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Old 11-23-2016, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 13,705,105 times
Reputation: 7443

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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
..........." The Farm Bill is one of the biggest expenditures of the US govt "...

and the majority of Farm Bill spending is for,,,,,,,,,,,,,FOOD STAMPS

subsidies account for less than 3% of Farm Bill spending
I am not too certain if the Farm Bill is one of the "biggest expenditures of the US govt"

Quote:
But there's still a fair bit of spending left — $956.4 billion in all, or about 2 percent of all federal spending over the decade. So here's a breakdown of what we know about the farm legislation's various provisions:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...-in-one-chart/
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Old 11-23-2016, 12:06 PM
 
11,254 posts, read 44,568,979 times
Reputation: 15102
from my rural perspective ... and I've lived and owned businesses in a major population center for many years before moving to a sparsely populated rural area ...

this article is an accurate a portrayal of most of rural America as to visit areas of Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, Baltimore, New York City, Cincinnati, (or take your pick of the big urban centers on either coast) and assert that is what all the big cities are like.

I've been to all of these places in recent years on business trips/conferences ... and was "cautioned" to not be out from my hotel/motel without being in a group, especially "after dark" unless escorted. Typical examples were to be at a high end restaurant for dinner ... let's say, Peter Luger's in NYC ... where the restaurant staff wouldn't let us leave until our cab was at the front door and they could escort us from door to door for our safety. I've had the same experience repeated ... Miami manufacturer was especially concerned, made a big deal about group safety ... and the bars on the motel office and having to deal with the staff through the glass enclosure was somewhat off-putting. Had a similar experience at a high end restaurant in Cinc'y ... the restaurant staff wouldn't even allow us to walk across the parking lot to our group chartered bus, the driver had to bring the bus to the front door where staff escorted us to board the bus. Similarly repeated in other cities ... not just "after dark", but cautioned about even being on the street singly at any time, and warned "not to go" to various areas near our hotels or business meetings. Was even advised not to travel to a suburb of Portland OR for a lunch at an excellent ethnic restaurant due to criminal/gang activity prevalent in the area unless in a group ... there were bullet holes in the walls, ceiling, and glass of the place when we got there; told to never be there "after dark" (this was a popular restaurant with Textronix workers, I'm told ... but only during daylight hours).

Is this representative of all the folk and living situations in those "more tolerant" diverse urban populations? Probably not ... but it's as valid to assert it is as to draw the conclusions that the cited article author draws about rural living. He condemns all with a very broad brush which isn't applicable to most, and does it in an manner of superiority which just isn't true.
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Old 11-23-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 18,160,872 times
Reputation: 9046
The media likes to create unusual stereotypes, lately i hear about the "angry white Christian men" crap which is obviously made up by some big city media types they are the types that randomly like to label people by their race... hence "angy white Christian men" in rural America yes damn near everyone is white so the race obsession thing isn't so big here...

In reality everyone is unique in their own way and you can't judge a whole group of people.
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Old 11-23-2016, 02:18 PM
 
419 posts, read 273,734 times
Reputation: 1330
This writer really thinks he's something special. There are many college-educated rurals in America, but we don't use our education to belittle as he does. Some of the smartest people I've ever known never went to college, but that's something this fool would never see.

No, this article does not describe rural America. It is simply one mixed-up person's twisted perception that comes across as sour grapes. This article is very unfair and vitriol and appears to be for the purpose of further promoting division and hatred in America.
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Old 11-23-2016, 02:32 PM
 
3,075 posts, read 1,155,701 times
Reputation: 4428
Quote:
Originally Posted by StillRoaming View Post
This writer really thinks he's something special. There are many college-educated rurals in America, but we don't use our education to belittle as he does. Some of the smartest people I've ever known never went to college, but that's something this fool would never see.

No, this article does not describe rural America. It is simply one mixed-up person's twisted perception that comes across as sour grapes. This article is very unfair and vitriol and appears to be for the purpose of further promoting division and hatred in America.
I agree. I'm one of those rural Trump voters. I have Masters degree, a couple thousand books in my personal home library, and have had a very successful career. The urban elite that are trying to define Trump voters haven't a clue because they've never actually gone to rural America and talked with anyone.
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
13,120 posts, read 13,164,756 times
Reputation: 21280
I want to clarify that it is only the Southern Baptist Convention that holds to biblical inerrancy. They split from the Northern Baptists during the Civil War over slavery, they lost a lot of members during the purges of the '80s, and they still are shedding congregations over their radical views. Still, there are 15 million of them left, and they have control over many rural areas and small towns.
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
38,408 posts, read 47,281,770 times
Reputation: 64875
The people I lived near in the country were just regular, good people that raised children who knew how to work hard. They supported the schools and the teachers and they knew how to stretch a dollar. Fairly religious, but no more so than in the city.
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Divided Tribes of America
14,376 posts, read 5,894,091 times
Reputation: 5738
Much of rural America is like that, yes. Especially in the South and Midwest. Rural New England is far more civilized.
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Divided Tribes of America
14,376 posts, read 5,894,091 times
Reputation: 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
The stage for this was set when the Southern Baptist Convention was taking over by a cult of bibliolaters and purged everyone who did not believe the Bible was literal Truth (with a capital T). Through an extremist power play, a major church group converted itself to a cult that is hostile to all inquiry and critical thought.
The same thing happened in my former church body, the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod, back in the 1970's. They're every bit as crazy as the Southern Baptists.
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Old 11-23-2016, 03:40 PM
 
3,628 posts, read 5,162,055 times
Reputation: 3668
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_k_k View Post
The Bible Belt is not a literal belt and thus lacks a literal buckle. The word does not mean what you think it means.
Here's a full explanation of the expression "Bible Belt", including a listing of towns/ cities considered its "Buckle"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible_Belt
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