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Old 03-09-2013, 07:08 AM
 
1,020 posts, read 2,880,384 times
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I wouldnt mind living in one, I did before when I went to college in a small town where the only industry is the small university there. If i can have a decent house, dont have to worry about money, and commute to work in 2 minutes, its good.


but in the news recently, it seems that lots of factories and other companies are shutting down, where the average small town folk goes to work, and its their bread and butter, as their next generation will work there. once those companies are gone, the towns are broke, and the people are broke.


I'm not here to bash small towns, as i see it as a way of life that some folks enjoy, but i guess this is more of a "economy" thread and the health of small towns.
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Old 03-09-2013, 08:27 AM
 
797 posts, read 1,145,952 times
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The trouble with most of those nice small towns is finding employment.

If there was employment, they wouldn't be small anymore.
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Old 03-09-2013, 09:54 AM
 
Location: USA
2,792 posts, read 6,788,250 times
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Yes many are. Unless a town has something special to attract retirees such as a lake or mountain, they just decay and decline a little more each day when mills shut down and poverty overtakes. I could name many many towns in that shape; ones that I drive through daily. Really sad.
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Old 03-09-2013, 10:26 AM
 
168 posts, read 283,637 times
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People have been saying this type of thing for a long time but I dont see it happening.

A lot of small towns have factories that can not be shipped overseas because they are involved in food processing, which unless the farms go out of business wont be going anywhere anytime soon.

I know people who work in the oil and mining industry who live in small towns but go out to work for weeks even months on end, yes they are away from their families for a long time or away from their house for a long time but they still live in a small town.
Trucking is another job where people can have a house and live in a small town but spend most of their time on the road doing their job, my stepdad does this and lives in a town with a population of less than 300.
Telecommuting is another thing where one can work from home, perhaps people that have telecommuting jobs and are sick of the large cities will move to small town?

I dont see small towns dying, just a shift in what the people in those small towns do for a living.
I do believe something should be done with regards to the manufacturing in this country, we need to bring those jobs back to the US. I dont like how we have shifted into being predominantly a service based economy.
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:18 AM
 
6,502 posts, read 5,591,402 times
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I live on the outskirts of what used to be a small "mill" and "railroad" town (borough, actually) at the early half of the last century. Both are gone. There are few job opportunities, but the influx of city "transplants" has been very minimal (which is a plus). A lot of the downtown businesses are closing, which is a minus. We just lost a furniture store, candy store, and diner, and the local used book store is going out of business. We also lost a grocery store (thank the new WalMart on the outskirts of town for that). DH and I are lucky in that we are nearing our retirement years and have good transitional jobs (the local high school, two miles away), and our house is paid off. We don't need/want shopping, restaurants, nightlife, etc, but to see so many empthy storefronts is sad.
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:45 AM
 
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I don't mean to sound harsh, but if a small town needs a poultry processing plant to stay alive, it would be better it died.

Any industry that doesn't pay enough wages to attract outsiders to move there ( besides ILLEGALS ) is not much of a benefit to that town.

(imho )
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:12 PM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,172 posts, read 17,551,897 times
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Few of the issues that have come up with telecommuting:

- High Speed Internet often does not go more then in town and/or mile or two out of town. Seems like most small town, are DSL (Wireline only), many don't have cable system, and the ones that do, don't go much past the same limits DSL does.
- Sat Internet has to long of a latency for most VPN applications to work.
- Schizophrenia Company management, Current mgmt like Telecommuting, next one hates it and tell everyone to come back and work in a cube. (look at yahoo).

My company requires you to re-apply for Telecommutes status each year. They put that in last year. Many of our telecommuters ofter the years have moved out of driving distance to work. So most people who now telecommute, are now afraid to move, if they are in small town, 1000 miles from the office and new boss says come in, then what? ...
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Old 03-09-2013, 05:26 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,815 posts, read 17,560,409 times
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I used to live in a rural area near some small towns and jobs could be a problem but its also true that some went begging for workers. My ex worked for soc security at that time and employers were complaining that they couldn't keep good people and these were industries like roofing, bricklaying, and plumbing. The guys would stay just long enough to get their first check, blow it, then disappear. I don't like to sound harsh either but sometimes poor people deserve to be. (And I'm a liberal )
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Old 03-09-2013, 05:53 PM
 
12,685 posts, read 17,018,902 times
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I've seen small towns on the Texas High Plains come and go. That scenario doesn't seem likely to change.
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Old 03-09-2013, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Table Rock Lake
971 posts, read 1,213,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
I've seen small towns on the Texas High Plains come and go. That scenario doesn't seem likely to change.
It's hard to live rural with the gas prices so high. I have been retired for about 15 years and inflation has caught up with me. 12 miles to the nearest groceries, 9 miles to the nearest gas station. I only go out once a week now. Try to stretch the gas as far as I can. Live on the lake, have boat, can't travel do the the cost of gas. IMO
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