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Old 02-16-2013, 06:21 PM
 
797 posts, read 1,146,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
My son and his girlfriend put an offer in on a farm over the weekend - a nice, solid little two-bedroom farm house (built in 1925) on 11 1/2 acres - and we just found out the offer was accepted!

I am so excited for them but I can't help but be a little nervous as well - it seems to be a pretty big commitment for a 22-year-old (his girlfriend is a year older) and I hope they didn't bite off more than they could chew (not payment wise - they got a GREAT deal) and that my son doesn't get burned out before he's thirty trying to take care of it.

The house has been empty for almost twelve years; the property was bought by a timber company and they sat on it all this time until they could harvest the timber, which they did last summer.

They put a new roof on the house, painted it, put in a new hot water heater, pressure tank, and water filtration system, insulated it and put it on the market last August. They recently dropped the price $20,000.

The house is small (only 816 square feet) but there are just the two of them and their three spoiled house cats. It could easily be added onto later.

The timber was logged at the back of the property - maybe four acres total; the rest is in rolling pasture.

It has a separate garage and what my son calls a "chicken coop." It's one of those long buildings with a lot of windows, but looking inside, it doesn't look like a chicken coop to me - more of a barn/shop thing. It needs some work but appears to be pretty solid.

When my son took me to see it a couple of weeks ago, before he had arranged to see it with a real estate agent, we were looking at the outside of the pump house and I told him that it was pretty big to be "just" a pump house and I told him that I thought that it was most likely also what I call a "canning room" - an insulated building set up to store home-canned goods (we couldn't see inside because the door was padlocked). When my son and his girlfriend went to see it a week later with the agent, guess what? I nailed it! That's exactly what it is! My son says it's big enough for a chest freezer as well.

He's so excited! He's got plans for a big garden of raised beds and a green house and he wants to raise a beef (his girlfriend's father said he would buy a steer and buy the feed for it and then they could split the beef). My son also wants to check into raising "pasture hogs" - possibly American Guinea Hogs - and raising some meat birds.

And......he wants me to sell my place and move onto the property. Not into the house but to buy a park model and set it up. I know he worries about me out here by myself when my youngest graduates high school this year and moves out and he has always talked about buying a place that I could also live on.

And, yes, the goats can come! In fact, he wants the goats. The dogs not so much but we would work around it - we would fence in a large area for them, probably using a portion of the barn/shop/coop (whatever it is) as their "house" (since I have too many dogs to fit into a park model with me). The cats, of course, are welcome, as are the chickens but I don't think he wants the 50-60 Muscovies. lol

It makes a lot of sense but I'm not sure I can do it. I like my privacy and I'm not sure about living on someone else's property - even if that someone else is my own son. He's got a spot picked out at one side of the property where there would be some trees between us that he says would be "perfect" and where I would have my own driveway; he says it would be like we were "just neighbors."

Also, this farm, while still surrounded by other farms, is much closer to "civilization" than what I am used to - I'm pretty remote out here and I like it. I'm not sure about moving closer to town.

And by selling my place, I would have a bit of a nest egg to probably see me through until, well.....until I didn't need it anymore.

Anyway, lots to think about but no decisions have to be made right away. In the meantime, I am just so happy for him and excited that at least one of my kids got the "farmer gene."

On that TINY 11 1/2 acres you're scared your son will get----------" burned out before he is thirty"

I laughed so hard I spilled my coffee !
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Old 02-16-2013, 06:31 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,843,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Wolf View Post
On that TINY 11 1/2 acres you're scared your son will get----------" burned out before he is thirty"

I laughed so hard I spilled my coffee !
Hey, I'm a mom.

Part of me is just a little concerned that maybe he should have bought a smaller place for his first experience at home ownership.

Regardless, things are moving right along. The house passed the inspection with flying colors and the water test went fine. He got all the information about the well - depth, water pressure, etc.; I can't remember the details (such as gallons per minute) but he said the water pressure is awesome.

He seems to think that things are ahead of schedule and that the original estimated closing date of March 20 may actually be a little closer than that.

He has so many plans.........

Last edited by Cinebar; 02-16-2013 at 06:42 PM..
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Old 02-17-2013, 09:06 AM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,902,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
Hey, I'm a mom.

Part of me is just a little concerned that maybe he should have bought a smaller place for his first experience at home ownership.

Regardless, things are moving right along. The house passed the inspection with flying colors and the water test went fine. He got all the information about the well - depth, water pressure, etc.; I can't remember the details (such as gallons per minute) but he said the water pressure is awesome.

He seems to think that things are ahead of schedule and that the original estimated closing date of March 20 may actually be a little closer than that.

He has so many plans.........
You are still missing the point....11 acres or, to is to small to farm.

We don't farm however, the land we live on is 100 acres......mostly medium to large trees.

I am glad they both have jobs.

Did they check the well????

Not the water....the well.

I would not buy a place unless the seller put in a new well.

The new systems all have the pumps IN the well.
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Old 02-17-2013, 09:13 AM
 
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BTW......I feel that way about the wells because I sit her and answer the phone from people who, "just bought a house and now there is no water".
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Old 02-17-2013, 09:59 AM
 
Location: CasaMo
15,597 posts, read 7,670,224 times
Reputation: 17168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
Hey, I'm a mom.

Part of me is just a little concerned that maybe he should have bought a smaller place for his first experience at home ownership.

Regardless, things are moving right along. The house passed the inspection with flying colors and the water test went fine. He got all the information about the well - depth, water pressure, etc.; I can't remember the details (such as gallons per minute) but he said the water pressure is awesome.

He seems to think that things are ahead of schedule and that the original estimated closing date of March 20 may actually be a little closer than that.

He has so many plans.........
Cinebar,

First off, I think its great that your son is buying his first place. It is an exciting time for him. I've been there myself buying my place in the country when I was only 25. Living on a place with a house and acrerage is a LOT of work. There is also a LOT of expense and time involved and I learned that very quickly, not to mention the learning curve.

If I could give any helpful advice, it would be for your son to take this one step at a time and not try to leap into it all at once. Otherwise, it will be extremely overwhelming and that'll take the fun right out of it. If there's too much going on at once, nothing gets done and ends up costing a lot more money than initially realized.

Get settled in first. Gradually adjust to the new life. Do one project at a time and cash flow the projects and not get into debt. The gardening would be a good starting point the first year. Maybe a year down the road, he could start raising the chickens. I wouldn't recommend a tractor right now.. There's more to it than just the purchase price. There's also the ownership expenses for fuel, tires, parts, maintenence (old tractors require a LOT), and not to mention the time needed to keep it running. Keep it simple for now.

Pretty much the tortoise veruse the hare analogy.
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,843,808 times
Reputation: 6461
Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
You are still missing the point....11 acres or, to is to small to farm.

We don't farm however, the land we live on is 100 acres......mostly medium to large trees.

I am glad they both have jobs.

Did they check the well????

Not the water....the well.

I would not buy a place unless the seller put in a new well.

The new systems all have the pumps IN the well.
No.....you're missing the point.

I never said that his goal is to be a full time farmer. There is absolutely no plans whatsoever for either one of them to quit their jobs; it's not an option and is not on anyone's radar. I don't know why you keep coming back to that.

And 11 1/2 acres is plenty big enough for them to have a productive garden and to raise a few animals for their own consumption - with possibly an extra one (like a cow) to sell.

As far as demanding that the sellers put in a whole new well, I've never heard of such a thing. Maybe it's common where you live but I've never known anyone who has done that. Ever.

They did a complete water pressure test. I can't remember how many gallons per minute he said it pumped but that it has great pressure.

I know about potential problems; I lived here less than a year and had to replace the pump.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoNative34 View Post
Cinebar,

First off, I think its great that your son is buying his first place. It is an exciting time for him. I've been there myself buying my place in the country when I was only 25. Living on a place with a house and acrerage is a LOT of work. There is also a LOT of expense and time involved and I learned that very quickly, not to mention the learning curve.

If I could give any helpful advice, it would be for your son to take this one step at a time and not try to leap into it all at once. Otherwise, it will be extremely overwhelming and that'll take the fun right out of it. If there's too much going on at once, nothing gets done and ends up costing a lot more money than initially realized.

Get settled in first. Gradually adjust to the new life. Do one project at a time and cash flow the projects and not get into debt. The gardening would be a good starting point the first year. Maybe a year down the road, he could start raising the chickens. I wouldn't recommend a tractor right now.. There's more to it than just the purchase price. There's also the ownership expenses for fuel, tires, parts, maintenence (old tractors require a LOT), and not to mention the time needed to keep it running. Keep it simple for now.

Pretty much the tortoise veruse the hare analogy.
I'm probably more nervous than I should be; while he has lots of plans, he seems to also be practical - maybe more so than his mom gives him credit for. I told him I'd give him some of my chickens - the ones that go broody two or three times a year and that are semi-feral. LOL He pretty much said, "thanks, but no thanks," that he won't get chickens until he has a completely enclosed and covered pen and coop set up so they're not running wild and getting into the garden and reproducing all over the place like mine do. LOL

Smart kid - he's learned from his mom's mistakes.
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:11 AM
 
797 posts, read 1,146,397 times
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Regarding a neighbor telling him he had the RIGHT to cut firewood----------------Red flags went up when I read that.
Unless that was a stipulation in the purchase agreement, I think that neighbor is " playing " your son.

I had an experience when I bought my dairy farm in 78.
A neighbor showed up and stated the previous owner had given him firewood.

I told him he should have gotten it out BEFORE closing or asked me for arangements BEFORE clasing.

Most neighbors are good.
Some you got to be carefull of..............( give an inch they'll take a foot )
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,843,808 times
Reputation: 6461
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Wolf View Post
Regarding a neighbor telling him he had the RIGHT to cut firewood----------------Red flags went up when I read that.
Unless that was a stipulation in the purchase agreement, I think that neighbor is " playing " your son.

I had an experience when I bought my dairy farm in 78.
A neighbor showed up and stated the previous owner had given him firewood.

I told him he should have gotten it out BEFORE closing or asked me for arangements BEFORE clasing.

Most neighbors are good.
Some you got to be carefull of..............( give an inch they'll take a foot )
I agree.

I'm not thrilled with it but it is my son's place and he (and his girlfriend) will have to figure out how to handle it.

I know my son said that the neighbor only has wood heat, that the neighbor inherited his place from his mother, and he doesn't think they have much money.

But I do have my concerns about it, too.

Edited to add: Unfortunately, I think because no one has lived there for so long, that neighbors may have gotten used to having access to it for whatever purpose they wanted - my son found the remains of a dressed out deer down in the logged off area.
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Old 02-18-2013, 07:55 AM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,902,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
No.....you're missing the point.

I never said that his goal is to be a full time farmer. There is absolutely no plans whatsoever for either one of them to quit their jobs; it's not an option and is not on anyone's radar. I don't know why you keep coming back to that.

And 11 1/2 acres is plenty big enough for them to have a productive garden and to raise a few animals for their own consumption - with possibly an extra one (like a cow) to sell.

As far as demanding that the sellers put in a whole new well, I've never heard of such a thing. Maybe it's common where you live but I've never known anyone who has done that. Ever.

They did a complete water pressure test. I can't remember how many gallons per minute he said it pumped but that it has great pressure.

I know about potential problems; I lived here less than a year and had to replace the pump.



I'm probably more nervous than I should be; while he has lots of plans, he seems to also be practical - maybe more so than his mom gives him credit for. I told him I'd give him some of my chickens - the ones that go broody two or three times a year and that are semi-feral. LOL He pretty much said, "thanks, but no thanks," that he won't get chickens until he has a completely enclosed and covered pen and coop set up so they're not running wild and getting into the garden and reproducing all over the place like mine do. LOL

Smart kid - he's learned from his mom's mistakes.
Hummmmmm....."my son the FARMER"!....

I wonder where I went wrong???????

Pump problems are nothing compared to well programs.

All wells have great pressure from a new tank.

My question remains.........what are they hiding?????
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Old 02-18-2013, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,154 posts, read 50,346,722 times
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Since there are people who do derive their primary income from producing food on small acreages; I have no issue with using the phrase 'farmer'. If you produce food for market, have a ball.

I have seen many times on forums like this, where guys with 1500+ acres become very upset when anyone with less than 500 acres using the phrase 'farmer'. So what makes a 'real' farm anyway? Is that like a 'real' Scotsman?



As to well drillers, sometimes you need to hire one well driller to check up on another well driller. My well was put in by a well driller with 30+ years of experience. It seemed to work fine for 3 years, but then the biologics in the water got so bad that I was not able to control it anymore with chlorine flushing. I hired a second well driller to inspect, and he found that the first well driller had not installed a pitless adapter. Instead there was a PVC elbow that led the water line from inside the casing to outside. The PVC had cracked and was letting in algae. So I dug up my water line, I re-drilled the casing hole big enough to fit a pitless adapter, and I fixed it. Now would I have done better by re-hiring the 'professional' well-driller with 30+ years of experience to re-messup my well? Or by doing it myself.



If you are happy with a well, then your happy.

If you live in a drought-prone area, there is a good possibility that aquifers may move or dry-up in which case your well may dry-up; or not. If you do not live in a drought-prone area, then never mind.

Many homes in my area do just fine for decades on 20' sandpoint wells.
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