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Old 02-10-2013, 10:34 AM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,839,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
It really sounds like it is what it's supposed to be.

(That may not make sense but I'm a firm believer that if something is meant to happen, it will. The way everything is falling into place for them, I think this a 'meant-to-be' thing.)
It has been almost scary how smoothly this has come together.

Hopefully there isn't some shoe somewhere waiting to be dropped.

Last edited by Cinebar; 02-10-2013 at 10:48 AM..
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
My biggest concern for him this first year is that there is quite a bit of property up by the house and around the buildings that will need to be mowed. It's too much to do with a push mower and I don't think he'll be able to afford a riding mower for a while.
One of the things I got into when I retired was the refurbishing and restoration of antique Ford tractors. In the past 6 or 7 years, I have owned over 30 Ford 9ns, 8ns and Jubilees. For small acreage, I recommend a Ford 8n for its small upfront cost ($1,500 to $3,000), low cost of maintenance, simplicity of design and obvious long-lasting life. However, if your son has never worked around farm machinery, I would recommend the Ford Jubilee as it has a much safer pump and PTO system.

Right now I only have an 8n and a Ferguson TO30 that I use to maintain this place. I do have a late model 23hp Craftsman garden tractor (GT3000?) as well but I only use it around the house and barns when I don't feel like hooking up the tractor's 3-point finish mower. For approximately similar costs, I much prefer the older but longer lasting real tractors.

Here's a few of the 8ns I have finished in the past as well as one of my Jubilees.

Last edited by High_Plains_Retired; 12-20-2013 at 04:47 PM..
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:21 AM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,839,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
One of the things I got into when I retired was the refurbishing and restoration of antique Ford tractors. In the past 6 or 7 years, I have owned over 30 Ford 9ns, 8ns and Jubilees. For small acreage, I recommend a Ford 8n for its small upfront cost ($1,500 to $3,000), low cost of maintenance, simplicity of design and obvious long-lasting life. However, if your son has never worked around farm machinery, I would recommend the Ford Jubilee as it has a much safer pump and PTO system.

Right now I only have an 8n and a Ferguson TO30 that I use to maintain this place. I do have a late model 23hp Craftsman garden tractor (GT3000?) as well but I only use it around the house and barns when I don't feel like hooking up the tractor's 3-point finish mower. For approximately similar costs, I much prefer the older but longer lasting real tractors.

Here's a few of the 8ns I have finished in the past as well as one of my Jubilees.
Oh, my........

Those are some seriously beautiful tractors!

I LOVE old tractors, almost with a passion! It probably has something to do with those long ago memories of riding with my grandfather around his orchard on his tractor.

I've always wanted one; my property has such little level ground on it, though, that one here would be totally impractical. I hope my son has an opportunity to get one.
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
Oh, my........

Those are some seriously beautiful tractors!

I LOVE old tractors, almost with a passion! It probably has something to do with those long ago memories of riding with my grandfather around his orchard on his tractor.

I've always wanted one; my property has such little level ground on it, though, that one here would be totally impractical. I hope my son has an opportunity to get one.
Of course, out here on the Texas high plains, all we have is level ground!

I've sort of gotten away from the full restoration process as my eyesight, and patience, has deteriorated (diabetes and age). Regretfully I have sold all my pretty tractors and have just the two non-restored ones I use.

Beyond having a quiet place to retire, one of my reasons for buying this place was to have my two grandchildren experience at least once in their lives rural America. They love it out here.

Grandchildren riding on farm.

And here's one of my grand daughter on an old scooter I restored for her birthday.
Attachment 107405

Last edited by High_Plains_Retired; 12-20-2013 at 04:47 PM..
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:57 AM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,839,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
Of course, out here on the Texas high plains, all we have is level ground!

I've sort of gotten away from the full restoration process as my eyesight, and patience, has deteriorated (diabetes and age). Regretfully I have sold all my pretty tractors and have just the two non-restored ones I use.

Beyond having a quiet place to retire, one of my reasons for buying this place was to have my two grandchildren experience at least once in their lives rural America. They love it out here.

Grandchildren riding on farm.

And here's one of my grand daughter on an old scooter I restored for her birthday.
Attachment 107405
I swear that tractor in that picture is my grandfather's tractor! Funny the things we remember; my grandfather has been gone for over fifty years.

Your granddaughter is adorable on that scooter (what I can see of her under the helmet ). I'll bet they love visiting you.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:29 AM
 
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Is there electricity on in the house....or, anywhere?????

A good many of my calls are from people who "just bought the home" and have no water.

I always wonder how they fingered an inspector checked the well with no power??????

As a driller I could check the whole water system.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
I swear that tractor in that picture is my grandfather's tractor! Funny the things we remember; my grandfather has been gone for over fifty years.

Your granddaughter is adorable on that scooter (what I can see of her under the helmet ). I'll bet they love visiting you.
My grandpa, the only one I remember, lived from 1876 to 1965. I do, however, remember him well sitting in his Texas gunsmith shop.

Both my grandson and granddaughter are as red-headed as Little Orphan Annie. My granddaughter kept telling me her school friends made fun of her curly red hair. I had a tough time convincing her that they're just jealous but I must have struck a chord as this Christmas I noticed she was back to red and curls.

The trailer is a 1939/40 Ford truck bed that was given to me in bad condition and that I painted and replaced the wheels and tires so that I could use it on the farm. It has been extremely useful in getting this place back in shape, e.g., hauling limbs and old furniture, trash and junk, water for my trees and even as a work table off the tailgate.
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:12 AM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,839,058 times
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I got to thinking yesterday about my grandfather and realized my math was off - he hasn't been gone for over fifty years. He died when I was fourteen, and since I'm fifty-eight, I guess he hasn't been gone as long as what I was thinking.

Oh, well, neither here nor there - just memories, and some regrets. My grandfather was Danish and had quite an interesting life and story but farming was in his blood. He had been the manager of a rubber tree plantation in Malaya (Malaysia now), where my mother was born, and during WWII, they had to evacuate - leaving everything, including their beloved pets. My grandmother ended up in Australia with the five girls (where my parents met; my dad was in the Navy) and my grandfather was taken prisoner by the Japanese. He had one of his knee caps broken while he was a prisoner and walked with a limp for the rest of his life.

My grandparents eventually bought an orchard in the Hood River Valley of Oregon. My brothers and my cousins all remember my grandfather as being distant and grumpy but I have other memories - sitting on his lap while he tried to teach me Danish, helping him feed his chickens, and of course, riding with him on his tractor around the orchard to name a few. I tend to think that he and I had a "connection" that was unique to us and I wish I could go back and tell him how important that was (and still is) to me.

Anyway, totally off topic.......

Things are rolling right along with the farm. My son and I went to town yesterday and met one of my other sons for a late lunch, so I was able to catch up with everything.

Apparently, the mowing thing shouldn't be an issue. A guy he works with refurbishes riding lawn mowers and then re-sells them very reasonably, so he will be able to buy one from him.

The sellers had the power turned on to the property yesterday so the water can be tested today. While the water is running, my son is going to crawl under the house and look for any possible leaks. He has already been under the house (one of the advantages to the house being vacant is that he can - and has - gone over and prowled around a lot and on one of those "prowls," and on a very wet, rainy day, he crawled under the house and told me later that even as wet as it was outside, the house was totally dry underneath) but he wants to make sure none of the new flex-pipe is leaking.

Anyway, the power will only be on for a day or two; this is what they did when workmen were over putting the roof on and installing the hot water heater, pressure tank, and water filtration system.

My son is a little overwhelmed with how fast everything is moving, and barring any unforeseen glitches, they should have the key on or around March 20.

Yesterday, after we ate, we went to Goodwill. There was a pressure canner that my son was talking about buying and I didn't want him to do that because I was planning on doing something "special" for them for a farm/housewarming gift - to buy them a brand new one. So, I had to spoil my surprise and tell him that this is what I'm buying them:

Amazon.com: Presto 01781 23-Quart Pressure Canner and Cooker: Kitchen & Dining

I had originally planned on giving him one of mine (I have two) but decided to buy them a new one instead.

After we left Goodwill, we went to the feed store and they had a couple Cub Cadet riding mowers there. Not something he can afford this year but maybe some day..........

He has lots of plans. LOTS of plans (including getting married this summer - there's nothing like committing to a 30-year mortgage, I guess, to make a couple finally decide to "make it legal," ). But I was impressed with how reasonable he's being as far as not expecting to be able to get it all done in the first year; he realizes it's all going to take time.

He did bring up the goats, though. lol He does want to take some of mine over there to help manage the vegetation and said one of his first projects will be to get fencing up and to rebuild the lean-to that's on one side of the barn/chicken coop/shop for shelter for them. He also wants to get set up for chickens - which is nice, since I already have one stupid hen out here sitting on eggs and it isn't even March yet! He can have those chicks, if he wants them, as well as their stupid mother lol.

He's also really into wanting to re-use materials as much as he can. For instance, we know of a barn that collapsed several years ago and nobody is doing anything with it. It's not far from the farm and he wants to talk to the owners and see if they will let him salvage anything off it; he's willing to pay for anything he takes and he figures they will just eventually burn it, anyway.

One thing that I'm a little concerned about, though, is that when my son was over at the farm yesterday, he was talking to the neighbor and this neighbor said that the loggers told him he could cut all the firewood he wants off the stuff that was left (tops and branches, short logs, etc.). It sounded to me, the way my son told it, that this guy thinks that is an open end agreement. My son's not too concerned; he said there is plenty of wood there for both he and the neighbor to split. I guess I'm not that generous, but also, I'm concerned about the liability of having someone on the property who could possibly get hurt. *Sigh* I will have to remember, though, that this is not MY farm and not up to me to decide who can and can't come onto it; all I can do is to give my motherly advice and hope for the best.

Last edited by Cinebar; 02-12-2013 at 11:26 AM..
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Old 02-12-2013, 02:22 PM
 
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The ancestral family of the grandpa I remember came to Maryland in the middle/late 1600s I believe from Ireland. They went from Maryland where the son of the immigrant fought in the Revolutionary War, then to South Carolina, then to Florida and Georgia. From Florida/Georgia, they showed up in deep east Texas about 1857.

My grandpa really had an interesting early life where his granddad was involved in gunfight(s?) with the Texas Rangers but that is better left to the genealogy threads. He was indeed an interesting fellow. To a young fellow like me, his old gun shop with its huge roll-top desk with all it's pockets and endless stacks of cigar boxes full of small parts and antiques was a child's wonderland.

Wow! I actually see the postman outside delivering the mail in the muck left by the snow and rain we received last night. It will be a week before UPS or FedEx will dare to come down this road. Good ol' post office. We are hoping to close this week on a small house my wife inherited from her folks several years ago but this weather may slow the process.

It sounds like things are coming together quickly for your son. That's great! I want to wish him the best of luck and safety in his endeavor. It sounds like he comes from good stock.
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Old 02-12-2013, 02:39 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,839,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
It sounds like he comes from good stock.
Yes.....he does. At least on his mother's side.
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