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Old 05-26-2016, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
4,147 posts, read 3,806,021 times
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The cost to drill a new well depends on how high the water table is. I'm in the Pocono Mountains of PA and we have a very high water table here. We have spring water collected in a cistern up the mountain which is gravity-fed to the house, with a jet pump and pressure tank to maintain reasonably constant pressure. We can do without the jet pump when the power is out.


We have private sewer service and it's a pressure system so we are required to pump "product" into the system. A new pump costs about $2,000.00 installed. The monthly bill for sewer alone is $45.00.
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Old 05-26-2016, 12:11 PM
NDL
Status: "What's your Southern appreciation story?" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Greenville, SC
3,439 posts, read 3,862,378 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
The cost to drill a new well depends on how high the water table is. I'm in the Pocono Mountains of PA and we have a very high water table here. We have spring water collected in a cistern up the mountain which is gravity-fed to the house, with a jet pump and pressure tank to maintain reasonably constant pressure. We can do without the jet pump when the power is out.


We have private sewer service and it's a pressure system so we are required to pump "product" into the system. A new pump costs about $2,000.00 installed. The monthly bill for sewer alone is $45.00.
Some of the best water available anywhere...Pocono Mountains

Are you in a dense development, that you have to sign on to sewer service?
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Old 05-26-2016, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Posting from my space yacht.
8,463 posts, read 3,457,265 times
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I live in New Hampshire and I have a septic system, with city water. I can't tell you about having a well but as far as my water bill goes, we get charged quaterly instead of monthly. Our quarterly bill typically comes in at around $60-$70, with a high of a little over $80.


As far as septic goes, we have been at our current residence about 3 years and got it pumped once so far, which cost about $300 but that included digging in the snow. The guy who pumped it said we ought to get it pumped every other year. I think we could get away with pumping it less than that though. I'll probably have a different company pump it at the 2 year mark and ask them how full it was.


Many folks go over 5 years between pumps. I know some people who claim to have never pumped their system at all. I can tell you that one house we were thinking of buying at one point needed to have its septic system replaced and it was estimated to cost around $25,000.
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Old 05-26-2016, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
4,147 posts, read 3,806,021 times
Reputation: 7716
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDL View Post
Some of the best water available anywhere...Pocono Mountains

Are you in a dense development, that you have to sign on to sewer service?

*Sigh* it was my wife's idea to hook up to the sewer. We are on a public road in an old farm house and we had a cesspool -- I say again: cesspool -- before hooking up to the private sewer system. I guess she thought it was "icky" or something.


But at least we still have the spring water. In fact we are the last family in our village with spring water. The old water company that borders us went belly up years ago and everyone either drilled wells or hooked up to the public/private water system.
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Old 05-26-2016, 10:46 PM
NDL
Status: "What's your Southern appreciation story?" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Greenville, SC
3,439 posts, read 3,862,378 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
*Sigh* it was my wife's idea to hook up to the sewer. We are on a public road in an old farm house and we had a cesspool -- I say again: cesspool -- before hooking up to the private sewer system. I guess she thought it was "icky" or something.


But at least we still have the spring water. In fact we are the last family in our village with spring water. The old water company that borders us went belly up years ago and everyone either drilled wells or hooked up to the public/private water system.
Its an unusual arrangement, but if it works .

Your part of the Country is one of the most beautiful. I gotta get myself back there for a visit...
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Old 05-27-2016, 12:52 PM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
3,401 posts, read 3,356,026 times
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Thumbs up My private well and septic experiences in NH

Private residential wells in NH tend to be deep into bedrock, and water may be clean but acidic, carrying with it lots of dissolved minerals.

Deep wells mean a bigger pump and higher initial, service, and replacement costs. And a well deep in bedrock is less likely to pick up surface contaminants, but will have more minerals (e.g. iron, arsenic, etc). The water may be acidic.

Shallow bedrock can also complicate septic installation. For example, my system has two gravity fed tanks, with the actual leach field being 400' downhill from the house itself. The second tank almost never needs to be pumped, and provides extra protection to the leach field, so don't think that a more complex gravity-fed system is always a bad thing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by whocares811 View Post
We are a Littleton, Colorado couple who currently pay an average of $75.00 a month for water and sanitation. We are contemplating a move to a small town in New Hampshire, and so we would appreciate some information about the costs and advantages/disadvantages of well and septic. Assuming we buy a house with existing well and septic systems that would need to be repaired and replaced, what is a ballpark price to repair each of these, and how often can we expect to need to have them repaired in the next 20 years? Also, for those of you who have experienced both public and private systems, which do you prefer, and why?
I'm in New Hampshire on private well and septic; with the exception of a few Nashua and Manchester residents, everybody I know in the state is also. In my experience, the average annual cost is about the same, except that private well and septic expenses are more sporadic, so you need to have a rainy day fund for the unexpected well pump or pressure tank replacement.

One downside to private well water is the need for a water softener -- sometimes it's not because the water is "hard", but rather to remove undesirable minerals (iron) or to deal with acidic water.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:33 PM
 
24,839 posts, read 33,064,620 times
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The subject of wells is a hard one to post about..........there are many kinds of wells.

I drill 5"PVC..........and even then there are rock wells and screed wells.

Either one if grouted right nothing is getting in there from the top.

Then there are different pumping systems.........I like SQE........but, they are expensive.

Talk to your local health department..........they know their area.

Public Water and Sewer vs. Well and Septic-pict0261.jpg

This is what it takes to drill a well.
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Old 05-27-2016, 02:33 PM
 
5,694 posts, read 6,142,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whocares811 View Post
We are a Littleton, Colorado couple who currently pay an average of $75.00 a month for water and sanitation. We are contemplating a move to a small town in New Hampshire, and so we would appreciate some information about the costs and advantages/disadvantages of well and septic.

As stated above there are different kinds of wells.
Most home wells (not all) are artesian or drilled wells.
And you have to understand gallons per minute.
My last drilled well is over 1,000 feet.
The depth varies from property to property.
Most well drillers charge by the foot. While others provide a fixed price. It's a gamble either way.


In finding a home with a septic system. Obtain a copy of the septic system design. If the seller does not have a copy make them go to DES in Concord, NH and obtain a copy. Since the early 1980's all septic systems have to be recorded at DES. If the septic is an older system, well, it could have been constructed incorrectly and problems could arise. Here you should hire a professional designer to examine what is there. In the olden days people would just dig a hole and put some pipes in and voila - a septic system. While others would hire someone with a backhoe and again - voila - a septic system. That may or may not have been done correctly.


Your best bet is a gravity fed septic system. The tank in yard is fed by gravity. If you live on a hilly area there may be a pump. That pump can and does fail. And usually in January. Good luck.
Some idiots will let trees grow on the leach field. Again, good luck.


A typical home inspector is not qualified to advise on the well or septic system. Hire a dedicated professional.
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Old 05-27-2016, 08:05 PM
 
3,081 posts, read 1,161,032 times
Reputation: 4449
Quote:
Originally Posted by whocares811 View Post
We are a Littleton, Colorado couple who currently pay an average of $75.00 a month for water and sanitation. We are contemplating a move to a small town in New Hampshire, and so we would appreciate some information about the costs and advantages/disadvantages of well and septic.

Assuming we buy a house with existing well and septic systems that would need to be repaired and replaced, what is a ballpark price to repair each of these, and how often can we expect to need to have them repaired in the next 20 years?

Also, for those of you who have experienced both public and private systems, which do you prefer, and why?

Thanks so much!!
I can't speak to the cost of repairs but what I like most about being on my own well and septic is that should the power go out for a prolonged period, I still have limitless clean water (via handpump) that doesn't need filtering and toilets that work after we add water.
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Old 05-29-2016, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Southern Colorado
3,682 posts, read 1,933,842 times
Reputation: 4754
Dissolved minerals make the water alkaline....not acidic. Acidic drinking water is a bit rare and generally quite undesirable. Phosphates from a septic system that is too close and nitrates from decomposed flora, fauna, and metabolic byproducts will act to make water acidic.

Alkaline water is normal and healthy. Acidic water is generally a bad thing and would require scientific testing to determine the cause of the acidic conditions.

"tend to be deep into bedrock, and water may be clean but acidic, carrying with it lots of dissolved minerals." As an owner of a water business for over two decades....this statement is quite startling. It is mostly calcium that makes water alkaline. Calcium is an extremely common mineral and a large part of a typical rock....such as granite or gneiss or basalt. Silicone, iron, and magnesium are some other very common minerals.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
Private residential wells in NH tend to be deep into bedrock, and water may be clean but acidic, carrying with it lots of dissolved minerals.

Deep wells mean a bigger pump and higher initial, service, and replacement costs. And a well deep in bedrock is less likely to pick up surface contaminants, but will have more minerals (e.g. iron, arsenic, etc). The water may be acidic.

Shallow bedrock can also complicate septic installation. For example, my system has two gravity fed tanks, with the actual leach field being 400' downhill from the house itself. The second tank almost never needs to be pumped, and provides extra protection to the leach field, so don't think that a more complex gravity-fed system is always a bad thing.



I'm in New Hampshire on private well and septic; with the exception of a few Nashua and Manchester residents, everybody I know in the state is also. In my experience, the average annual cost is about the same, except that private well and septic expenses are more sporadic, so you need to have a rainy day fund for the unexpected well pump or pressure tank replacement.

One downside to private well water is the need for a water softener -- sometimes it's not because the water is "hard", but rather to remove undesirable minerals (iron) or to deal with acidic water.
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