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Old 03-22-2008, 09:38 PM
 
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I'm just wanting to say, That Rural Towns in Australia are suffering the same kind of fate, As you are in America.

It was once said that Australia "Rode On The Sheep's Back", As we had a huge wool industry and rural sector!.....Unfortunately times have changed, There is an exodus of people, Jobs and Services from rural areas to the cities, Where about 70% of the Population now live.

Of course, Things like Extended droughts, Increasing salinity and Rising Production Costs haven't helped either, As many farmers have already walked off their land, Saying that it's just not viable to farm anymore, In one of the world's driest countries! and the towns have felt the effects!

Though The Mining Boom and the "Tree Change" fad has helped abit, To bring new people to country areas...It's not really enough? and That's a real shame, For a country that still prides itself, On the imagery of a rural lifestyle!
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Old 03-23-2008, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
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So what are the sheepherders and the farmers in Australia doing to try to keep your farms going? Don't know what the "Tree Change" fad is about, have never heard of that, perhaps you could explain.
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Old 03-23-2008, 04:31 PM
 
Location: North Cackelacky....in the hills.
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Funny you should post this message,I am originally from Australia but have spent half of my life here in the USA.

Lately have given some thought of buying a small property in a rural part of Australia and trying to live a more simple life.

Would be interested to read what it is really like in rural Australia.

My family lives in WA and my sister has a small piece of land an hour or so outside of Perth they hope to move to one day.

I have looked online at properties and found a few nice looking properties but know nothing of areas and potential problems such as water,lack of services or ability to grow/raise anything.

Where are you located in WA,isn't the wheatbelt east of Perth??
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Old 03-24-2008, 01:53 AM
 
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A Tree Change/Sea Change, Is when people decide to leave the cities, iIn search of a quieter and Simpler, Rural or Coastal life?

Well Australian farmers have had to switch to more environmentaly sound ways of planting crops and raising animals.....The old ways, Have been found to just not to work well With our poor soils and low rainfall.


OZ in SC: I'm about 250 kms (155 miles) north east of perth, In a wheat and sheep district called Trayning.....Yeah, I'm Cocky (Farmer)

I'm probably biased, But I say go for it!

Though, Where has your family brought?...As you might be able to get a property in or around about the same area?

I would just warn, About going too far away from Perth?, As it may become very hard to make a decent go of it?...If your looking to go seriously farming?


Here's interesting article on the state of Australias rural areas
The Impact Of Change On Rural Society - Regional Communities And The Family Farm
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Old 03-24-2008, 06:28 AM
 
Location: North Cackelacky....in the hills.
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My family has land around Toodyay.It sounds nice up that way although much drier than anything we have become used to here in the USA.

Thanks for the help.
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Old 03-24-2008, 07:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oz in SC View Post
My family has land around Toodyay.It sounds nice up that way although much drier than anything we have become used to here in the USA.

Thanks for the help.
Glad too help, When and If I can?

Toodyay is quite a nice place, From what I've seen of it? and It's fairly close to Perth!....Where I live, Is just abit too far away, The 2 and a Half hour drive can be a real pain sometimes?

Hehe, Yeah, It's pretty dry down under....Were not the "Driest Continent On Earth" for nothing, It may just take abit of getting used too again?
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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It is tough to make a living on a small farm in New england, USA and we get 40 to 60 inches of rain every year. Specialty farms like apple orchards seem to get by but aren't that profitable.
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Journey's End
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Interesting, GregW, that you say New England farmers don't do well, or at least the small farmer. I met with a couple of farmers this weekend here in Sullivan County (NY) and Wayne County (PA) for one of several writing assignments, and we talked about the differences in farming between this area and New England. Land here does not support agriculture the way it does in New England overall, and the decrease in farming is rapid. We see a few dairies but almost nothing green the way I experienced it in Western MA, VT and even ME.
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:40 AM
 
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Not to sound too rude or smug?, But we grow wheat crops in that kind of rainfall, Where I live the average is 300mm (75 inches)


Which sounds good, But it's very sporadic rain over a few winter months and then it completely stops (Apart from the odd thunderstorm), Due to this fairly unreliable rainfall, We can only manage one planting a year, Seeding from May to July (Winter) and Harvesting October to December (Summer)

Last edited by Kangaroofarmer; 03-24-2008 at 09:13 AM.. Reason: Trying To Improve My Maths
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Old 03-28-2008, 08:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kangaroofarmer View Post
Not to sound too rude or smug?, But we grow wheat crops in that kind of rainfall, Where I live the average is 300mm (75 inches)


Which sounds good, But it's very sporadic rain over a few winter months and then it completely stops (Apart from the odd thunderstorm), Due to this fairly unreliable rainfall, We can only manage one planting a year, Seeding from May to July (Winter) and Harvesting October to December (Summer)

Check my math, but I am thinking that 300 millimeters = a little under 12 inches. Generally considered near desert? West Texas has regions like that but they irrigate for wheat and other crops from a very large underground aquifer -- which is now being depleted.

Do you know your elevation above seal level? (meters or feet are fine. )
Just asking for whether solar distillation / pumping is a practical source of water.
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