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Old 03-22-2014, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,165 posts, read 2,916,905 times
Reputation: 2885

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainrose View Post
Thank you - I couldn't have said it better.
I have been an organic farmer and/or gardener for 45 years. I was involved with 'permaculture' before there was even a word for it, and probably before The OP was born. I have seen the good and bad in both parties. Some of the best land stewards, wildlife habitat protectors, and savvy farmers I have known are very conservative in nature. And i have seen hypocritical wealthy liberals with a carbon footprint the size of Godzilla while bragging they eat and live an organic lifestyle.
I am politically independent, and I hate it when people bring in partisan politics and self-righteous superiority to attack, divide, and alienate the rural and/or farming communities.
This makes me chuckle. I pulled out of the most liberal farmers market in the region because of the infighting. The vendors would argue behind the scenes over everything, including who got the shady spot, while covers of Bob Dylan songs played. The personal attacks and greedy capitalism got old fast.

Almost all of the permaculture people I have met are the same way. Completely self-absorbed and status driven. Portlandia to the max.

P.S. I have voted for both parties.
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Old 03-22-2014, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,165 posts, read 2,916,905 times
Reputation: 2885
Originally Posted by nurider2002
Just curious because I hear this complaint a lot - how do they change the town into a duplicate of what they left behind? I'm a yankee (no apology here) and will be relocating to a rural area in South Carolina in a year or two. Although I am pretty liberal by most folks standards, I have no interest in changing the character of the place I live. I also don't believe that it's a good idea for folks to pick where they want to live based on whether the area is considered "conservative" or "liberal". I just prefer a quiet rural environment without seeing tons of retail, chain stores/restaurants, traffic and noise. Whether my neighbors like me or not doesn't matter to me. If we are friends - great, if not, live and let live. I just think folks in general have gotten too polarized over things that don't matter. We don't all have to agree politically/religously/whatever to be neighbors. I understand that there are some in the South who resent Yankees. Not my problem - I live where I want to live. I'm not interested in changing the culture, I'm just looking for a quiet place with natural beauty.



Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
What I bolded is part of the answer to your question.
Many miss the stores, the specialty restaurants, the "arts", diversity (whatever that is) of where they left.

They want dog parks in areas where every house has a large yard, multiple coffee shoppes where the population can barely support one. No hunting because people who might have guns in their vehicle, dressed in blaze orange or camouflage, scare them.

"Farming smells bad and the tractors go soooooooooo slow, why can't they drive at night? And look at the dust."

Here on the Chesapeake, the workboats look ugly and complaints are registered about the crab pots, which are all legal.

They complain when the older men gather at the gas station and drink coffee in the morning, brag about their degrees, insult the locals by calling them inbreds, complain about something by starting out with a variation of "Well, where we come from this wouldn't be allowed".

They want everyone to submit their paint colors to a design committee for approval so a neighborhood is "harmonious", demand everyone have identical trash cans for consistency, not park in front of the house, especially a nasty work truck with a company name.

Everyone has to have a lawn, with minimal flowers and trees, because that's what you do in the country.

I'm tired or I could go on. Every single example I listed has come up where I live in the last year.

This isn't everyone but the vast majority. One reason I derisively call them rural pioneers.

Yep. Newcomers want "improvements" (aka higher taxes). "Better" this or that. Everything is "backwards". Roads, schools, services, shopping, restaurants, etc. A lot of remodeling takes place. They either gut the building or tear it down completely. What rises up from the ashes are newly remodeled "districts" and "neighborhoods" with price tags that natives can't afford. The farmland is gobbled up by tract housing and shopping. We used to joke that there was either a bank or drug store on every corner once growth hit the city. The lakes and sea islands...oh...I can't tell you how much the waterfront has changed in the South. Lakes surrounded by woods with maybe a cabin or trailer here or there are now lined with mcmansions. These were the same people who were first attracted to the area because of the natural landscape. I can't leave out "exclusive" with lots of "communities". No more public access.
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Old 03-28-2014, 02:58 PM
 
3,595 posts, read 5,111,037 times
Reputation: 3626
Shepherdstown, West Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-30-2014, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,502 posts, read 6,259,327 times
Reputation: 3693
Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
News flash: A lot of diehard conservatives wholeheartedly support organic farming!
What about urban farming? Just curious.
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Old 04-04-2014, 09:43 AM
 
186 posts, read 325,400 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by juniperjennie View Post
Thanks for the replies so far.
Unfortunately, I don't know any "diehard conservatives" who wholeheartedly support organic farming - I think this past election cycle made it clear that the Republican party is NOT in favor of environmentally friendly policies. They still believe, despite all evidence to the contrary, that climate change is a giant hoax.
.
The issues you speak of are not one and the same. Many "diehard conservative" organic farmers do not buy into the whole climate change agenda. I think its a matter of having a realist viewpoint, rather than an idealist viewpoint that is based on hype and emotion.

Typical liberal speak - buying into the stereotypes and assuming everyone is supposed to think exactly the same about everything...otherwise they are evil conservatives. Most liberals don't even know what it really means to be "liberal".

Why is it so wrong for people to stand behind their beliefs? You liberals sure do! I am moving from a very liberal God-less city to a very rural area soon because I'm tired of yipees telling me what to do and how to live my life. I want to get away from that hyppocritical liberal mindset, as well as the high taxes, corrupt government, croneyism, and highly androgynous society that comes along with living in the inner-city. I don't know what the locals' political beliefs are, but I know, because of where I will be living that I will be comfortable among people who share very similar concerns and ultimately similar values. I grew up in the area that I'm moving back to and I am highly concerned about the deterioration of my (soon to be) LOCAL enviornmental conditions. I look forward to having a plot of land where I can do things MYSELF to help IMPROVE our LOCAL environmental conditions, but I'm not going to tell anyone else what they should be doing because for the most part, they are. They care about the longevity of their resources.
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Old 04-04-2014, 09:58 AM
 
186 posts, read 325,400 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by nurider2002 View Post
Just curious because I hear this complaint a lot - how do they change the town into a duplicate of what they left behind? I'm a yankee (no apology here) and will be relocating to a rural area in South Carolina in a year or two. Although I am pretty liberal by most folks standards, I have no interest in changing the character of the place I live. I also don't believe that it's a good idea for folks to pick where they want to live based on whether the area is considered "conservative" or "liberal". I just prefer a quiet rural environment without seeing tons of retail, chain stores/restaurants, traffic and noise. Whether my neighbors like me or not doesn't matter to me. If we are friends - great, if not, live and let live. I just think folks in general have gotten too polarized over things that don't matter. We don't all have to agree politically/religously/whatever to be neighbors. I understand that there are some in the South who resent Yankees. Not my problem - I live where I want to live. I'm not interested in changing the culture, I'm just looking for a quiet place with natural beauty.
Based on that alone, you don't seem to fit the definition of "liberal". Maybe you should look up the real meaning. You sound more like a "libertarian" or politically speaking "independent".
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Old 08-08-2014, 05:59 PM
 
3,155 posts, read 1,145,763 times
Reputation: 3541
I think that once someone uses the term liberal or conservative it automatically becomes a wedge in the conversation.
I like to live in a place where I can live my life and as long as what I do doesn't affect anyone else then its non of their business.

It's about minding your own business and not thinking your beliefs or way of life are better and most be imposed on everyone else . Both people that consider themselves Liberal and Conservatives are guilty of trying to impose their way of life on others.
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Old 12-12-2014, 09:00 AM
 
106 posts, read 184,672 times
Reputation: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleLove08 View Post
I'm not sure if Asheville, NC counts as far as Appalachian but I've heard great things about the progressive mindset of the people there and an emphasis on supporting locally owned ventures.

Eureka Springs, AR might be a good spot-the only downside is that it's more of a tourist town. It can be really dead during some times of the year.

I agree, Asheville, NC. Beautiful city. Charlottesville, VA might be worth looking into as well.
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Old 12-13-2014, 01:34 AM
 
Location: Lexington, Kentucky
7,845 posts, read 4,268,909 times
Reputation: 14333
Quote:
Originally Posted by juniperjennie View Post
Hi!
I would really appreciate any help/advice I can get! I'm looking for a liberal/progressive rural town to move to. Here are my criteria:
1. liberal/progressive community/politics
2. in/close to a mountainous region (preferably the Appalachian mountains)
3. low cost of living
4. available and relatively affordable farm land (we wish to be organic farmers)
5. university close by

Is there anyplace that fits this description?!? It doesn't have to meet all those criteria, just some.

Thanks so much for any advice you can give!!

Berea Kentucky - thriving town with Liberal arts College (No tuition charged - students pay for tuition by working in shops, or as artists.) The only thing I am not sure about is whether or not it would be Liberal or Conservative.

Quote:
Berea is home to a thriving population of weavers, instrument makers, furniture artisans, jewelry designers, glass workers, potters, painters, sculptors, and musicians. The story of Berea’s artisan community is interwoven with the historic Berea College, the first interracial and coeducational college in the South. Berea has a longstanding tradition of diversity, social justice, environmental responsibility, and community service. Both college and town are committed to the practice of sustainability and conservation.


Berea.com
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Old 12-14-2014, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina
2,763 posts, read 3,066,059 times
Reputation: 4263
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleLove08 View Post
I'm not sure if Asheville, NC counts as far as Appalachian but I've heard great things about the progressive mindset of the people there and an emphasis on supporting locally owned ventures.

Eureka Springs, AR might be a good spot-the only downside is that it's more of a tourist town. It can be really dead during some times of the year.
Asheville definitely counts as Appalachian, seeing as it's only 30 miles away from the highest mountain peak IN the Appalachians... WNC is much more Appalachia than upstate NY etc. And Eureka Springs isn't part of Appalachia at all. It's int he Ozarks.

Last edited by LordHelmit; 12-14-2014 at 10:58 PM..
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