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Old 01-25-2013, 02:39 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,623,759 times
Reputation: 2583

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Obviously I'm referring to the newer song 'How Country Feels' by newer artist Randy Houser.

Listening to the song while driving to the grocery store (deep into the city), I was thinking "Yeah, I know how country feels....". But I haven't had that feeling in a long time. Sometimes I think I'm missing something or forgetting how different (better) being outside of the city is. I grew up in a blue-collar/country-ish family in a part of a metropolitan area with mostly similar people, which was sort of halfway how country feels, but that was nothing compared to living in rural Oklahoma between a farm and ranch and a small town in southeast Kansas.

So I guess my point is that the feeling is definitely real. Urban and rural culture are different. What I'm wondering is if the reasons for the different 'feel' can be explained in words. And is the feeling really the difference between city and country or is it just as much a mindset/state of mind?

Some ideas I've had that I think play a role in the difference is that in the city people have a bigger degree of separation and seem more afraid of strangers, whereas people in the country and small are friendlier and 'closer together'. Another thought I've had is that humility plays a huge role in the difference between city and country. The country seems much more humble, whereas the city is much more prideful - hence the reason a city person is skiddish or uncomfortable to just relax and figuratively "let their hair down". None of these are absolutes, just maybe tendencies for each type of area.

Any thoughts???


Randy Houser - How Country Feels - YouTube

You were raised on an asphalt farm
Ain't never heard a rooster crow
Never walked barefoot by a river
Never felt mud up between your toes

You never rolled in the hay
Ya never thrown it in four wheel
Climb on up in here, girl
Let me show ya how country feels

Let your hair down, hair down
Getcha some this laid-on back
Kick your shoes off, kick 'em off
Getcha some of this slow down fast
I'll take you up and down these hollers and hills
Let me show you how country feels

You ever watched the sun go down
From the bed of a pickup truck
Ever been so into somebody
You're still lying there when it comes back up
[ From: Song Lyrics - eLyrics.net ]

Girl, what do ya say
Cut a path through that cornfield
Park down by the water
Let me show you how country feels

Let your hair down, hair down
Getcha some this laid-on back
Kick your shoes off, kick 'em off
Getcha some of this slow down fast
I'll take you up and down these hollers and hills
Let me show you how country feels

Let your hair down
Getcha some this laid-on back
Kick your shoes off

Let your hair down, hair down
Getcha some this laid-on back
Kick your shoes off, kick 'em off
Getcha some of this slow down fast
I'll take you up and down these hollers and hills
Let me show you how country feels

Country feels
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:42 AM
 
568 posts, read 836,622 times
Reputation: 1244
Country is fresh air, quiet, birds, trees, grass, deer and other animals coming across the pasture...friendly neighbors and pure beauty. City is ****ty...too much traffic, too many people, dirty..living too close together, barking dogs right outside your window day and night....ugh!!! NOTmare!!!!
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Old 01-25-2013, 10:49 AM
 
Location: A Very Naughtytown In Northwestern Montanifornia U.S.A.
1,088 posts, read 1,628,143 times
Reputation: 1980
Default Out in our neck of the woods ~♥~ We get that country feeling.

Out in our neck of the woods a scene like this lets us know how "country" feels.
(and smells) !



Trocking cattle down on down a county road can cause a "country" traffic jam !

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Old 01-25-2013, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,200 posts, read 17,051,861 times
Reputation: 12393
Ah, yes, the recent trend of songs in country music that glamorize country living. Too bad so many of them are written by folks who obviously don't live in the country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris LeDoux
Country is heart and dust and snow
where the winters get down to forty below
And the works is hard
And the pay sure low
and it ain't all roses being country.
Gotta take the good with the bad.
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Old 01-25-2013, 03:18 PM
 
Location: High Bridge, NJ
3,858 posts, read 8,505,164 times
Reputation: 3339
Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
Ah, yes, the recent trend of songs in country music that glamorize country living. Too bad so many of them are written by folks who obviously don't live in the country.
I call them "list songs." You basically just list as many things about rural living and "the country" as you possibly can while making them rhyme:

I got a gun rack...
I got a pickup...
I drive a tractor...
I chew tobacco...
I go to rodeos...

The worst offenders of the "list song" are as follows:







This is songwriting without even trying. Jamey Johnson, arguably one of the only true "outlaw country" types that gets any mainstream radio play at all these days (But only with "In Color") made a song which is sort an "anti-list song" in which he details all of the things he's not/has not done, but if you want to see the "redneck side" of him, he'll be glad to show you:



What ever happened to country songs that tell stories? Hardly anybody in the mainstream writes like Hank Sr., Jr., or III, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Jamey Johnson, James McMurtry, or Billy Joe Shaver, or even Johnny Cash anymore for that matter. I guess there are too many people who will just bob their heads, stomp their boots, and raise their Bud bottles in the air to "I'm from the country and I'm different from you because I do x, y, or z, or I have x, y, or z." There are a couple of bright spots on country radio though:



"If diesel's worth the price of gold, it's the cheapest grain he's ever sold." - Brilliant line because it actually captures the hardship that farmers face, not just, "I'm from the country and I drive a tractor."



This one is a little light hearted, but at least it tells a good story (with a great twist at the end) and the tune is catchy.
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Valdez, Alaska
2,759 posts, read 4,430,008 times
Reputation: 2792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badfish740 View Post
I call them "list songs." You basically just list as many things about rural living and "the country" as you possibly can while making them rhyme:

I got a gun rack...
I got a pickup...
I drive a tractor...
I chew tobacco...
I go to rodeos...
Bingo. Hate that stuff. Mainstream country music may be all but dead, but there are still a lot of good singer/songwriters out there telling stories like real country singers used to. Mostly not on the radio, and a lot of it is called Alt-Country or Americana.

I like the lyrics to this one:




Quote:
Because tractors ain’t sexy and workin’ is hard
For small town people like me
And the radio’s full of rich folks singin’
‘Bout places they’ve never seen

Now I ain’t saying that their lives ain’t hard,
I’d love to hear about it sometime
But let them sing about their own life
And I’ll sing about mine

Last edited by tigre79; 01-25-2013 at 04:26 PM..
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Old 01-26-2013, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
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Tell you one thing that bugs me about some of these songs.

1- "how country feels" includes a line about cutting a path through a cornfield.

2- Then there is another song I hear sometimes, a guy can't stop thinking about his girlfriends tanktop, so they drive through somebodies cornfield.

Country songs should not be praising the destruction of anyone's crops.

IMHO singing about or praising how to destroy somebody's source of income, should be discouraged.

It is a clear indication to me that the singer has never lived on a farm, if he is singing about how to tear up a farm.
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Old 01-26-2013, 02:25 PM
 
Location: High Bridge, NJ
3,858 posts, read 8,505,164 times
Reputation: 3339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Tell you one thing that bugs me about some of these songs.

1- "how country feels" includes a line about cutting a path through a cornfield.

2- Then there is another song I hear sometimes, a guy can't stop thinking about his girlfriends tanktop, so they drive through somebodies cornfield.

Country songs should not be praising the destruction of anyone's crops.

IMHO singing about or praising how to destroy somebody's source of income, should be discouraged.

It is a clear indication to me that the singer has never lived on a farm, if he is singing about how to tear up a farm.
"What Was I Thinkin" by Dierks Bentley-he actually writes some decent stuff believe it or not. The lines you're looking for are:

Quote:
By the county line the cops were nippin on our heels
Pulled off the road and kicked into four wheel
Shut off the lights and tore through a cornfield
What was I thinkin?
That's not my favorite song by any means but you're being kind of nitpicky. Steve Earle sings about moonshining and growing marijuana in Appalachia in "Copperhead Road," Johnny Cash sings of "shooting in man in Reno, just to watch him die," Merle Haggard talks about "turning 21 in prison doin life without parole" in "Mama Tried," and Jamey Johnson sings about trading his job his wife and his piece of land for "cocaine and a *****" in "The High Cost of Livin." These are songs, not real life. None of these things should be aspired to, they're just stories, which is what songs should be. Not lists.
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Old 01-26-2013, 08:49 PM
 
208 posts, read 296,003 times
Reputation: 402
I lived until the age of eight on a farm in rural lower Michigan in the 1960s. My parents moved there from the city (Jackson) where they were from. We had a woodstove and hand pump in the kitchen, and an outhouse in the back, chickens, raspberries, a vegetable garden and an old apple orchard. But we were not farmers - we only had 6 acres. Dad worked factory jobs back in Jackson to support us.

There were a lot of wonderful things about being a kid in the country, some not so wonderful. Most families had been in the area for generations, and we were regarded as outsiders the whole time we were there. The lovely old farmhouse across the road burned down in a spectacular fire one winter night - no hydrants, and the tanker fire truck had to go back and forth to the mill pond in the nearest town for water, so they were unable to save the place. Dad fought the sparks showering onto our roof all night with a garden hose. I didn't have a lot of time for walking in rivers and rolling in hay, but I did work endless hours hoeing and pulling weeds and picking potato bugs in the garden and hauling the slop jar to the outhouse and chasing gonzo escapee chickens in the tall grass. Dad worked long shifts in town, and had a long drive morning and night, so we hardly saw him. We had one car, so we kids and my mom were stuck at home, miles from town, all the time. I hardly ever got to visit a friend. What country felt like, to me, was isolated and lonely. And I hated the chickens - stupid finger-peckers.

I remember moving into town (Vandercook Lake) five weeks into third grade, in 1967. We had inherited a tiny little house in a tight packed neighborhood when my grandfather died, and my parents had gotten tired of our country life. Suddenly I could walk to school, to stores, to the houses of classmates. I had friends for the first time. We had a flush toilet, an electric stove and central heat. We could trick-or-treat a house every 30 seconds at Halloween. I got a paper route and suddenly had money of my own. I thought I had died and gone to heaven.

Today I live on three acres in a town of 20,000 thirty miles from Cincinnati. I have fresh air, trees, and not much traffic, a little garden, and I can walk to the store or library or to a friend's house. It is a good compromise for me - a little city and a little country. There isn't one way of living that is best for everyone, or inherently more virtuous than other ways. I am in the right place for me, and pretty darn happy. I may even get chickens.
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Old 01-26-2013, 10:24 PM
 
133 posts, read 185,667 times
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I grew up on a small farm in Iowa, not big by Iowa standards at all. Turned 18 and joined the military.....14 years later i have lived all over the world......hopefully in 6ish yrs when i can retire....where will i be moving? Back to Iowa, the midwest at least. I may have had to live in the "city" while i have been in the military, but once i retire i am heading back to the "country". I love the smell of corn and alfalfa, the smell of hog %&^*, to me that's the smell of someone's hard earned money and lifestyle. I'm sick and tired of stop lights, a Starbucks on every corner, and everything that goes along with a city. Growing up, not once did my parents lock the house, or any of the cars or trucks we had sitting around the farm. Nobody everrrrr bothered anything. We could go on vacation for a week and everything would be fine, windows and doors would be unlocked the whole time. Now where i live i sleep with a gun on the nigh stand. Do i need to? No, i live in a nicer neighborhood, but i do anyway. I don't even feel comfortable sleeping with the windows open. I HATE the city and will be back in the country someday.
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