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Old 02-19-2015, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,217 posts, read 17,205,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woah_amie View Post
What about to build a horse boarding facility?
If that's your goal your first order of business should be to find an area that will actually support a horse boarding facility. Colorado has them coming out their nose, so I can't imagine it would be a good area for a start-up. You'd be better off finding and buying an existing stable with an established clientele, not to mention adequate water rights (as has been stated).
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Old 02-19-2015, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,953 posts, read 10,853,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woah_amie View Post
What about to build a horse boarding facility?
horses drink 5-10 gallons of water a day. I doubt it'd be worth it.
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Old 02-19-2015, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,562,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woah_amie View Post
What about to build a horse boarding facility?
If you want a business like that, then you will have to be near one of the cities where people have disposable income but not the space to keep a horse. You need a prosperous area.

In Colorado, that means the Front Range (Pueblo, Colorado Springs, Denver, Boulder).

In Georgia, there's more choice because Georgia has numerous smaller cities.

Keep in mind that with a boarding stable, you are going to need a place for your boarders to ride their horses. A high end training facility dealing primarily with training show horses needs less riding trails than a place that's just for an employed woman who just needs a place to stable her riding horse. Ideally, you would want your site close to a park or some kind of trail system that allows horses.
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Old 02-19-2015, 12:14 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
3,788 posts, read 7,097,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post


… There are places with plenty of water, low land prices, low COL, and low taxes, but, ... those places have winter.

This year that is pretty much anywhere.
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Old 02-19-2015, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,334 posts, read 50,673,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woah_amie View Post
What about to build a horse boarding facility?
When I lived in California, I knew a few people who had those.

Where I live now, very few people have the surplus cash to afford it. During the '08 crash there were a lot of people here dumping their horses. Many times I heard the stories of anyone with a horse one day, finding two horses the next day in the pasture. As people were dropping their horses at night on anyone who already had one.

Today I know a few people who 'rescued' horses, and are now struggling to maintain them.
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Old 02-19-2015, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
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Part of that is also due to the closing of horse slaughter plants. There was no longer a bottom to the horse market, so you couldn't even give them away...
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Old 02-20-2015, 07:16 AM
 
1,417 posts, read 1,587,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Part of that is also due to the closing of horse slaughter plants. There was no longer a bottom to the horse market, so you couldn't even give them away...
Yeah, 'cause you know - they are expendable plastic toys you throw away once you are done with them...
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Old 02-20-2015, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
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I know, I remember. You're a new horse owner that's had one or two for less than 10 years, in a single area, as I recall... And so you know FAR more than people with a few decades of experience


There are hundreds of reasons someone might have to give up a 1200 pound animal that needs quite a bit of rural space. And the vast majority of horse lovers will tell you the loss of the slaughter market was devastating for horses.

It's not like suddenly all those people who would have sold (and not even TO a kill buyer, just that that sets the bottom price OF the horse market) are going to somehow keep their horses. Instead, you see exactly what Sub was talking about with dumped horses. People think dumped cats and dogs are bad! Its nothing compared to finding yourself the lucky, new owner of a horse or three.

Our sale barn got to the point that not only would they no longer sell horses (ranch country, they'd sold horses every first Saturday for as long as anyone could remember) but they had a sign hanging inside that people needed to lock their trailers when they'd come to the cattle sale. If they didn't, they might come back to find their trailer was too full of dumped horses to haul any cattle!


All of that said, there's still a market for good, well-broke, do-anything horses. So the OP's dream is valid, but stables are still a favorite dumping spot for unsellable horses...

Last edited by itsMeFred; 02-20-2015 at 08:34 AM..
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Old 02-20-2015, 02:52 PM
 
672 posts, read 638,162 times
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I personally know someone who came out of a horse auction to find a horse in her trailer. Well, horse is putting it kindly, it was a nag, it had heaves, ribs showing, hadn't had a trim in months. She took it to her vet who put it out of it's misery, but she still had to dispose of the carcass. Ended up costing her several hundred dollars, all because of an unlocked trailer.

Someone wanting to run a boarding facility had better have a good grasp of equine husbandry, you'd better know how to give shots, how to worm, how to take a horse's pulse, spot signs of colic, heaves, HYPP in quarter type horses, a variety of other illinesses, know what to feed and not feed (like green grass in the spring or grain to draft horses, or alfalfa to a "hot" horse), have a good year round hay supplier or be able to grow and mow your own, have a place to store grain and hay, have a good vet, be able to get a horse un-cast, you will need to know how to drive a tractor, because you will need one to move hay, move manure, drag your arena (which you will need if you want to attract serious riders), you will need to know trainers, you should be able to offer lessons, you will want to start a show team (if you want to attract serious riders), you will want DIRECT access to trails, you will need to know a good farrier or learn how to trim and shoe yourself, you will need to know a lot of people willing to work for peanuts mucking stalls or DIY, you will need contracts for every boarder. Because as mentioned, a lot of stables got stuck with their former boarder's horses, and the horse's medical and feed bills. A few years ago, hay was going for $8-10 a bale, and a horse can eat half a bale or more a day depending on what is available to graze and it's size. You will need to have someone on premises around the clock because horses are really good at getting hurt or sick or trying to jump a fence or getting into fights.

It is a huge undertaking with a lot of costs.
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Old 02-20-2015, 11:18 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,897 posts, read 41,577,669 times
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You wouldn't want to do horse boarding on a few acres in Colorado. Horses require a LOT of pasture / food / care. and WATER!! (for all of the above).

Find a state that has plenty of water.

If you are serious about being PROFITABLE at horse boarding, you have a steep mtn to climb. (learning curve). Buy a place next to a "horse therapy center" and go help for free, might work into a job.
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