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Old 01-11-2009, 01:52 AM
 
1,075 posts, read 3,276,837 times
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General statement - The most expensive tool you can own is the one slightly too small for the job. I suggest that if you need a tractor - get a real tractor not a "rural homeowners special". Buy used and learn to fix it yourself as part of a rural self-sufficiency kit. Replace the filters and fluids in the engine and, if very old, hoses and oil in hydraulic systems, fuel and brake lines. Avoid new and complex systems that require special dealer tools to diagnose and repair.

Local trade schools and extension service classes are a good place to learn "wrenching, welding and general repair” if you didn't grow up with this stuff. Be very careful around any machinery because it can snag a jacket and pull you into the moving parts.

NEVER, NEVER, NEVER WEAR A TIE OR A SCARF!!

I’ll second this info, way too many people get the little suburban tractors and think they can do the work of a full tractor only later getting seriously hurt or killed, those small 25 hp and under won’t do a lot just good for light stuff and when folks try to push them well then they get themselves into trouble.

Tractors and such will flop over on you in a second if your not paying attention, using it the wrong way on hils, sideways, up, down, letting a wheel drop into a hole or soft spot, cutting too close to ponds, pto shaft will gobble you up before you can blink, debri shooting out of bush hogs, guys clearing land having branches knock them completely off working about trees.

If all your going to do is small light stuff then compacts are fine, I’ve never really heard anything terrible about kubotas, hydro, shuttle, 4 wheel and your set to go, the older tractors may not have all the bells and whistles but some pretty tuff and stand up to those hard days, lots of utility companies and cities have some old cases still running around.
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Old 01-11-2009, 08:54 AM
 
1,291 posts, read 2,614,014 times
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Did someone say tractor?

It's a 29 HP New Holland, one of my very best investments.

If you buy a tractor make sure it has a ROPS and seatbelt!
Attached Thumbnails
Anyone Regret Buying a small tractor... if so what would you do different?-november-2nd-2008-032.jpg  

Last edited by Inoxkeeper; 01-11-2009 at 09:31 AM..
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,307 posts, read 50,622,639 times
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I would only wish that I could have found a track-crawler that had pontoons, with a loader and backhoe, to fit within my budget.

But I couldn't so this is it.
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Old 01-14-2009, 05:39 PM
 
12,686 posts, read 17,122,822 times
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Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
I bought a Kubota BX23 a couple of years ago and sometimes I find that I'm pushing it a little too hard or asking more than it was designed for.

I'm interested to hear your experiences with small, say under 25 hp estate tractors... both good and bad.
As one who restores, and uses, Ford 8ns (built between 1947-1952) as a retirement hobby, this thread caught my eye. Rated at approximately 26 horse power, the little Ford N-series tractors have proven themselves to be almost indestructible and are still found in great numbers throughout the eastern and southeastern US where they were, and still are, used on small farms and home places. The tractors are extremely inexpensive to use, very simple to repair and their parts remain very plentiful and cheap. The last of the N-series was the 8n which now sells across the U.S. from anywhere from $700 to $4500 depending upon its condition and location.

These tractors do not have ROP and many of the other safety features found on modern tractors. Many people in the past have died by turning one over on themselves. However, as an inexpensive alternative to a $13,000 New Holland TC-30, they remain much in demand.

Here's one that I finished a few years ago:


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Old 01-14-2009, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,729 posts, read 8,240,027 times
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NICE looking Ford! mine isn't anywhere near that pretty, and I don't know what year it is. As near as I can figure it is 1941 or later, but earlier than 1944, with a 1950 engine, but it has a front mount distributor. I also have a Dearborn model 19-8 trip bucket loader for it, but not mounted.
the one thing the Ford convinced me of, is that my next tractor WILL have pressure down on the three-point AND on the loader! Four wheel drive would be nice, too.
IF I can ever get the Ford and the loader sold, I will be looking for a better unit. The 20 HP four wheel drive diesel from Northern Tool looks pretty good, and it is only about $9500 with loader, no shipping charges!
The Ford has to go first, though!
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Old 01-15-2009, 08:43 AM
 
1,291 posts, read 2,614,014 times
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[quote=High_Plains_Retired;6997653]As one who restores, and uses, Ford 8ns (built between 1947-1952) as a retirement hobby, this thread caught my eye. Rated at approximately 26 horse power, the little Ford N-series tractors have proven themselves to be almost indestructible and are still found in great numbers throughout the eastern and southeastern US where they were, and still are, used on small farms and home places. The tractors are extremely inexpensive to use, very simple to repair and their parts remain very plentiful and cheap. The last of the N-series was the 8n which now sells across the U.S. from anywhere from $700 to $4500 depending upon its condition and location.

These tractors do not have ROP and many of the other safety features found on modern tractors. Many people in the past have died by turning one over on themselves. However, as an inexpensive alternative to a $13,000 New Holland TC-30, they remain much in demand.

I've been seeing a lot of 8N's on Craigslist. I have been trying to justify getting one to have as a second tractor but my place is pretty hilly and 2WD tractors may not be the best fit. Have you seen the new one? It's gorgeous and will be available this spring.
Attached Thumbnails
Anyone Regret Buying a small tractor... if so what would you do different?-boomer-8n2.jpg   Anyone Regret Buying a small tractor... if so what would you do different?-b8n.jpg  
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Old 01-15-2009, 09:48 AM
 
12,686 posts, read 17,122,822 times
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[quote=Inoxkeeper;7005548]
Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
I've been seeing a lot of 8N's on Craigslist. I have been trying to justify getting one to have as a second tractor but my place is pretty hilly and 2WD tractors may not be the best fit. Have you seen the new one? It's gorgeous and will be available this spring.
Well look at that! I must be living a sheltered life as I had not seen this tractor. Who is producing it and do you know the approximate MSRP? I just bought a 20-acre farm in west Texas and had wanted to "step up" to a newer and more powerful tractor than my 8ns. Maybe this will be the one?
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Old 01-15-2009, 10:03 AM
 
Location: NW Nevada
14,623 posts, read 12,062,891 times
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Nice 8N up above! I bought a New Holland TC24DA and LOVE the little bugger. I call it the "Smurf". Lol it gets the job done. I use it for my home and business both and have no complaints whatsoever other than all the silly safety switches. I have the laoder and backhoe set up and it does everthing I need it to do. I like it because a lot of the places I need to dig are in tight spots and I can get it in where a bigger hoe can't get to. Beats a shovel any day.
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Old 01-15-2009, 10:04 AM
 
12,686 posts, read 17,122,822 times
Reputation: 24583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redraven View Post
NICE looking Ford! mine isn't anywhere near that pretty, and I don't know what year it is. As near as I can figure it is 1941 or later, but earlier than 1944, with a 1950 engine, but it has a front mount distributor. I also have a Dearborn model 19-8 trip bucket loader for it, but not mounted.
the one thing the Ford convinced me of, is that my next tractor WILL have pressure down on the three-point AND on the loader! Four wheel drive would be nice, too.
IF I can ever get the Ford and the loader sold, I will be looking for a better unit. The 20 HP four wheel drive diesel from Northern Tool looks pretty good, and it is only about $9500 with loader, no shipping charges!
The Ford has to go first, though!
You may have a 9N or a 2n body. Ford named the N-series models by their manufacture start dates, i.e., a 9N began being manufactured in 1939, a 2N in 1942, and 8Ns in 1948 (although this model was actually introduced in 1947).

At least four hydraulic cylinders on a loader is nice and l totally agree on the need for downward pressure on the 3-point. It doesn't matter when dragging a shredder but a drag blade on a N-series will hop skip and jump across rocks or hard ground.
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Old 01-15-2009, 10:08 AM
 
1,291 posts, read 2,614,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
You may have a 9N or a 2n body. Ford named the N-series models by their manufacture start dates, i.e., a 9N began being manufactured in 1939, a 2N in 1942, and 8Ns in 1948 (although this model was actually introduced in 1947).

At least four hydraulic cylinders on a loader is nice and l totally agree on the need for downward pressure on the 3-point. It doesn't matter when dragging a shredder but a drag blade on a N-series will hop skip and jump across rocks or hard ground.
It can be had from your local New Holland dealer.

I am sending you a link via PM with more detail.
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