traffic.

Housing values are decent, property taxes are low, sales is 6% everywhere in the state, income tax is a bit high.

The state is still very red (however, Pocatello itself tends to be a more purple due to being a college town.); unlike CO where the red area of the state is either south of Denver or west of the Rockies.

And the area from Fort Collins to Denver and south to CO springs is a mess of traffic. Haven't been there in two years, but when I lived in SE UT I used to visit friends in Boulder, Denver and CO springs areas quite a bit and traffic drove me crazy. If you are comfortable with a lot of traffic, probably not a problem. For me, I moved from the Detroit, DC areas to get away from heavy traffic.

I would also suggest posting in the states and city areas you are interested so that you will get more input from other people in those areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2017, 07:55 AM
 
12,412 posts, read 5,546,284 times
Reputation: 20520
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado-native View Post
Colorado is a joke with too many high cost homes and lots of horrible social and economic problems. The California model has destroyed Colorado. And really a 4 year university is a 4 year university regardless where you go
Colorado has become a smaller CA without the coast. Not much difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 12:11 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,509 posts, read 41,105,188 times
Reputation: 25093
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Colorado has become a smaller CA without the coast. Not much difference.
lots more angry young men with guns decide to 'act' in Colorado.

There are several reasons for this.

Consider these reasons and the resultant consequences when you are shopping for a place to relocate. (CO will be leading gun restrictions soon enough)

ID has plenty of crazies, but they tend to stay 'back-country'. (Do be careful when in their territory.)

MT has overhead, nice places are expensive or taken, not so nice places have problems (petty crime, 'postal neighbors') .

WY is very tough for limited real estate and high CoL / energy state
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 02:50 PM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
842 posts, read 635,518 times
Reputation: 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
lots more angry young men with guns decide to 'act' in Colorado.

There are several reasons for this.

Consider these reasons and the resultant consequences when you are shopping for a place to relocate. (CO will be leading gun restrictions soon enough)

ID has plenty of crazies, but they tend to stay 'back-country'. (Do be careful when in their territory.)

MT has overhead, nice places are expensive or taken, not so nice places have problems (petty crime, 'postal neighbors') .

WY is very tough for limited real estate and high CoL / energy state


This comment about Montana is false. Montana does have above average income taxes, but there is still plenty of affordable real estate. Property taxes are very reasonable. Wages in some industries may be below average, but there are lots of good jobs here. Especially for jobs that require a degree, or technical education. The two major universities are Montana State (Bozeman), and the University of Montana (Missoula). Those towns have some of the highest COL in the state. There are other colleges, in cheaper areas. Montana Tech (Butte), Carroll College (Helena), The University of Great Falls (Great Falls), and Rocky Mountain College (Billings).


The state has a great public education system, and all of the outdoor activities you can think of. There are plenty of entry level law enforcement jobs. I live in the Helena area and I can answer any questions you have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,151 posts, read 50,332,412 times
Reputation: 19856
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
This comment about Montana is false. Montana does have above average income taxes, but there is still plenty of affordable real estate. Property taxes are very reasonable. Wages in some industries may be below average, but there are lots of good jobs here. Especially for jobs that require a degree, or technical education. The two major universities are Montana State (Bozeman), and the University of Montana (Missoula). Those towns have some of the highest COL in the state. There are other colleges, in cheaper areas. Montana Tech (Butte), Carroll College (Helena), The University of Great Falls (Great Falls), and Rocky Mountain College (Billings).


The state has a great public education system, and all of the outdoor activities you can think of. There are plenty of entry level law enforcement jobs. I live in the Helena area and I can answer any questions you have.
What people consider to be 'low' property taxes varies widely.

How big is your house and how much acreage are you on? And what are your property taxes?

I have a new 3bdrm, 2400 sq ft house on 150 acres of land with 1/4 mile of river frontage, my taxes are $850/year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2017, 08:19 PM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,670,682 times
Reputation: 7717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
What people consider to be 'low' property taxes varies widely.

How big is your house and how much acreage are you on? And what are your property taxes?

I have a new 3bdrm, 2400 sq ft house on 150 acres of land with 1/4 mile of river frontage, my taxes are $850/year.
Yup, after paying Minnesota's high property tax, I decided one of my criteria for relocating was an annual tax less than $1,000. I easily have met that criteria.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2017, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,151 posts, read 50,332,412 times
Reputation: 19856
Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
Yup, after paying Minnesota's high property tax, I decided one of my criteria for relocating was an annual tax less than $1,000. I easily have met that criteria.
High or low cost / taxes are relative.

I have owned homes in the past where I was paying $5,000 - $6,000 in taxes, for tiny city lot properties. Whereas now I have a huge house on a large parcel of land with taxes under $1,000. People say that New England is expensive, it is all relative though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:00 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top