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Old 02-08-2013, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,200 posts, read 17,051,861 times
Reputation: 12393

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
It depends on your well.....

The wells with submersible pumps are easy for the owners to treat.

The best way to keep your well clean is to use it. Turn it on and let it run.

They also run a little cheaper.

The bottom line is we all pay.
I don't think a dug well is any harder to treat than a sand point, at least not in my experience. But with a dug well you're much more likely to have something fall in there and contaminate it.
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Old 02-08-2013, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
Reputation: 19849
In previous homes we have had well water become 'bad' and we were able to treat it ourselves. Not hard at all.

Where we live now, after four years our well water became contaminated with a red algae. I hired an inspector to look at it to give us an idea of how to fix it. He found that the original well-driller had not installed a 'pitlass' adapter. I dug up the water line, found that the hole in the casing was not big enough to accept a pitlass. So I hauled out the old pump, re-drilled the hole in the casing to fit a pitlass, and put it all back together with a new pump. It has been 2 year now and our well is great

Well-drillers are good for drilling holes and setting casing. Beyond that I have my doubts.

Fortunately a home-owner can do everything needed for the plumbing and maintenance of a well.
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Old 02-08-2013, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,143 posts, read 43,070,821 times
Reputation: 51714
Quote:
Originally Posted by ck2007 View Post
Oh how I love that song by Randy Houser!
To me that song does make me think about the country I know, to some extent.
I live in a small community in Mississippi. To me it is "country". We have 1 red light, a grocery store, a couple gas stations, a bank, lots of churches, and some local businesses. We don't have corn fields, but if you drive up the highway or down the back roads there are cotton fields every where you look. There's a river up the road with a sandbar where we spend our weekends during the summer, hangin out with friends drinkin beer, swimming, fishin, and grillin. We hunt deer, and pretty much anything you can eat. We have bonfires, ride horses, ride four wheelers. It's common to see people on the side of the highway driving a four wheeler, golf cart, even a lawn mower. Everybody knows every body. You always keep a clean house because friends and neighbors drop in often, and always have a fresh pitcher of sweet tea made. There's very little crime and its safe to leave your vehicle unlocked and your windows and doors open at home. We are very well mannered (yes mam, no sir, please, thank you) it's safe to let your kids play outside and they actually do, instead of being inside on video games. To me that is my home, and that's what I think of when I think of country.

But that's just me. You hear songs by Jason Aldean and such artists and they sing about farms and plowing fields and things like that. Here in Mississippi our economy runs off of the casino industry and our marine/shipbuilding industry.

So I feel that "country" can be defined in several ways, depending on where you are at. And which to me, when I think of country I think of the South. Not to be taken offense to but thats just me!
Yep. There is no "one way" that "country" feels, IMO, regardless of cliches being easy enough to put in a hit song.

I grew up very rurally.

I have never hunted once in my life, and my fishing experience is pretty limited, too. I have never driven a tractor other than a riding lawn mower. I never owned a pickup (my dad did, though...a work truck for his contracting business). I didn't grow up riding four-wheelers, and most people locked their houses. I never shot a gun until I was in my thirties and by that point, living in a city. Few people have horses...or even livestock anymore; the government subsidies are in planting crops for biofuels and most people tilled up their grazing pasture in the past decade to put in acres of corn for ethanol, etc. I'm not a yokel or bumpkin, I'm college educated and a professional who works in a city and in a field outsie the agricultural industry. I am not southern, I grew up on the Wisconsin/Illinois border. Nobody in their right mind would ever have mistaken me for a "redneck," but I sure did spend my childhood summers running around barefoot through pastures.

But the nearest town DID have one stoplight for most of my childhood (has two, now), the landscape WAS predominantly cornfields and soybean fields, the road I grew up on was gravel, I swam in a creek and ice skated on the same one, you could see stars at night, we grew our own food in a huge garden, had well water, etc.

"Country" can look a lot of different ways.
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Old 02-10-2013, 02:48 PM
 
1,472 posts, read 2,030,446 times
Reputation: 1152
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Yep. There is no "one way" that "country" feels, IMO, regardless of cliches being easy enough to put in a hit song.

I grew up very rurally.

I have never hunted once in my life, and my fishing experience is pretty limited, too. I have never driven a tractor other than a riding lawn mower. I never owned a pickup (my dad did, though...a work truck for his contracting business). I didn't grow up riding four-wheelers, and most people locked their houses. I never shot a gun until I was in my thirties and by that point, living in a city. Few people have horses...or even livestock anymore; the government subsidies are in planting crops for biofuels and most people tilled up their grazing pasture in the past decade to put in acres of corn for ethanol, etc. I'm not a yokel or bumpkin, I'm college educated and a professional who works in a city and in a field outsie the agricultural industry. I am not southern, I grew up on the Wisconsin/Illinois border. Nobody in their right mind would ever have mistaken me for a "redneck," but I sure did spend my childhood summers running around barefoot through pastures.

But the nearest town DID have one stoplight for most of my childhood (has two, now), the landscape WAS predominantly cornfields and soybean fields, the road I grew up on was gravel, I swam in a creek and ice skated on the same one, you could see stars at night, we grew our own food in a huge garden, had well water, etc.

"Country" can look a lot of different ways.
Dang feel sorry for you

brushrunner
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Old 03-31-2013, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,623,759 times
Reputation: 2583
Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Yep. There is no "one way" that "country" feels, IMO, regardless of cliches being easy enough to put in a hit song.

I grew up very rurally.

I have never hunted once in my life, and my fishing experience is pretty limited, too. I have never driven a tractor other than a riding lawn mower. I never owned a pickup (my dad did, though...a work truck for his contracting business). I didn't grow up riding four-wheelers, and most people locked their houses. I never shot a gun until I was in my thirties and by that point, living in a city. Few people have horses...or even livestock anymore; the government subsidies are in planting crops for biofuels and most people tilled up their grazing pasture in the past decade to put in acres of corn for ethanol, etc. I'm not a yokel or bumpkin, I'm college educated and a professional who works in a city and in a field outsie the agricultural industry. I am not southern, I grew up on the Wisconsin/Illinois border. Nobody in their right mind would ever have mistaken me for a "redneck," but I sure did spend my childhood summers running around barefoot through pastures.

But the nearest town DID have one stoplight for most of my childhood (has two, now), the landscape WAS predominantly cornfields and soybean fields, the road I grew up on was gravel, I swam in a creek and ice skated on the same one, you could see stars at night, we grew our own food in a huge garden, had well water, etc.

"Country" can look a lot of different ways.
This is an interesting reply. One thing that is interesting and which you've touched on is that there is diversity in rural areas. Although I think there's still something binding that transcends that diversity. Country folks span the entire socioeconomic spectrum, are diverse, and just as many of them are college educated as those in the city. I think a lot of people with no rural exposure fail to realize this. I'd also like to say I've certainly known and do know country types who are college educated AND yokels or bumpkins. Don't you know any from your home area? Some people seem to think of a college education and experience as sort of a cultural cleansing or taking on a new culture, but it's only like that for *some* people. And honestly, I think it's only like that for kids who didn't have a strong home culture to begin with or who wanted nothing more than to escape and distance themself from said culture. In other words, some kids allow themselves to sort of be a 'tabula rasa'. I sort of did that, but since then have sort of regretted having done so and have begun to see value in much of what I wanted to abandon or distance myself from (I'm 27).

Anyway, I think the the common theme heard over and over again in country music and rhetoric is real and really exists and I think it's about having a soul free from and comfort not reliant on material things or superficial stuff like having to have your clothes, hair, make up, etc. just right and be polished all the time. A sort of "come as you are", "be as you are" approach to life. This isn't an idea exactly exclusive to 'country', but it seems to be common in country culture. It could also mean not worrying so much about being PC, trying to be smart or intellectual all the time, etc. Sort of light hearted, relaxed, and not worrying about what others might think of you.
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Old 03-31-2013, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,623,759 times
Reputation: 2583
Quote:
Originally Posted by brushrunner View Post
Dang feel sorry for you

brushrunner
Why?
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Old 04-28-2013, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Cumberland Plateau
23 posts, read 54,435 times
Reputation: 74
I'm not speaking for Brushrunner, but I kind of had the same reaction, though maybe not for the same reasons. I'm thankful for the opportunities throughout my life to fish and hunt. Some of the best times with family, friends, even new acquaintances have been in the woods or on the water. I much prefer that to playing a game of whatever. I feel someone is missing out if they haven't spent time in the woods or on the water (whether a creek bank or offshore in the Gulf, Atlantic or Pacific). I took my kids, even my daughter, out of school a few times a year when they were growing up to go with me. Their grades never suffered, and I feel they're better all around for it. I've driven trucks most of my life. Though they cost more in fuel, I consider a truck much more practical than a car. We had horses, hogs, chickens and dogs when I was a kid. We have chickens, goats, and dogs now. Just Spending a few minutes a day with them they provide a calming affect and just some general entertainment if nothing else. I've lived off well water most of my life with no ill effects. I'd rather do that as opposed to paying for city water. I do agree with TabulaRasa that " 'Country' can look a lot of different ways". I grew up on Country music and to me most of today's country sounds like '70's Rock. I still listen to it, but I'm frequently drawn to the "older country" stations on Sirius. Sorry, I kind of got off track. Sometimes it's easy to just start rambling. I consider TabulaRasa as 'country' based on the post. But having missed out on some of the great things life has to offer. But I'm sure we've all missed out on some of the great things life has to offer.
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Old 04-30-2013, 09:37 PM
 
12,683 posts, read 17,014,033 times
Reputation: 24548
I was a country boy even while working in the French Quarters of New Orleans and while sitting in an office cubicle inside the Beltway of D.C. but sometimes you've just got to pay the fiddler.

Although I'm a bit old for Randy Houser, he has a good tune there. I guess I'm more into:


TOM T. HALL - Country Is - YouTube
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Old 05-06-2013, 09:48 PM
 
Location: A Very Naughtytown In Northwestern Montanifornia U.S.A.
1,088 posts, read 1,628,143 times
Reputation: 1980
Default "Country" In Our Neck Of The Woods. ~♥~

Angus in an old barn in northwestern Montana. ~♥~

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Old 05-06-2013, 10:44 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 8,231,940 times
Reputation: 8892

John Denver & Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - Thank God I'm A Country Boy (Live at Farm Aid 1985) - YouTube
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