U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-05-2013, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Hot Springs
1,299 posts, read 2,413,746 times
Reputation: 1277

Advertisements

I don't like cities because they stink. Why don't the people that live in them clean up their air?

uh
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-05-2013, 01:01 PM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
8,367 posts, read 8,721,436 times
Reputation: 5935
Maybe you just forgot to take off your sh*tkickers before you got in the pickem-up...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2013, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Orlando
8,178 posts, read 16,710,558 times
Reputation: 49786
I find this to be the opposite.

I live in a metro area of 3 mil and find that those that live in cities look down on the rural/small town people calling them redneck and uneducated.

Most small town people I know don't hate city people, they are just wary of them and don't understand living THAT close to THAT many people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2013, 03:23 PM
 
12,685 posts, read 17,018,902 times
Reputation: 24558
When I was young and had to make a living for my young family, I lived in major urban areas of the U.S. I am now retired and can choose where I want to live. I much prefer rural life.

I don't hate urban life. All life is a jungle but rural life simply has less animals per square mile; not counting the deer, pheasant and quail that wander into my front yard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2013, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Central Maine
2,867 posts, read 3,046,772 times
Reputation: 3984
Because people from the city are always moving to the country and trying to make it the city. If you want the country, come to the country and accept it. If not, stay in the city. It's that simple. And stop trying to get elected to all of the boards so that you can try and tell country people how to run their towns. They've been doing it a lot longer than you have been there, thank you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 12:02 PM
 
302 posts, read 732,114 times
Reputation: 323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Pueblo and Colorado in general have the same problem as many states, to wit, one huge metro area that has a huge population which effectively disenfranchises the voters in the rest of the state.
Even in Colorado it's one person one vote. Dirt and trees don't get to vote. The fact that things don't go the way you wanted them to in an election doesn't mean you were disenfranchised, it means you were outvoted.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 12:35 PM
Status: "Free Thinking, humanist, aestheticist available for hire" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: On the Edge of the Fringe
5,181 posts, read 4,113,574 times
Reputation: 4337
The issue for many with cities goes back to overrcrowding and the resulting crime and disease that go along with it. I recall this being brought to light by Calhoun and others in the 50's. The experiment was to take a family of rats, place them in a comfortable surrounding where they had adequet space, food, shelter and let them live there for a ffew months, measuring beaviors which would suggest anxiety as well as monitoring the rat's overall health. After a period of time, more rats were gradually introduced until the overcrowding became extreme. The behaviors noted were violence, famine, disease, and increased anxiety. They even noted loosly formed gangs of maurading rats which would go around the living area attacking and stealing food from others.

Sadly, many of these behaviors are seen in overcrowded cities and they are lacking in smaller towns.
I live on the edge of a big city but I work mostly in Tampa. I moved here last year from a smaller town in Florida.

Many people love cities because of the abundance of resources (hospitals, stores,) as well as the pre-packaged entertainment (amusement parks, zoos, malls) I am not into prepackaged entertainment, in fact I have a probably boring life by comparison and am content to have a quiet evening at home most of the time.
Which makes a small town perfect for me. I do not get bored easily.

BUT I can see where the items addressed in Calhoun's studies certainly impact city life in a negative way, and the lack of the problems which are essential to overcrowding and yet absent in rural life would be a legitimate cource of disdain to many.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 03:07 PM
 
3,764 posts, read 7,586,241 times
Reputation: 4037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I hate the oh-so-sophisticated easterners, west coasters, and some evolved westerners (so-called) who now constitute a majority in the state and who destroyed my home. May they burn in the worst chamber in Hell.
I grew up in the Chicago area
Interesting that your move from Chicago to Colorado was fine, but many others who moved into Colorado destroyed "your" home & should burn in the worst chamber of hell. Hmmmmmm In all due respect, pretty egocentric view
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,714 posts, read 8,653,707 times
Reputation: 4915
Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeKingCat View Post
The issue for many with cities goes back to overrcrowding and the resulting crime and disease that go along with it. I recall this being brought to light by Calhoun and others in the 50's. The experiment was to take a family of rats, place them in a comfortable surrounding where they had adequet space, food, shelter and let them live there for a ffew months, measuring beaviors which would suggest anxiety as well as monitoring the rat's overall health. After a period of time, more rats were gradually introduced until the overcrowding became extreme. The behaviors noted were violence, famine, disease, and increased anxiety. They even noted loosly formed gangs of maurading rats which would go around the living area attacking and stealing food from others.

Sadly, many of these behaviors are seen in overcrowded cities and they are lacking in smaller towns.
I live on the edge of a big city but I work mostly in Tampa. I moved here last year from a smaller town in Florida.

Many people love cities because of the abundance of resources (hospitals, stores,) as well as the pre-packaged entertainment (amusement parks, zoos, malls) I am not into prepackaged entertainment, in fact I have a probably boring life by comparison and am content to have a quiet evening at home most of the time.
Which makes a small town perfect for me. I do not get bored easily.

BUT I can see where the items addressed in Calhoun's studies certainly impact city life in a negative way, and the lack of the problems which are essential to overcrowding and yet absent in rural life would be a legitimate cource of disdain to many.
I'd argue that those problems you describe come from deprivation, from people, or animals, not having the resources they need or think they need to get by living a healthy life where their needs are met. Deprivation and poverty are symptomatic of urban life in many American cities so what you're saying is totally true, as is the disease issue especially if there isn't proper sanitation in place. But the amount of living space is just one minor factor. In much of the world, the dense central cities are where the rich live and the poorer people live in the less dense suburban outskirts, and it is the suburbs that have such problems because the people there are living with deprivation. People living all on top of each other doesn't naturally lead to social and behavioural breakdown if we're talking about, say, rich yuppies with full bellies and plenty of cash to go and do the things they want. Likewise, there's some really crime ridden towns and rural areas as we all know (some reservations I'm familiar with come to mind). So, what I'm saying is that I understand what you're getting at, but I also don't think we can pretend that it's a natural law or something that people can't live healthy lives with less space, it's just one small factor in a big puzzle that can sometimes even be outweighed if there's lots of other benefits. My two cents on that, and I certainly don't mean it as a rebuke of rural or small town living, I just thought nuances deserved to be pointed out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,149 posts, read 43,088,498 times
Reputation: 51738
Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
When I was young and had to make a living for my young family, I lived in major urban areas of the U.S. I am now retired and can choose where I want to live. I much prefer rural life.

I don't hate urban life. All life is a jungle but rural life simply has less animals per square mile; not counting the deer, pheasant and quail that wander into my front yard.
If locating where there were more abundant applicable employment options (what brought me to cities to begin with) were not a priority, I would choose to live rurally, even though I do love and appreciate the pros of urban life. An ideal scenario for me would be to live rurally within an easy drive of a midsize to large urban center. Enough to avail myself of the cultural amenties with ease. I live urban, now, and have for years, but my upbringing and my heart are in small towns and rural landscapes, and those are places where I'm as comfortable as comfortable can be.

It should also be noted that of all the cities I've lived in, the one that has been the most comfortable to me is the one that is by FAR the least dense, population-wise. It's big, but spread out. I do like having breathing room, even in a city...I like living in a city that feels populated, but not overcrowded. I don't have patience for overcrowding.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:11 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top