U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-15-2009, 10:20 AM
 
12,686 posts, read 17,110,440 times
Reputation: 24583

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inoxkeeper View Post
It can be had from your local New Holland dealer.

I am sending you a link via PM with more detail.
Got it and thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-16-2009, 03:53 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,169,624 times
Reputation: 1506
Children, children, children...I'm still waiting to see a tractor on this thread. Here is a real tractor that can do a wee bit of work.



I am just kidding of course though it is scary what this new 400 hp unit will do. Dragging a 33 foot disc behind it, we were able to plant 800 acres of corn last spring using only 400 gallons of fuel. But as I said, I am just ribbing you guys some. I needed to show that I know a thing or two about tractors before I said this, and that's rebuffing the comment about size. The tractor I use the most is actually a 25 hp Kubota.

For 90% of what I do, its more then enough and its saving grace is its smaller size. I do a lot of logging so I like the light weight and ease of getting around in the woods. A lot of people think more hp and more throttle will get you out of trouble, but that is not the case...especially in the woods. It's all about finesse and traction...too much hp just breaks stuff.I like my small tractor because I can get around in tight spots, and yet when I am done logging, the woodlot looks clean and neat and that is VERY important to me.

I also like the fuel consumption. It takes me 2 days to get out a load of wood, but do the math. I burn 10 gallons of fuel to get out 12 cords of wood. When I used a skidder I was burning 70 gallons of fuel to get out the 12 cords of wood...that is a 240 dollar difference assuming $ per gallon for diesel fuel.

There are other factors as well, but ultimately you must match the tractor to the work being performed. To simply say that bigger is always better is just silly. Despite having driven every tractor imaginable and from every maker, my next tractor purchase will actually be an estate tractor to fill a niche that I have. My current tractor line up is actually too big and that includes this little guy that does 90% of my work load.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2009, 08:38 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,761,838 times
Reputation: 8171
whenever I see the words---"tractor" and "Kubota" mentioned together, I always think the person is using an oxymoron in his sentence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2009, 09:24 AM
 
1,291 posts, read 2,612,912 times
Reputation: 1264
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
Children, children, children...I'm still waiting to see a tractor on this thread. Here is a real tractor that can do a wee bit of work.



I am just kidding of course though it is scary what this new 400 hp unit will do. Dragging a 33 foot disc behind it, we were able to plant 800 acres of corn last spring using only 400 gallons of fuel. But as I said, I am just ribbing you guys some. I needed to show that I know a thing or two about tractors before I said this, and that's rebuffing the comment about size. The tractor I use the most is actually a 25 hp Kubota.

For 90% of what I do, its more then enough and its saving grace is its smaller size. I do a lot of logging so I like the light weight and ease of getting around in the woods. A lot of people think more hp and more throttle will get you out of trouble, but that is not the case...especially in the woods. It's all about finesse and traction...too much hp just breaks stuff.I like my small tractor because I can get around in tight spots, and yet when I am done logging, the woodlot looks clean and neat and that is VERY important to me.

I also like the fuel consumption. It takes me 2 days to get out a load of wood, but do the math. I burn 10 gallons of fuel to get out 12 cords of wood. When I used a skidder I was burning 70 gallons of fuel to get out the 12 cords of wood...that is a 240 dollar difference assuming $ per gallon for diesel fuel.

There are other factors as well, but ultimately you must match the tractor to the work being performed. To simply say that bigger is always better is just silly. Despite having driven every tractor imaginable and from every maker, my next tractor purchase will actually be an estate tractor to fill a niche that I have. My current tractor line up is actually too big and that includes this little guy that does 90% of my work load.
I was going to say something about the better fuel mileage I get with my TC29 but then I saw your Kubota. I bet that big boy is fun to turn around in a tite spot.

Marmac, what's up with the "dis"ing of the Orange tractor line? They have a pretty good rep with the CUT and SCUT crowd.

I prefer Blue but Orange isn't bad. Oh, and don't say it's U.S. made v. Japan made, most all CUTS and SCUTS are made off shore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2009, 09:42 AM
 
12,686 posts, read 17,110,440 times
Reputation: 24583
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
whenever I see the words---"tractor" and "Kubota" mentioned together, I always think the person is using an oxymoron in his sentence.
Lol! Not to change this rare C-D topic on tractors but I used to think that about cars and Toyota until I owned one. I believe Kubotas have done really well as small tractors. However, I do have to admit I've only owned one Japanese-built tractor and that was a Ford 1710. I believe that tractor was built by Shibaura. It proved out to be a good machine. Here's a pic of that particular tractor.

Last edited by High_Plains_Retired; 12-20-2013 at 04:48 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2009, 10:16 AM
 
1,291 posts, read 2,612,912 times
Reputation: 1264
My TC29 was built by Shibaura, there's a pix of it back up this thread.

Tractor talk is good! I spend way too much time at tractorbynet
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2009, 10:49 AM
 
12,686 posts, read 17,110,440 times
Reputation: 24583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inoxkeeper View Post
My TC29 was built by Shibaura, there's a pix of it back up this thread.

Tractor talk is good! I spend way too much time at tractorbynet
Yes, I hang out at times at Yesterday's Tractors but mostly when I get stuck on a problem. However, there's not too many places an 8N problem can hide from me anymore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2009, 12:14 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,761,838 times
Reputation: 8171
(speaking of 8N Fords) I grew up on a farm in Minnesota and we were one of the last farms to get a tractor (1958)

We ran the farm with 4 work horses
My dad, 68 at the time, bought a 1949 8N Ford(He loved it)

Since all our neighbors had JD B's and A's , Farmall H's and M's, I thought it was too small and limited for what we needed it for---------our main tractor.

The 8N was amazing as long as you had mounted 3 point equipment (plow) to use.
When I got a job right out of high school, I bought a 501 brand new mower( a few years later)

Long story-------good tractor-------limited by its light weight-----my dad loved it, and thus I kept it til after he died in 1973.

I wished my dad could have bought a Ford NAA/ Jubile ,or an 860 but the money wasn't available.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2009, 02:54 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,169,624 times
Reputation: 1506
We have had our share of tractors, and over the years have had 2N's, 8n's and for many years the tractor I grew up with the Ford 900.

They had some good features like their weight...for their size I felt they were quite heavy. Gearing was probably their best feature, with the gears being right where you wanted them. In fact back when we planted 400 acres of potatoes (a lot back then) the ol 900 Ford would be dragging a 2 bottom plow in 3rd gear to get the job done.

Another good thing about the Ford's of that era was their popularity created options for farmers. I know my Grandfather always kicked himself for not buying the 4 x 4 attachment that took the pto and drove a front X making the tractor into four wheel drive.

Of course being farmers/loggers, working in the woods was tough with this tractor so we did have lags for it. This made that tractor into a tank (see picture) that would pull a lot of wood out.

Overall I liked the Ford 900. It was my first tractor and being a diesel with a wide front end, it was also quite rare. Only 1500 were made according to my dealer. Ultimately the tractor died and so we scrapped it out and bought a Kubota, which I must say is an improvement.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2009, 03:04 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,169,624 times
Reputation: 1506
When I went looking for a small tractor to work around the house, I was looking for a Ford as that was what we always had for a tractor in this size range. Obviously Ford no longer makes tractors so ultimately it came down between New Holland and Kubota.

I must say I was very leery of Kubota, but its hard to ignore a 5000 dollar price difference on the same size tractor. The salesman told me it was "too small", but I bought it anyway mostly because its all I had money for.

The original poster asked if anyone regretted buying a small unit, and I must say that isn't the case with me. I really thought the smaller tractor would be useless, but its incredible where this tractor will go and what it will pull. I must admit that I have beat on this tractor at times, but its always held up, and after 10 years, I have yet to break anything on it. As hard as I have used it, that really is a testament to its strength.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top