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Old 10-20-2007, 04:29 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Hi. I just thought I'd ask this in case I ever get sick of living in the city later in life. Which Midwestern state is the best place to live in a rural setting: Missouri? Illinois? Indiana? Ohio? Michigan? Iowa? Wisconsin? Minnesota?

Please give include as many reasons as to why you chose the state you chose in your explanations
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Old 10-20-2007, 06:01 PM
 
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As far as natural beauty goes, alot of Missouri, Wisconsin and Minnesota are beautiful. Eastern Iowa is also. As far as quality of life goes, the upper Midwest is a little more comfortable, and has a higher income. Missouri is nice because it is so inexpensive. The Great Lakes states have a little nicer architecture and history, but all states do well in that arena.
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Old 10-20-2007, 08:05 PM
 
Location: USA
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Indiana is boring, and the people are clannish.
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Old 10-20-2007, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
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Just curious as to why North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska was left out?

If you include them, I would live in South Dakota. The very lack of people would be the reason. But I'd live in Western South Dakota. The hunting is better.
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Old 10-20-2007, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Great Lakes region
354 posts, read 625,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgussler View Post
Just curious as to why North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska was left out?

If you include them, I would live in South Dakota. The very lack of people would be the reason. But I'd live in Western South Dakota. The hunting is better.
I agree with that - the fewer people the better.
If you aren't concerned with locating a good job, northern Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula are beautiful, with property being much, much less expensive in Michigan than Wisconsin. On the other hand, northern Wisconsin has a much more progressive feel, with most of the amenities a city dweller would consider important.
However, jobs are scarce in both areas.
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Old 10-20-2007, 10:10 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgussler View Post
Just curious as to why North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska was left out?

If you include them, I would live in South Dakota. The very lack of people would be the reason. But I'd live in Western South Dakota. The hunting is better.
Because Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota are part of the Great Plains, which in reality is an entirely different region from the Midwest. The last time I was told, the Great Plains are declining rurally, much of their crops are grown through land that had to be very heavily irrigated. I could be wrong though. In any case, Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan have a lot more going for their rural areas to my knowledge.
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Old 10-20-2007, 11:08 PM
Status: "That 80s Sound, ZTT Records!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
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Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Because Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota are part of the Great Plains, which in reality is an entirely different region from the Midwest. The last time I was told, the Great Plains are declining rurally, much of their crops are grown through land that had to be very heavily irrigated. I could be wrong though. In any case, Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan have a lot more going for their rural areas to my knowledge.
That is fairly correct. Certain areas of the Great Plains are heavily irrigated. Some areas would be western Kansas, a good portion of Nebraska, and portions of the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles. Irrigation is a little less common in SD and ND because evaporation rates are less because they are located further north in latitude. Large sections of the High Plains region is ranching country along with oil and natural gas production. Areas to the east of the Missouri River Valley tend to have more stable rural populations with more consistent rainfall. Most of the population in rural areas of ND and SD is concentrated in the bigger towns and urban areas. Rural areas are losing younger people at a very fast rate, and most small towns in the Great Plains and High Plains are basically retirement communities if they do not have many non-farm jobs.
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Old 10-21-2007, 12:46 AM
 
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The plains states (except maybe for N. Dak.) socially associate with the interior west rather than the Great Lakes / Midwest. All agricultural areas now suffer from the modern "bonanza farm", but Kansas, Nebr., et. cetera are particularly bad about them. The towns there are more isolated (geographically and socially)and there are simply fewer opportunities. Here in Mpls., it seems like half the school teachers are from the hinterlands. There is a reason for that. The difference is that, when they developed, the Great Lakes states grew more medium-sized cities. The rural areas and towns do better when there is a microregional city in close proximity. There aren't (m)any cities of consequence (50,000 - 100,000) west of Fargo. Also, and prob. most importantly, the politics on the plains are pretty conservative. I think that hurts the more rural areas.
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Old 10-21-2007, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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Originally Posted by Minnehahapolitan View Post
The plains states (except maybe for N. Dak.) socially associate with the interior west rather than the Great Lakes / Midwest.
I'm not so sure about that. I've lived in the "interior west" my whole life (CO and AZ) and most people I know would group the plains states-KS, NE, etc with the midwest. So even if that were true, that plainsmen associate themselves with the mountain west, it doesn't necessarily work the other way around.
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Old 10-21-2007, 02:09 PM
 
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I'm not saying that they are the same, but the plains states have a libertarian streak that the Old Northwest simply does not. They are still Midwestern, but analogous to the California coast and the interior of Calif. Same name, two cultures.
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