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Old 02-23-2008, 03:23 PM
 
Location: bumcrack Nebraska
438 posts, read 1,395,093 times
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My husband, three kids, and I will be moving in April to SE Nebraska. We've been looking online at properties in the area and have found a few we're interested in. Some are in a town of about 3300 people. A couple are in a town of about 300 people. Some are way out in the country with acreage. Can anyone here help compare and contrast living in any of these situations? Has anyone gone to school with around 20 people/grade? Is it really as bad as my husband tells me it is? (He graduated with 24 people.) I attended high school with 2200 other kids and hated it. I'm just looking for perspectives on living in a decent sized town, a really small town, and living out in the country. Thanks!
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Old 02-23-2008, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
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If Nebraska is the only state you are interested in, you might want to have this post moved to the Nebraska forum.

If you are asking the question in a more general sense, you're bound to get some varied replies here. I didn't go to a school w/20 other young people, but like you went to a school that graduated more than 5,000 in high school, but I have lived in a town, a small town and now live in a very rural community--no stores, no public transport, farms and open spaces.

I think the three are distinctly different. If you want that small community feeling you might try the middle version: a small town with access, somewhat larger schools, and some amenities.
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Old 02-23-2008, 03:42 PM
 
Location: bumcrack Nebraska
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I was looking for a more general reply. I've already asked more specific questions on the Nebraska forum.
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Old 02-23-2008, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Long Island
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Hi, Momlady,
We recently moved to a small rural community (2000 people). Regarding schools, my kids go to a school with 200 kids, pre-k thru 6th. The teachers and the principal know every kid's name, who their siblings are, who (whether parent, grandparent, older sibling) picks the children up from school. We are fortunate to have all the amenities of a big city school, but a small student/teacher ratio. Personally, this works for my children and for my husband and me. Just so you know, hubby went to school in NYC!
As to living in a rural area, you do have to drive farther (and plan ahead) for food shopping, etc. Additionally, access to health care may be more difficult. It's true, we don't have fast food restaurants in the area, but I consider this a big plus! Although on occasion, I do miss getting pizza delivered. Living out here is a lifestyle choice. Hope this helps you make a choice that works for you!
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Old 02-23-2008, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,189 posts, read 25,084,294 times
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Then your in the right place.

Quote:
Originally Posted by momlady530 View Post
I was looking for a more general reply. I've already asked more specific questions on the Nebraska forum.
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Old 02-23-2008, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Maine
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I live in a small town of 67 residents. My daughter was in a class of six in elementary school. The school combines grades so there were 10 kids in her 7/8 class last year. The individual time between student and teacher is excellent. The standards are much higher in this small school than in a neighboring larger school because teachers have more time to concentrate on individuals rather than classes.

This year my daughter is in a high school with 214 students. As kensgirl said, when the school is small the staff knows who's who.

Making the transition to rural living took a while. There's a variety store 10 miles from here, WalMart 30 miles and everything else is 100 miles. You have to be better organized when you live out of town. I stopped at the post office at 7:45 one morning to get the mail only to discover it doesn't open til 8:30 am.

The kids learned to entertain themselves with their friends without hanging out at the mall like I did when I was a teenager. They're playing old fashioned games like hide and seek (there are limits to this when they get older!), hanging out at the stone fireplace and cooking hotdogs on sticks, fishing, etc. Parents send notes that say their kids won't be in school tomorrow because it's opening day of hunting season. Teachers sometimes call in to say they'll be late because they got their deer that morning and have to take care of it. It's a lot different out here. In many ways living rurally is more civilized than living "in civilization."
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Old 02-24-2008, 01:08 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
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I grew up in a town of 11,000 people in Eastern New Mexico near the Texas border.We had a small university of 4,000 kids,a few fast food chains,a wal-mart,and not too much else, just the basics of a small town.The high school has about 800 kids,but did not go to school here.We partied alot,cruised around town and hung out at local businesses in the parking lot.We also spent alot of time in the country enjoying the open-ness,exploring and crusing all the dirt roads seeing where we would end up.

For any real shopping or dining we had to go to Clovis(pop.32,000) which is 20 miles away or to Lubbock or Amarillo,TX both an hour and a half away.

I went to a school in a town called Floyd about 15 miles away.Floyd is a very very tiny town with only a post office,a school,a volunteer fire dept. and a few houses.The school was preschool through 12 and the chances for learning was much better and the school was much more confortable.

I live in Albququerque now(pop 500,000) and I love it but I really miss the small town and the country.Im glad I grew up where I did.When I get older I want to move to a small town and live out in the country,I think the city would be too much for me when Im older dealing with all the traffic,Im gonna want the old rural peaceful lifestyle back,I know it.
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Old 02-24-2008, 10:14 AM
 
Location: bumcrack Nebraska
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Thank you so much for the responses. This is exactly what I was looking for.
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Old 02-24-2008, 02:23 PM
 
11,961 posts, read 13,017,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by momlady530 View Post
My husband, three kids, and I will be moving in April to SE Nebraska. We've been looking online at properties in the area and have found a few we're interested in. Some are in a town of about 3300 people. A couple are in a town of about 300 people. Some are way out in the country with acreage. Can anyone here help compare and contrast living in any of these situations? Has anyone gone to school with around 20 people/grade? Is it really as bad as my husband tells me it is? (He graduated with 24 people.) I attended high school with 2200 other kids and hated it. I'm just looking for perspectives on living in a decent sized town, a really small town, and living out in the country. Thanks!
I'd like to address the part of your question about relative distances in rural, really small town, or small town.
I think its got more to do with your own abilities to be self sufficient and your personal need for human interaction. These things can only be decided when you look inside first. Once that's decided, the other decisions should be much easier to make.
I have no problem letting 2 weeks pass without speaking to another human being. Other people would get depressed. My skill set is limited in the woods, so I can't stray too far from homestead the way a survivalist could. I know my limits, and I could learn more in that direction but I'd rather learn other things. I'm also experienced in emergency medical response, a vital skill some forget to take into account before they put themselves too far away from civilization proper.
The kids may have personalities that really need the dynamics of frequent interactions. Should you be concerned about their opportunities to socialize, you can compensate by having activities happening on your property and invite classmates when school isn't in session. I think parents sticking together and actively engaging activities could erase the barrier of distances. Consider joining groups like 4H or boyscouts/girlscouts.

Don't forget that the internet is really closing the gap between rural life, city life, and all points in between. Access to commerce, culture and educational material is unprecedented. Properly supervised they don't have to feel "left out of christmas" the way I've heard some teens complain about in rural or very small town life.
Of course part of teen angst is breaking away from parents, but resenting a small town doesn't have to be the reason they fly out of the nest. The negative attitudes seem to be about the fewer practical examples of what potential careers suit them, making it harder for them to see what future they can make for themselves. Boredom is the burden of kids who aren't challenged enough, and the solution to that is channel the energy where it needs to go; education.
Hope that perspective helps you out. Blessings to you and yours.
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Old 02-25-2008, 09:56 AM
 
5,654 posts, read 17,475,698 times
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I would not move into an unincorporated area unless I had plenty of acreage between you and your nearby neighbors.

If you move into an area that is zoned farm and there is not enough acreage between you and the neighbors, you may have issues as the zoning likely regards your properties as farms even though they don't look like a farm. This means you can have your neighbors pig pen right next to your patio door and you won't be able to do a d*mn thing about it. If you live in the country - make sure you live IN THE COUNTRY.

Don't just buy a house in town with a tiny lot cause it is cheap to live there (unless of course, you can't afford anything else). There is minimal to none code enforcement in unincorporated areas.
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