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Old 02-20-2014, 09:59 PM
 
3,279 posts, read 4,204,385 times
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I saw a post earlier talking about "rules for city people moving to the country." Rules for city folks moving to the country) I could post to that thread, but it's old, and this topic, although it relates to it, is a separate topic really.

Basically, my point before I dive in: I think at times, city people and country people should be willing to learn from each other and have an open mind, as opposed to being defensive and cocky about how "you're not in the country/city anymore" and being almost nasty about it. I say this as a person who spent my first 27 years of life, and the past 8, in the boonies, but also spent 10 years in-between in the city.

Or maybe I'm taking the post too seriously.

Let me give some examples.

When that post talked about "turn down that car stereo," well are you going to turn down your truck blasting Garth Brooks? If not, then you're out of line to ask someone to turn down their stereo in their Toyota Camry blasting Kayne West or Katy Perry, and the city people would be equally wrong to tell you "turn down that hillbilly redneck junk" if you roll into the city with the stereo blaring country tunes. There's no ordinance saying you can only play country music if you live in rural areas or only play pop if you live in the city. Heck I'm white, and I like Christian Rap artists like Lecrae and alternative power-punk bands like Stellar Kart. I'm not going to turn that off because I moved to the boonies for some quiet rural living.

In short: this isn't a country club where only people you like are allowed to live in your neighborhood.

This is my thing--having lived 27+8 years in the country, but also 10 in the city during my 20s and 30s, I try to have an open mind about the best way to do things or such without respect to whether it's country or city. For that matter, I was showing an interest in such even during my 1st 27 years in the country. It reminds me of the Travis Tritt song "Where Corn Don't Grow" near the beginning.

A lot of men around here are into hunting dogs, fishing gear, 4-wheel drive trucks, and boats. I don't care for any of those things--I like electronics, cameras & photography, and computers. Such causes me to have less in common with other guys around here, but so be it--they're still cool by me. There's nothing wrong with that. I also like bicycling, and even if people around me aren't into it, that doesn't mean I should be laughed at for bike-riding, especially on back country roads away from the major part of the traffic. "We're not used to seeing bicycles around here"--so what, that doesn't excuse you from the responsibility to watch where you're going.

You like football--fine, but I like basketball, so when the football game comes on, I'll politely and respectfully pass or I at least won't be involved in the game or know any of the players. Heck if a Britain lives in the area and likes soccer and calls it "football" as they do where he lives, so what? He's not being disrespectful to the culture, and maybe instead of replying "you're not in England anymore" how about engaging him in conversation and showing some interest in what he has to say? Treat him like a neighbor with courtesy. He is rude if he dismisses the country folk for what they like and is snotty about it, but in like manner don't dismiss him just because he isn't into the pigskin sport, that's all I'm saying.

Also, this--one person mentioned about how people like to burn bonfires in the country and if the smell of smoke bothers you, close your windows. Now let me say--I actually LIKE bonfires as well, and I have a burning barrel just like the other hicks around here, and I appreciate that the culture allows me to burn trash out here in the country, I love it.

However--what if someone has asthma or allergy problems and lives next to you and your bonfires trigger respiratory problems for them, and they moved out of the city because city smog pollution gave them problems and they figured on having fresh country air to breath? I think it would be very inconsiderate, and certainly not in the realm of "southern hospitality," for you to reply "this is the country, we like our bonfires--don't like it, tough." I think that response is selfish, frankly.

I am not saying that it isn't annoying to deal with something like that (because it is), and it's natural for one to wish their neighbor was someone else who was a fellow "good ol' boy" who was just like you in those regards, and I am not saying the neighbor complaining should have his way at the expense of everyone else around him necessarily. At the same time I would say that a truly considerate person who isn't a pompous jerk would at least show some compassion and empathy for such a person's situation, rather than being all high & mighty and defending your actions as "culture."

This posting is long, basically what I am trying to say is--there shouldn't be any drawing battle lines just because someone is from the city moving to the country not being just like the people around them. The same goes for the reverse of that as well. Have an open mind. There's nothing wrong with being country and being proud of it, not at all, but if someone in the area isn't just like you, embrace it, don't scoff at it, or else you're being precisely the same as the city slickers that talk down to country people like they're simple-minded uneducated hicks.

If I sound like someone who lives in the country and hates it, no, not at all. However I have noticed that sometimes country people can be a little overly rigid and opinionated in their attitudes and it's just as wrong as a "city slicker" talking down to country people with the whole "I don't know how you people do things out here in the STICKS, but in the city" type of tone. Just because an idea, a proposal, or a specific taste in clothing, sports or recreation comes from someone who has transported from the city, don't dismiss it based solely on that basis. Respect the differences, even if you don't embrace them, and have an open mind, especially if the city transplant isn't doing the whole "you people in the sticks are so ignorant" routine which is absolutely wrong.

To me, despite the saying, you absolutely have the right to live in Rome but NOT do as the Romans do if your tastes and/or ideas are different, so long as you aren't arrogant, stuck-up or condescending about it.

Last edited by shyguylh; 02-20-2014 at 10:09 PM..
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Old 02-26-2014, 10:49 PM
 
1,338 posts, read 990,895 times
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Rural folks don't like to look at the mirrors. Their way of thinking is the only right way of thinking. Their way of living is undoubtedly perfect, and, ultimately, they are. Same with behavior, etiquette, etc. And city folks should just shut up. And never try teach rurals anything. Want to guess why?
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Old 02-26-2014, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,785 posts, read 11,271,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusyMeAK View Post
Rural folks don't like to look at the mirrors. Their way of thinking is the only right way of thinking. Their way of living is undoubtedly perfect, and, ultimately, they are. Same with behavior, etiquette, etc. And city folks should just shut up. And never try teach rurals anything. Want to guess why?
Apparently you've never met a genuine urbanite. We call 'em city slickers.
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Old 02-27-2014, 02:57 AM
 
1,338 posts, read 990,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Apparently you've never met a genuine urbanite. We call 'em city slickers.
Well, then urban people and rural peope are even, arent's they?
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:41 AM
 
1,338 posts, read 990,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Apparently you've never met a genuine urbanite. We call 'em city slickers.
Also, I noticed how often rural people use this "us" versus "them" contradiction as if they are talking about enemies. City people don't feel such level of hatred towards newcomers. But take a look at the very popular tread - "Oh! New people are coming! they will paint their house in whatever color they want and how I will be able to survive this? I hate them even before I see them!" - this "poor Elsa" goes on and on and many of her posts are simply disgusting.
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Old 03-02-2014, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
28,422 posts, read 18,213,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusyMeAK View Post
Also, I noticed how often rural people use this "us" versus "them" contradiction as if they are talking about enemies. City people don't feel such level of hatred towards newcomers. But take a look at the very popular tread - "Oh! New people are coming! they will paint their house in whatever color they want and how I will be able to survive this? I hate them even before I see them!" - this "poor Elsa" goes on and on and many of her posts are simply disgusting.
Honestly, giving a da*n what color someone paints their house is a urban/suburban thing. Places with those pesky zoning codes and worse, home owner's associations ruled by petty little people. Rather it's telling someone what color they can paint their house, what kind of vehicle they can park in the driveway or when they can build a shop, it's not rural issue. Rural people really don't care what color you paint your place, because, if they are truly rural, the houses are far enough apart that you can't see your neighbor in the first place. 20 acres are a good start to improving neighborhoods. Now, if you are talking about little suburban places on only 1 acre, yeah, it's a different mindset.
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Old 03-03-2014, 07:18 AM
 
24,841 posts, read 32,887,308 times
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I live in a township....way out in the sticks.

35 miles from the nearest town.

Still there are MANY codes.......don't be fooled by thinking there is not.
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Old 03-03-2014, 11:25 AM
 
3,438 posts, read 4,836,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
I live in a township....way out in the sticks.

35 miles from the nearest town.

Still there are MANY codes.......don't be fooled by thinking there is not.

Yes indeed !

In the very rural area where my dairy farm was there was very strict zoning.
We were in A-40 ( A= agriculture ...........40 = minimum # of acres that were needed for a building to be erected on ( house or farm buiding )

Very strict laws on septic systems, well abandonment, and feedlot regulations.
( not just huge cattle feedlots, anyone having over 10 cattle needed a feedlot permit)

No burning of garbage allowed.
Building permits required
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Old 03-03-2014, 12:12 PM
 
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OP, did someone actually have a problem with you riding a bicycle? Or listening to your music? Or taking photos?
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Central Maine
2,867 posts, read 3,046,164 times
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Have seen urban and city get along but rarely. Depends on the individuals. Usually I find it's the urbanites that try to "domesticate" the rural people. Very seldom the other way around. Urbanites have the money, the method (get elected to rural boards and run the rural area) the "in your face I am not going away" attitude. Very seldom if ever see people from the country go to the city and try to "ruralfy" city people. I have lived in both environments.
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