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Old 11-23-2016, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Divided Tribes of America
14,381 posts, read 5,898,891 times
Reputation: 5740

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Quote:
Originally Posted by StillRoaming View Post
This writer really thinks he's something special. There are many college-educated rurals in America, but we don't use our education to belittle as he does. Some of the smartest people I've ever known never went to college, but that's something this fool would never see.

No, this article does not describe rural America. It is simply one mixed-up person's twisted perception that comes across as sour grapes. This article is very unfair and vitriol and appears to be for the purpose of further promoting division and hatred in America.
It may be unfair that the author tried to paint all rural people as Christian fundamentalists. He/she is painting with too broad a brush.

But as someone who was raised in Christian fundamentalism, I can say that he/she understands the mentality of fundamentalism *perfectly*. It's a movement which is completely impervious to facts and reason, and thus it shares some disturbing similarities with radical Islam. It's a movement which is hazardous to both individuals and society.
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Old 11-23-2016, 04:20 PM
 
3,630 posts, read 5,164,954 times
Reputation: 3685
I agree with the article. Most of my older cousins in the rural South, and some of the younger ones, are just like the writer describes. Several of my cousins have master's degrees, but they still live in a "conservative bubble" listening only to people just like themselves. They continually share fabricated rumors and facebook quotations that have been disproven for years by multiple sources. My cousins won't take a minute to fact-check some of the most outrageous lies, and instead they are utterly outraged and livid, if I fact-check and call them on their lies. Some of them practically worship Franklin Graham (Billy Graham's son) who this year traveled around the U.S. campaigning for Trump, while claiming tax-exemption for his charitable organization.

They are also "defensive" about living in a rural, declining area, whose economy has become dependent on prisons, and whose crime rates per capita (proportionate to the smaller population) are actually on a par with big cities which they scorn and fear.
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Old 11-23-2016, 04:44 PM
 
Location: San Diego
37,345 posts, read 33,564,610 times
Reputation: 21675
A lot of that article is simply a load, almost click bait.


Everyone knows people like what's in that article but it's hardly "normal" and hardly "rural". Every single race, culture and region has people living in it the OP can bash on. Which, by the way, most of the article is doing.

Obama on gun control. He didn't extend because he couldn't. It wasn't like he didn't want to.

https://www.nraila.org/articles/2016...ctions-on-guns


Cities have gun laws, what's the big deal with liquor laws again? You are far more likely to die in a dui crash than shot no matter where you live.

That's just two he touched on. I'll take a redneck (his words) community over a gang infested, urban hell hole any day of the year. If I broke down in five points I'd never approach a house for help but in the conservative communities they'll be the first to help you.
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Old 11-23-2016, 04:50 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL
4,479 posts, read 3,741,128 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertbrianbush View Post
I agree it doesn't apply to everyone. But, where I lived, it applies a very significant portion of the population.
Same. I've seen and heard plenty of what's described in that article right here in rural Georgia. Some of my own family fits some of the description. And of course, no, not everyone is like that. But, it is a significant proportion and if it weren't for growing up in the Atlanta suburbs and my dad's side of the family being more educated, I could very well have ended up the same. And I know internet comments aren't necessarily a reliable or a statically sound sample but all you have to do is read comment on a lot of southern news pages and you'll find the sentiment.
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Old 11-23-2016, 04:54 PM
 
890 posts, read 522,293 times
Reputation: 2970
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_k_k View Post
The Bible Belt is not a literal belt and thus lacks a literal buckle. The word does not mean what you think it means.
I think literally everyone understands the colloquial use of "literally" does not literally mean "literally" but is merely to add emphasis.
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,330 posts, read 30,531,980 times
Reputation: 26957
I don't think it is hugely off-base. But I am going to share my own experiences from my family - I don't post here, so I'll share my own history as well.

My parents are both from rural parts of the south, growing up we visited annually, and I still have extended family in those parts. As a teen (roughly) we moved, as a family, to a less rural part near where my parents grew up - I graduated from high school there and we lived there for 6 years. Before that I grew up in suburban California (Silicon Valley). So I was born in one of the most liberal and progressive places, though it has changed a lot since my childhood and is quite different now. I currently live in the Bay Area, but not "Silicon Valley" but I work in tech.

I am also Black American. I grew up going to black churches and many of my family members are ministers. At this stage we are the black sheep who don't go to church, but my parents consider themselves religious. I spent my life going to church regularly up to about age 16 or so.

Both of my parents grew up in towns that had textile factories in or nearby (and my dad's town also had a paper mill not to far away). There were lots of farmers and most people grew most of their food. My mom's family even smoked their own meats for a while. Those "good jobs" weren't really open to black people when my parents were growing up. There weren't many jobs at all. My granddad on one side was a hustler, my grandma cleaned houses. My other granddad went to college, couldn't get a job in any of the local factories - even though he was a veteran and well educated - and he ended up becoming a preacher. My grandma dropped out of school at age 13 and her job was cafeteria cook. For reference, they were born between 1917-1925.

For both of my parents, their lives revolved around church. My dad was the preacher's son so he moved around a lot. My mom lived about 5 houses down from her church and the went there a few days a week for services, choir practice and bible study.

For my family the lives in our near those places now, this is still the case. They are at church 2x a week. When something goes wrong, it is "god's will." "God will solve your problems." "Pray and it'll work out."

This is stuff I have heard my whole life on all sides of the family for any situation. My aunt who never gave me gifts for any occasions gave me $20 to buy a bible when I graduated high school --- because every good christian woman needs her own bible!

This describes both of my parents towns, but my mom's the most. One of my cousins lived in and still lives in what you might call a shack, but that is probably too generous. They don't have indoor plumbing, now. I don't remember if they did when I was a kid. We never stayed for long, and certainly didn't eat any meals there. Other relatives lived in trailers on the family land. Various levels of niceness. My dad's community was more well kept, at least the homes. People were less poor and had more opportunity. Or maybe they had more hope.

Quote:
I have also watched the town I grew up in go from a robust economy with well-kept homes and infrastructure turn into a struggling economy with shuttered businesses, dilapidated homes, and a broken down infrastructure over the past 30 years.
Dad's town has a main street with not a whole lot. A few things are open, a lot of buildings are neglected. The only new development is a 90s era fast food place.

There people from my parents hometowns would agree with a lot of the stuff the republicans say, if they weren't so racist. My grandad identified as a republican. This doesn't mean he was anti civil rights. There were plenty of racist republicans not to vote for in their communities. But he was pro "personal responsibility." And anti-LGBT rights. And not super fond of integration. His whole life told him that white people couldn't be trusted. They treated him horribly. My dad had the same views and has only become more liberal in old age. My dad didn't inherit my grandad's more anti white views, because he had enough positive experiences with white people not to worry about it. My grandparents didn't have a white person in their home until about 1987 when my aunt brought her white friend from California.

Much of what the author talks about echoes my parents experiences, and my own experiences in the south I didn't even get into. I had racist classmates. And most of them had racist parents. There were people in my community who thought I was an uppity black person, and said that to me directly or indirectly. Things were segregated, even in my own class, and I am in my late 30s. Most people didn't have close friends outside of their ethnic group at my school. I was the weirdo who did. It was not common at all.

So based on my experience, while that editorial is slightly inflammatory, it isn't that far from the truth. And fundamental christians come in all shades. Most black churches teach similar rhetoric - minus the whites supremacy part. Even the more moderate ones.
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,330 posts, read 30,531,980 times
Reputation: 26957
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
[b]

They are also "defensive" about living in a rural, declining area, whose economy has become dependent on prisons, and whose crime rates per capita (proportionate to the smaller population) are actually on a par with big cities which they scorn and fear.

Exactly! The same sort of "gang" crime we hear about is how it works in the rural parts of america too. .... for black and whites. It is the same thing, but the rural people probably have a gun they got from a relative - and not the street dealer!
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Old 11-23-2016, 05:47 PM
 
1,606 posts, read 985,612 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
I agree with the article. Most of my older cousins in the rural South, and some of the younger ones, are just like the writer describes. Several of my cousins have master's degrees, but they still live in a "conservative bubble" listening only to people just like themselves. They continually share fabricated rumors and facebook quotations that have been disproven for years by multiple sources. My cousins won't take a minute to fact-check some of the most outrageous lies, and instead they are utterly outraged and livid, if I fact-check and call them on their lies.
Much the same as the type of people who read Alternet? Same coin.
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Old 11-23-2016, 06:23 PM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,707,805 times
Reputation: 7717
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
I agree with the article. Most of my older cousins in the rural South, and some of the younger ones, are just like the writer describes. Several of my cousins have master's degrees, but they still live in a "conservative bubble" listening only to people just like themselves. They continually share fabricated rumors and facebook quotations that have been disproven for years by multiple sources. My cousins won't take a minute to fact-check some of the most outrageous lies, and instead they are utterly outraged and livid, if I fact-check and call them on their lies. Some of them practically worship Franklin Graham (Billy Graham's son) who this year traveled around the U.S. campaigning for Trump, while claiming tax-exemption for his charitable organization.

They are also "defensive" about living in a rural, declining area, whose economy has become dependent on prisons, and whose crime rates per capita (proportionate to the smaller population) are actually on a par with big cities which they scorn and fear.
(last paragraph )

My research on crime indexes of areas doesn't back up your claim of crime rates in rural areas.

Even in the area of the old time Hatfields and McCoys it didn't compare to crime ridden cities like East St Louis.
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Old 11-23-2016, 06:40 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL
4,479 posts, read 3,741,128 times
Reputation: 3628
Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
(last paragraph )

My research on crime indexes of areas doesn't back up your claim of crime rates in rural areas.

Even in the area of the old time Hatfields and McCoys it didn't compare to crime ridden cities like East St Louis.
The problem is a lot of people think any city or urban area is dangerous. There are plenty of people that never want to cross Atlanta city limits (or go inside 285) when much of the city is just fine. There are certainly areas with terribly high crime rates but that's not representative of the whole city.
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