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Old 06-30-2014, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,592,221 times
Reputation: 7437

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomchard View Post
Thank You, Everyone - For your terrific stories - I'm chompin' at th' bit, wanting to get back to small-town-TEXAS for retirement. Your stories & remembrances have made me all nostalgic for 'home' ...
"Buzz Bee's" posting of "The Code Of Country Living" is terrific! Would that more small communities that we've looked at would post something like this - even include it when someone purchases property within the community/village/town limits. It could "set the expectations" of some folks to a more-realistic level ...

Best Regards to y'all - Hope you'll have a great Independence Day Holiday - on the 4th of July!
There are some Great Small towns in Texas. My favorites are in or near Anderson county.

Tennessee Colony

Montalba (Highly reccommend)

Oak Wood

Elkhart
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Old 06-30-2014, 05:57 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,512,584 times
Reputation: 7542
tomchard, good luck and I hope your small town dreams come true!
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Old 07-01-2014, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 26,374,342 times
Reputation: 6283
I gave up city traffic and noise to live rural 30 years ago. I do not regret it. Rural towns are isolated and generally self-contained with a power plant, police and fire, grocer, small hospital, and a lot of nature. A town of size say 15,000 might be 20 miles, but at really big town of say 10000 may be 50-60 miles. Our towns are separated by thousands of acres of beans, corn and cows; it is what an Ag state is.

Most rural towns are clannish. You are the interloper, the outsider. The residents are suspicious and a bit fearful - especially if they have had problems with other outsiders. They don't like change, they fight change, they don't want it or you.

You can't change it, time does. Shop local, eat local, buy local, bank local, attend a local church, go to the local doctor, and use local service persons such as electricians. Four years down the road people will call you by your name, and someone else will be the outsider.

The two things to understand about rural is where the county seat it located, and the rest of the county is not served by city employees. The county seat is generally where the courthouse and the county library are located. Generally speaking county services are slow and inconvenient. The doctors, lawyers and hospital are usually located in the City that is the seat of county government. This City is where the fastest internet signal, and best cable picture is found. Don't expect screaming fast downloads. 6-10Mbps is fast in rural America. It is where you find the most cell towers and strongest tower signal, and the widest cell area coverage. This is especially true if you are in a town that is say 200 miles from cities like Chicago, Minneapolis, D.C., Austin, NOLA, Atlanta, LV or Boston.

Another thing, just because the City is served by AT&T and Comcast does bot mean that one foot over the city/county boundary line is served by either one. There is a very big possibility it will not. Instead You will have second or third tier cable and telephone, and spotty cell signal. And if you live a really poor state, the county services are greatly lacking. If you move to a poor snowy state you'll need a F250 4x4 or larger to add a blade to plow the driveway and a path to the nearest highway so emergency services can access your property.

I live on a federal highway that must be plowed, and have a 4x4. Unless the snow is 20" deep, I can get to the highway. This is rural life where I live among forests, cliffs and high rolling hills. There is no Garden of Eden, but I can't imagine living single anywhere else.
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Old 07-01-2014, 02:12 AM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,309 posts, read 3,415,319 times
Reputation: 4965
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I gave up city traffic and noise to live rural 30 years ago. I do not regret it. Rural towns are isolated and generally self-contained with a power plant, police and fire, grocer, small hospital, and a lot of nature. A town of size say 15,000 might be 20 miles, but at really big town of say 10000 may be 50-60 miles. Our towns are separated by thousands of acres of beans, corn and cows; it is what an Ag state is.

Most rural towns are clannish. You are the interloper, the outsider. The residents are suspicious and a bit fearful - especially if they have had problems with other outsiders. They don't like change, they fight change, they don't want it or you.

You can't change it, time does. Shop local, eat local, buy local, bank local, attend a local church, go to the local doctor, and use local service persons such as electricians. Four years down the road people will call you by your name, and someone else will be the outsider.

The two things to understand about rural is where the county seat it located, and the rest of the county is not served by city employees. The county seat is generally where the courthouse and the county library are located. Generally speaking county services are slow and inconvenient. The doctors, lawyers and hospital are usually located in the City that is the seat of county government. This City is where the fastest internet signal, and best cable picture is found. Don't expect screaming fast downloads. 6-10Mbps is fast in rural America. It is where you find the most cell towers and strongest tower signal, and the widest cell area coverage. This is especially true if you are in a town that is say 200 miles from cities like Chicago, Minneapolis, D.C., Austin, NOLA, Atlanta, LV or Boston.

Another thing, just because the City is served by AT&T and Comcast does bot mean that one foot over the city/county boundary line is served by either one. There is a very big possibility it will not. Instead You will have second or third tier cable and telephone, and spotty cell signal. And if you live a really poor state, the county services are greatly lacking. If you move to a poor snowy state you'll need a F250 4x4 or larger to add a blade to plow the driveway and a path to the nearest highway so emergency services can access your property.

I live on a federal highway that must be plowed, and have a 4x4. Unless the snow is 20" deep, I can get to the highway. This is rural life where I live among forests, cliffs and high rolling hills. There is no Garden of Eden, but I can't imagine living single anywhere else.
Where in Oklahoma do you live..........do you still have any decent Quail hunting in your area?
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Old 07-01-2014, 07:49 AM
 
Location: South Hills
632 posts, read 707,350 times
Reputation: 431
I once worked as a manager for a retail chain which had a lot of stores in small towns.

One of my rules of thumb was that if I was assigned to a store in a small town I made it a point
not to live in the same town. I always chose another town at least 15-20 miles away. The reason
being that if I ever had to fire anybody, and half the town was related to them, and the other half
had known them all their lives, my life would have become an absolute living hell.
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Old 07-01-2014, 08:16 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,512,584 times
Reputation: 7542
We're pretty rural in our town of 650.

We have a volunteer fire company and EMS. One general store, two bars.

No police, sheriff or state trooper is 12 miles away.

Hospital is 32 miles. There is a clinic 12 miles away that is available during business hours but no overnight emergency services.

There are two hydro power plants about 15 miles away, whether we get our power from them is debateable. The power company only delivers power now, you have to choose your supplier.

We have court in our town hall and a library. The library is in an old two bedroom house.

The nearest cell signal is 15 miles away.

Depending on how close you are to the little phone huts you may or may not get internet via phone line. If you don't, it's dial up or satellite.

Nearest cable is 15 miles away, we all have satellite TV here.

And, yep, if you don't have a plow you had better have nice neighbors.
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Old 07-01-2014, 09:04 AM
 
3,438 posts, read 4,836,925 times
Reputation: 5408
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I gave up city traffic and noise to live rural 30 years ago. I do not regret it. Rural towns are isolated and generally self-contained with a power plant, police and fire, grocer, small hospital, and a lot of nature. A town of size say 15,000 might be 20 miles, but at really big town of say 10000 may be 50-60 miles. Our towns are separated by thousands of acres of beans, corn and cows; it is what an Ag state is.

Most rural towns are clannish. You are the interloper, the outsider. The residents are suspicious and a bit fearful - especially if they have had problems with other outsiders. They don't like change, they fight change, they don't want it or you.

You can't change it, time does. Shop local, eat local, buy local, bank local, attend a local church, go to the local doctor, and use local service persons such as electricians. Four years down the road people will call you by your name, and someone else will be the outsider.

The two things to understand about rural is where the county seat it located, and the rest of the county is not served by city employees. The county seat is generally where the courthouse and the county library are located. Generally speaking county services are slow and inconvenient. The doctors, lawyers and hospital are usually located in the City that is the seat of county government. This City is where the fastest internet signal, and best cable picture is found. Don't expect screaming fast downloads. 6-10Mbps is fast in rural America. It is where you find the most cell towers and strongest tower signal, and the widest cell area coverage. This is especially true if you are in a town that is say 200 miles from cities like Chicago, Minneapolis, D.C., Austin, NOLA, Atlanta, LV or Boston.

Another thing, just because the City is served by AT&T and Comcast does bot mean that one foot over the city/county boundary line is served by either one. There is a very big possibility it will not. Instead You will have second or third tier cable and telephone, and spotty cell signal. And if you live a really poor state, the county services are greatly lacking. If you move to a poor snowy state you'll need a F250 4x4 or larger to add a blade to plow the driveway and a path to the nearest highway so emergency services can access your property.

I live on a federal highway that must be plowed, and have a 4x4. Unless the snow is 20" deep, I can get to the highway. This is rural life where I live among forests, cliffs and high rolling hills. There is no Garden of Eden, but I can't imagine living single anywhere else.

( 1st paragraph )..........."Our towns are separated by thousands of acres of beans, , corn, and cows;it is what an ag state is "

( last paragraph ).........." I live among forests , cliffs, and high rolling hills "


Sounds like the area you describe in those 2 paragraphs are direct opposites.
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Old 07-01-2014, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
175 posts, read 274,235 times
Reputation: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye Burgher View Post
I once worked as a manager for a retail chain which had a lot of stores in small towns.

One of my rules of thumb was that if I was assigned to a store in a small town I made it a point
not to live in the same town. I always chose another town at least 15-20 miles away. The reason
being that if I ever had to fire anybody, and half the town was related to them, and the other half
had known them all their lives, my life would have become an absolute living hell.

Learned that the hard way. Also, if you live in the same town as your store, people will call you when the store is closed to open it so they can pick something up.
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Old 07-01-2014, 02:31 PM
 
534 posts, read 556,601 times
Reputation: 969
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
tomchard, good luck and I hope your small town dreams come true!
Thanks, "CCc Girl" - I used-to exist in Upstate NY, Roc-Buf area, too - in another life. Saw the "light" and got-th'-heck-out of New York State as fast as I could!
TEXAS has shown me more about life than any place I've ever lived; and, I can now say that I've lived on both Coasts, the Deep South, and (of course) TEXAS - which is, by far, the nicest place I've ever been.

Our "desire" is to get back to a slower pace, independent of the "grid" if at-all-possible, learn to be neighborly, again ... something that's extremely-difficult for us, living here in "Big City California" ... And, to be able to stretch what little we have left, to cover what years we have left.

My Mom used to say: "To each their own" - I've kinda adopted that saying, with one correction: "To each their own, but quit buggin' me about you wantin' mine!"
And, that's a whole 'nother post, altogether!
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Old 07-02-2014, 07:07 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,512,584 times
Reputation: 7542
LOL Tom, we've been planning our escape from NY for a year. High hopes for your off grid country life.
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