U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-20-2014, 10:26 AM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,202,129 times
Reputation: 6149

Advertisements

I apologize in advance for the long posting.

I thought I'd ask this question as I sometimes see these photos of signs that say basically "this is a farm, animals make sounds, unless you can tolerate noise, don't by property next to a farm." In case you haven't seen it, here's a link (I didn't do it as an image because it's large): http://i.imgur.com/Jf9YjhO.jpg

I have pondered this because I am okay with that sentiment except for one possible exception: dog barking. For some reason, noises like roosters or goats do not bother me in the least, not even the slightest, yet the noise of a nearby dog barking for more than, say 1-3 minutes can send me into absolute convulsions. Further, it is my premise that I have the right to not have to hear that sort of noise, even if it means the other person having to get rid of the dog or have it trained by a trainer. Yet I would never assert that with other animal noises, they don't bother me at all.

I don't know why I ponder this, as in my current situation (in the country with neighbors who are usually reasonable) I typically am not having any such problems, and I enjoy peace & quiet most times. It may be because I'm just feeling out attitudes or because I may one day buy another place and I'm basically planning ahead as to how to go about it, you don't want to move into an area and then demand that the people there now cater to you, yet you want your place to be satisfactory for you.

Further, I am not a homeowner's association fan, at all, thus the very reason I'd move into the country to start with. I am very much of the conviction of live & let live and don't meddle in how someone else is living and go around "shushing" them all the time, yet at the same time I don't want someone next to me with a yapping ankle biter or a bunch of hunting dogs etc thinking that's acceptable behavior, because to me it's not.

That's the funny thing too--I used to live in the city, and when I complained about a neighbor's barking dog, I would have people tell me to move out to the country because the city is noisy. Yet, I've also heard people say that if you hate noise then move to the city because the country is full of noise. So which is it?

I've pondered this in my thoughts thus. I agree with the sign in situations like this:

(1) You move next door to someone whom you know operates a dog kennel or dog rescue operation

(2) You complain about the smell of pigs but you chose to move next door to a pig farmer

(3) You hate the sound of roosters crowing at 5 a.m. yet moved next door to a neighbor that has a very visible chicken pen

(4) Even this--you hate the sound of dogs barking yet are buying a house immediately next door to someone with a pen full of hunting dogs

In those situations, I agree with the sign.

However, if I buy a house and the person next to me seems quiet and doesn't seem to have any large amounts of dogs, and I introduce myself and tell them "I think I may buy this place next to you, it's so quiet and I am so glad I don't have to listen to those stupid barking yorkies and hound dogs anymore," and over time a quiet atmosphere is established and we both seem okay with that, yet sometime later after they go and get a dog and it barks a lot and even trespasses onto my property harassing me and they do nothing about any of it, I think that's wrong. I would think I'd have an absolute legitimate argument there, as opposed to them saying "dogs bark, that's what they do" or "we're out in the country, we're not in a home owner's association where you can complain, so tough" etc. After all, I've let them know that I like the absence of barking dog hassles and have done so BEFORE moving in and at a time when they were dogless, and that was a factor in buying the place.

Yet, if they were to go get a bunch of crowing roosters, vocal goats, mooing cows, or smelly roosters, more power to them. Heck, I even LIKE the smell of cow manure. Also, even with dog barking, it doesn't bother me if it's just for a brief bet on occasion or especially if it's "off in the distance," it only bothers me if it's someone next door and it does it a lot--say, yapping everytime it sees me in my own yard, thinking I'm intruding into its territory.

I can understand if someone sees a problem with the inconsistencies there (no complaints about roosters, complain about dogs), and also other than barking dogs I am very very much of the mentality of not bothering other people over what they're doing on their own property, I hate homeowner's associations that way and prefer the freedom of the country. However, persistent nearby dog barking is a major exception, albeit the only one.

I am thinking that, where it regards possibly buying another place in the future, I'd have to buy a huge amount, say 50 acres or so, and my house would need to be smack-dab in the middle of it, not right at the edge, and maybe the edges should have, say, thick trees or such for a "screen" or "buffer" effect so that even if I navigate to the edge of what my property is in any practical way, I'm not going to hear anything (because I'd likely not bushwhack my way through thick weeds and trees etc), and also that would help screen out a dog from seeing me on my place and going berserk over a perceived territory violation. Or another suitable choice would be this one place I saw, it was only 1.5 acres, but it was surrounded by acres & acres of pasture land full of cows, the only thing that would thus ever be next to me would be those cows, the nearest house so was far away that even if they had 12 Yorkies yapping day & night, you'd barely even be able to hear it at all.

Thoughts?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-20-2014, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
5,177 posts, read 6,001,413 times
Reputation: 8992
OK, you may be overthinking this a little as you are talking about hypothetically sometime in the future, perhaps moving to another area.

You might be borrowing trouble where there is none. I usually find I don't have time to go looking for trouble, but it's always handy right there in the morning when I get up.

There is never going to be a time when there isn't something somehwere that might/could/possibly annoy someone.

I have a place that is 160 acres, 2 miles from my nearest neighbor. Usually the only sounds I hear up there are the creek, a train whistle from a trestle 5 miles away cross country across a lot of broken country, and the wind.

That said, the original neighbor sold their place several years ago and the new owners had a kennel. It is so quiet up there I could hear the dogs every evening going nuts when they were fed, and sometimes at night when the coyotes or wolves howled and would set them off.

It could be annoying, but I didn't pay any attention to it unless someone else noticed it.

I guess it just depends on what hits your irritation button.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2014, 11:52 AM
 
Location: in here, out there
3,064 posts, read 5,735,809 times
Reputation: 5109
Dogs are not wild animals. They are domesticated pets and can be trained not to bark. You don't eat your dog.

Pigs and chickens are not trainable. You don't bother with their noise because you want more bacon McNuggets.
\
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2014, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,483 posts, read 38,395,203 times
Reputation: 23047
First, you do not have the right, if you move to the country where nearly EVERYONE has farm dogs, not to be exposed to the sound of barking dogs. Also, we have 55 acres, don't live right in the middle but close enough, and still hear the "doggy net" on still nights and every night when the coyotes sing and the dogs sing back.

Dogs are just as much a part of rural life as cows and horses and chickens and pigs - they are an integral part of the farm team. And in most cases, their barking is part of their job, letting the coyotes know what their (the dogs') territory is and not to violate it, letting their owners know that someone is coming down the quarter mile drive so they (the owners) can get dressed for visitors or come out of the barn to see who it is and greet them, letting the owner know that a cow or horse is where it should not be or that a fox is taking off with a chicken, or barking while herding the cattle into the working pens, etc. (All experiences that I have experience with.) Teaching them NOT to bark would be contrary to their job description - they are barking for a purpose important to the operation of the farm. Even the doggie net of an evening is the neighborhood dogs keeping each other informed on conditions in the area.

If you're going to make this your hill to die on, and/or make yourself a pain to your neighbors, please don't move to the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2014, 01:51 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,854 posts, read 56,232,507 times
Reputation: 32842
I agree that a barking dog, especially if it lasts all night is far more annoying than a few barnyard animals, or even farm equipment at 5am or an occasional train whistle. It just has a way of getting on your nerves, plus, the idea that the owner is hearing it and doing nothing makes your blood boil.

Regardless of where you live and how much research you do, this cannot be totally avoided. We lived in our current house for 13 years in peace, with a change in owners next door in the 9th year, and no problem. Then as their kids got older they got a Basset hound. It was not barking, buy baying, extremely annoying, all day every day and every evening until they let it into the house at night. Eventually we politely mentioned it to them and it stopped, but now we hear another dog from a few doors down that starts about 8pm and last until about 11, and can't even identify which yard it's coming from. Finding (or building) a home on 50 acres with the house smack in the middle will be difficult, unless in a very rural area with septic and well, because of the distance the utilities will have to run.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2014, 01:58 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,202,129 times
Reputation: 6149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I agree that a barking dog, especially if it lasts all night is far more annoying than a few barnyard animals, or even farm equipment at 5am or an occasional train whistle. It just has a way of getting on your nerves, plus, the idea that the owner is hearing it and doing nothing makes your blood boil.
That is exactly right. It stuns me that people don't do anything about it, when it's absolutely trainable behavior. Yet other forms of noise like stereos or firecrackers, if you're in the city anyway, will elicit an immediate response. The usual excuse I hear is that "dogs don't have an off/on switch," to which I reply "but they can be trained, or exchanged for another that's naturally quieter." (We have a dog, and I'm serious, that thing NEVER barks, and it's not a lump of coal, it can be very hyper an energetic, but he never barks. I've even seen yorkies that were that way, so I call "bull" on the notion that nothing can be done about it.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Regardless of where you live and how much research you do, this cannot be totally avoided. We lived in our current house for 13 years in peace, with a change in owners next door in the 9th year, and no problem. Then as their kids got older they got a Basset hound. It was not barking, buy baying, extremely annoying, all day every day and every evening until they let it into the house at night. Eventually we politely mentioned it to them and it stopped, but now we hear another dog from a few doors down that starts about 8pm and last until about 11, and can't even identify which yard it's coming from. Finding (or building) a home on 50 acres with the house smack in the middle will be difficult, unless in a very rural area with septic and well, because of the distance the utilities will have to run.
I truly hope that is not the case. I've been on places of the 50 acre size enough to have heard barking from bordering neighbors and it was not bothersome at all. Thus, to clarify--barking down the road doesn't typically bother me, it's more when it's next to you and right in your face. That barking I like to call "off in the horizon" barking, it doesn't faze me.

The way it currently is--most times, it's okay. We live in the woods but one house is about 50-70 yards away with a "buffer zone" of woods in between us. We aren't a HOA type of place, it's very live & let live for the most part; however, we don't OWN the land, we rent it, so there is some amount of oversight.

When I moved in, the occupants had no dogs at all, and I made a point of telling them I really enjoyed that there were no dogs around me because the last place I lived at was noisy that way and I was specifically moving to get away from that very thing. For the longest time there was no problem, until he moved out and his brother moved in, and brought in a yorkie that at times would bark at me every time I went into my front yard. If was outdoors shooting baskets at my basketball hoop, EVERY MINUTE I was out there it would yap its stupid head off. I had wished many a time that a coyote would hop their fence and eat the stupid thing. Before they had a fence, the stupid dog would harass my kids as they got off the bus, barking around their ankles and even trying to bite them, with me there fending it off with a stick.

I had talks with them about how I'm very easy going with most things, because I truly am, but that I moved here (and was here before them, if not their brother) specifically because the last place had dog barking noise and I couldn't stand it They basically told me to stick it, even though I asked nicely; I only asked tha they have the dog trained by a person who does those things. (This was not a "service" dog, this was very much just a pet.)

It only got better when I got the landlord involved (I didn't want to take it that far initially) and also when, on one night the dog wouldn't stop yapping, I let loose with the most loud and crazy demonstration of "SHUT UP! SHUT UP! SHUT UP! SHUT UP! SHUT UP! SHUT UP!" you have ever heard in your life. After that, I think I made them scared of me. I truly didn't want that, I was trying to make it clear that a LOT of barking was the sole exception of a situation where I was otherwise in total agreement about it being a "live and let live" type of place.

It probably helps that the landlord themselves, although dog lovers, also lives in a large city and has a cabin here which is specifically for the purpose of them escaping the noise of the city, and so they understand my peace & quiet desires. They even spoke of how they have to keep their dog noises down out of consideration for their neighbors there, so they regard it as a normal thing to do. For that matter, they hate the sound of guns firing, even though this is an area where everyone does it, and so the others who live here & like to target practice don't if they're around. I basically told them that the way they are about that is how I am with dog barking, and that helped them to understand.

Last edited by shyguylh; 02-20-2014 at 02:12 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2014, 03:03 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,784 posts, read 7,041,001 times
Reputation: 7473
I agree fully with TexasHorseLady concerning dogs in the country. (Sorry, can't rep you) Even if there is no livestock to protect, etc., there are other things that a dog can protect or warn of and "training" it not to bark defeats that purpose. Dogs in the country may have a different role to play than dogs in the city.

As far as "training" a dog not to bark, you apparently have no idea how to deal with a dog, and at this point you are probably past the point of accomplishing anything with the neighbor's dog. Going after it with a stick and yelling "SHUT UP, SHUT UP, SHUT UP, SHUT UP, SHUT UP" like a maniac at the dog is just going to aggravate it and it will bark anytime it senses you are in the area.

We have one neighbor whose dog runs to our property line every time it sees me in the yard or walking past their house. No idea why. I just say, in a normal voice, "It's OK, I'm in my yard" and keep right on with what I am doing and the dog will usually just turn and run back to the house. Another neighbor has a dog who ran out to the street the first time I walked past. I stopped, talked quietly to the dog and it quieted down and came up to me so I could scratch him behind the ears. Now he either ignores me or comes to get his head scratched when I walk past. A lot of it depends on how you act toward the dog as to how the dog will act toward you.

Now, as you said, "The way it currently is--most times, it's okay." and "it's very live & let live for the most part", but apparently,not so much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2014, 05:08 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,509,377 times
Reputation: 7537
Our nieghbors are a quarter mile away and the barking is very faint. No need for fifty acres, we have ten.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2014, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
8,831 posts, read 8,709,573 times
Reputation: 5339
What are you going to about the coyotes yipping and howling? And yes they are just about everywhere these days!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2014, 06:10 PM
 
1,344 posts, read 2,574,740 times
Reputation: 2470
Quote:
Originally Posted by my54ford View Post
What are you going to about the coyotes yipping and howling?
A particular area of martial arts is best. It's not Karate... it's called CHING-CHING-POW.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top