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Old 06-27-2013, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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If the period when farmers remove corn from stalks is called the harvest, what is it called when the stalks are chopped down?

I have a September photo and a November photo of the same field. In the September photo, the corn has already been harvested but the stalks are still up so that one is titled "After the Harvest." In the November photo the stalks have been cut down so that there are only pieces left close to the ground. Trying to figure out the end of this title "After the (what?)" for the November photo.
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Old 06-28-2013, 01:18 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
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Answer... If there are still some vertical stalks and the field is trampled,,,
What is after 'foraging / grazing' It's Common to run the cattle out in the field to do some 'gleaning'.

If it is uniformly knocked down...
What is after 'Disc'ing.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Disc...J6qmiQKWooHQDw

Disc harrow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"They are also used to chop up old crops, such as cornstalks, to make the land easier to plow and to eliminate clogging in the plowing process"

nuther Corn crop question.... Is it really worth growing? It is really hard on your soils (nitrogen hog) and a pain to deal with the stalks. Lots of work (energy) for 2 good ears / stalk I quit gardening with it about 20 yrs ago. YMMV

It's the Market economy... (Yields not price) Multiply yield improvement x number of acres planted or (price) and see the revenues...
Some of my farmer friends have corn burning stoves... They don't get much use at today's prices.
A brief history of U.S. corn, in one chart


Thank goodness my car burns waste oil rather than ethanol (subject to gov impossed RES), and hopefully soon I will be burning algae fuel (non-food crop), and several harvests / yr

Let's see the PICS!!!
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Old 06-28-2013, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Thank you for your answer. I appreciate it. I do not want to post photos that I may use later in competition.
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Old 06-28-2013, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
If the period when farmers remove corn from stalks is called the harvest, what is it called when the stalks are chopped down?

I have a September photo and a November photo of the same field. In the September photo, the corn has already been harvested but the stalks are still up so that one is titled "After the Harvest." In the November photo the stalks have been cut down so that there are only pieces left close to the ground. Trying to figure out the end of this title "After the (what?)" for the November photo.
In the second photo the stalks have probably been chopped and baled. The baled stalks are fed as roughage.

Stealth is tight in that if there are a few random stalks standing then cattle have probably been turned out in that field to clean it up. But based on your description I don't think they've been disced. If they had you wouldn't see stalks chopped off at the ground. Rather you would see a mixture of soil, stalks, and roots.
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Old 07-16-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: North Liberty, IA
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...but most corn isn't harvested that way. Most corn is combined, so the stalk is cut and the ear removed (and corn shelled) as the product moves through the machine....
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Old 07-17-2013, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
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Or you can call the November pic "Corn Stubble" if you aren't married to the "After..." theme.
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Old 07-18-2013, 01:15 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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In the second photo the corn stalks are beige (dead looking) not green and maybe only a foot off the ground and even trampled looking and they almost look burned. It was the end of November in Delaware. It was a stormy day, the clouds are very dark, there is a single tree with no leaves and a red barn.

I appreciate everyone's input. Thank you.
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:59 AM
 
Location: middle tennessee
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are these old pictures? Corn is harvested by hand, "picked", and then later the dried stalks are tied into bundles, "shocked".
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Old 07-20-2013, 06:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boogie'smom View Post
are these old pictures? Corn is harvested by hand, "picked", and then later the dried stalks are tied into bundles, "shocked".
We would shalk Corn and Cane when Green,leaving the ears of Corn on,let it dry and feed it this way to Cattle.Or with Corn we would turn Cattle and Hogs into it,the Cattle didn't do a Good job of digesting Corn but Hogs did ok.

brushrunner
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Old 07-25-2013, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NLDad View Post
...but most corn isn't harvested that way. Most corn is combined, so the stalk is cut and the ear removed (and corn shelled) as the product moves through the machine....
Years ago this was a given, but modern combines - particularly John Deere models - will strip the ears while taking very little else. This minimizes the amount of chaff that runs through the machine and leaves more material behind to help control erosion and regenerate the soil or to cut and bail. Some also like to leave the stalks tall to control blowing snow in the winter.
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