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Old 01-31-2013, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
Reputation: 19849

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RE: honeybee die-off

A friend sent me a link to an article about 16 hives dying off at the same time in Penn.

RSOE EDIS - Biological Hazard in USA on Thursday, 31 January, 2013 at 03:55 (03:55 AM) UTC. EDIS CODE: BH-20130131-38060-USA

These bees were found to contain:
bifenthrin (found in hundreds of agricultural and household pesticide products),
chlorpyrifos (used on orchards, golf courses, and crops, and banned from residential use),
cyhalothrin (found in household and commercial products like Demand, Karate, and Warrior),
and fipronil (used in over 50 products to control ants, termites, fleas and other insects, e.g., Frontline, Goliath, Nexa, and Regent).

"... According to Penn State Senior Extension Associate, Maryann Frazier, "Honey bees across the country are being exposed to a great diversity and sometimes high levels of pesticides. While the evidence associated with the Montecito die-off is not conclusive, the symptoms of colony deaths and detections of low levels of pesticides toxic to honey bees are suspicious and cause for concern."



Respectfully submitted for your education and discussion.
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Old 02-01-2013, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Hot Springs
1,299 posts, read 2,413,080 times
Reputation: 1277
The bee-hives that I have seen have all been in rural area's. Usually near a hay field or pasture where housold or ag pestisides would normally not be used. I guess I am not understanding how the Bee's would get enough exposure to kill off an entire colony.

uh
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,147 posts, read 50,318,661 times
Reputation: 19849
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncleharley View Post
The bee-hives that I have seen have all been in rural area's. Usually near a hay field or pasture where housold or ag pestisides would normally not be used. I guess I am not understanding how the Bee's would get enough exposure to kill off an entire colony.

uh
Normally dark, Italian or Caucasian honey bees will have an active radius of 10-miles from the hive. There are tricks that will allow them to actively work a radius of 20-miles.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Hot Springs
1,299 posts, read 2,413,080 times
Reputation: 1277
Wow!!!!

uh
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Old 02-02-2013, 05:08 PM
 
Location: S.W.PA
1,361 posts, read 2,542,391 times
Reputation: 1042
I thought the Colony Collapse Disorder (mentioned in the article) that has plagued honeybees for the last decade was determined to have come from a fungus found in bees imported from Australia. This sounds like it is maybe a different and more localized problem.
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Old 02-02-2013, 06:37 PM
 
Location: West Lafayette
67 posts, read 205,226 times
Reputation: 75
All four of those products have been around and in use for a long time (mid/late-1980s)...

They are toxic as hell to bees, true, but I got to believe that their use is not singular in colony collapse if the collapse is somewhat recent, i.e. last few years. There were some mites that were bad news, too, for a while.

Just playing devil's advocate. One must always be a skeptic in the world of biology.

That all said, I'm terrified at the thought of massive pollinator losses.
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,653 posts, read 13,532,634 times
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FWIW, our winter is pretty much over in South Texas. Temps are running in the 70's now and before long we'll be looking at our usual 100F+ heat. The honey bees here seem to have been real busy during our short winter as hives are on the move. I've never seen so many as we have this year. Biggest issue here is that you can't tell the difference between a normal honey bee and a killer bee. We have several folks every year killed by these varmints. But nobody kills a hive unless they are known to be killer bees. When we see them migrate, we just get real still and they generally keep moving.
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