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Old 04-11-2008, 08:51 PM
 
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The best casing is 5" PVC.
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Old 04-11-2008, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
11,488 posts, read 25,992,256 times
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Our experience-

Well cost: $20 per foot, with the first 100' a given. Jet pump and pressure tank roughly $500. Well pipe $100 + -, cost of trenching and running pipe from the well varies. Cost of running electricity to the well varies. Total cost guess? Figure $3000+ if you do most of the work yourself.

Septic? Best case scenario $3000 to $3500.

Electric cost: The power company has to go to the mains. Tapping off a secondary of an existing transformer ain't goinna happen. Overhead may be cheaper, but underground gives more flexibility and security. Costs vary tremendously based on distance from the power mains. For a simple trailer pole hookup and one intermediate pole, we paid about $500 to the utility company plus $400 for a trailer pole from a wholesaler, and had a friend help with erecting the pole.

For a distance of about 300+ feet to our main home from the mains, we paid the utility over $2000, $800 for the meter base, about $1,000 for conduit, wire to go from the meter base to the home, and misc connectors and anti-oxidant, etc. The 300' trench for the conduit cost me only about $600 by renting and using a backhoe and having day labor help me with the conduit and wire installation, but would cost most people at least $1,200. For an overall estimate, figure a minimum of $1,200 up front costs and $30 to $40 per each foot of distance over 70 feet from the mains power pole. This is all in an area where permits are not required. Permit fees are whatever the local leeches want to charge, so depending on the area, costs could double.

For power, many people going rural are figuring that at more than about 800 feet from a power line, it starts to make sense to go with super-energy-efficient appliances and alternative power, such as solar, wind, water, and wood.
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:07 PM
 
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All we do in Michigan is 5" PVC, with a submersible pump. Based on a 300ft rock well, (rather than a screened well), the well would be $4500. The complet hook-up, 1/2 horse pump, tank and hooked into the house $1800.

Wellowner.org - Informing consumers about ground water and water wells
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Old 04-12-2008, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,043 posts, read 7,352,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty3 View Post
Hi everyone-I'm looking to build in a rural area. The piece of land is 5 partially wooded acres, with a shared well. A septic system has to be put in. Also, electric needs to be 'dropped in' (is that the right phrase?). Can anyone give me a rough, ballpark figure on the cost to 'drop in' electricity? I called the electric company and they refused to even give me a range! There is a neighbor living on the adjoining land with electricity, so I assume they just tap into that line and do whatever they do to bring it to my property.
Can anyone give me a rough 'guestimate' or even a range for this type of thing?
I've seen electrical installations easily reach $10,000 for something that doesn't seem like it should cost that much. A lot of what drives up the price is adding poles, or having a long distance over which to pull wires. If your service is going to be underground, that can get expensive, too, due to the expense of digging the trench and laying conduit in it. Sometimes, the electric company will charge you for a portion of the expense of running the line to your neighbor's property, so they can reimburse your neighbor for the expenses they fronted to build the line. That way, you are paying a portion of that cost, even though the line has already been there for some time.

As for the well, yes it is possible to have a shared well. What you will need to look into very carefully is how the well expenses will be shared. Since the well will be shared, the expense of electricity to run it, as well as any maintenance, must be shared equally between all the owners/users of the well, or proportionately based on usage. Is there a water district or water company established to oversee the well (even if it only serves two or three customers)? Who will perform needed maintenance? How will you decide who does it? What about testing? Is it required by the state or local authorities? If so, who will do the testing? Do you all pay a monthly water bill with the proceeds going into a special account in which the money can only be drawn out by mutual agreement to pay the well expenses? Is there a separate electrical meter for the well? Are there water meters for each of the well users? If so, is there a way to pay the well expenses proportional to usage? Is there a water storage tank needed, and are the maintenance expenses included in the calculations? Is a tank required for each residence? Many fire departments require tanks for fire protection in rural areas. These are all things you will need to consider before making arrangements to share the well. Many people have these things worked out and do indeed share wells, but, for your protection, it needs to be well thought out (and written into an agreement) before you agree to do so.

I think the best plan for sharing of a well and any other necessary water distribution equipment, would be the formation of a local water company to oversee the whole system. All of the well users would be shareholders in the company, and all would share in the expenses (either divided equally, or proportional to usage), as well as all decisions to be made. A special account could be set up to protect the company's monetary assets, where money could only be spent by agreement from a majority of shareholders. Ideally, each shareholder would pay a little more into the account than is actually required to operate the system, automatically building in reserves to pay for system repairs. A company could be used to sample and test the system, and to ensure all compliance with state water quality standards.

Many, if not all, states require that water distribution systems be maintained by people with a special license (Water Distribution Operator Grade D-1 or higher in California). Water treatment (e.g. chlorination) requires a different license (Water Treatment Operator Grade T-1 or higher in California). Larger systems may require higher license grades.

The state's public health department should be able to give you more information about what is required for a shared well, as well as requirements for establishing and operating a water company.
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Old 04-12-2008, 09:32 AM
 
21,189 posts, read 16,456,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdavid93225 View Post
I've seen electrical installations easily reach $10,000 for something that doesn't seem like it should cost that much. A lot of what drives up the price is adding poles, or having a long distance over which to pull wires. If your service is going to be underground, that can get expensive, too, due to the expense of digging the trench and laying conduit in it.

As for the well, yes it is possible to have a shared well. What you will need to look into very carefully is how the well expenses will be shared. Since the well will be shared, the expense of electricity to run it, as well as any maintenance, must be shared equally between all the owners/users of the well, or proportionately based on usage. Is there a water district or water company established to oversee the well (even if it only serves two or three customers)? Who will perform needed maintenance? How will you decide who does it? What about testing? Is it required by the state or local authorities? If so, who will do the testing? Do you all pay a monthly water bill with the proceeds going into a special account in which the money can only be drawn out by mutual agreement to pay the well expenses? Is there a separate electrical meter for the well? Are there water meters for each of the well users? If so, is there a way to pay the well expenses proportional to usage? Is there a water storage tank needed, and are the maintenance expenses included in the calculations? Is a tank required for each residence? Many fire departments require tanks for fire protection in rural areas. These are all things you will need to consider before making arrangements to share the well. Many people have these things worked out and do indeed share wells, but, for your protection, it needs to be well thought out (and written into an agreement) before you agree to do so.

I think the best plan for sharing of a well and any other necessary water distribution equipment, would be the formation of a local water company to oversee the whole system. All of the well users would be shareholders in the company, and all would share in the expenses (either divided equally, or proportional to usage), as well as all decisions to be made. A special account could be set up to protect the company's monetary assets, where money could only be spent by agreement from a majority of shareholders. Ideally, each shareholder would pay a little more into the account than is actually required to operate the system, automatically building in reserves to pay for system repairs. A company could be used to sample and test the system, and to ensure all compliance with state water quality standards.

Many, if not all, states require that water distribution systems be maintained by people with a special license (Water Distribution Operator Grade D-1 or higher in California). Water treatment (e.g. chlorination) requires a different license (Water Treatment Operator Grade T-1 or higher in California). Larger systems may require higher license grades.

The state's public health department should be able to give you more information about what is required for a shared well, as well as requirements for establishing and operating a water company.
Those are municipal wells. Many areas have them, they are just like city water. Not the same as a shared well.
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Old 04-12-2008, 09:49 AM
 
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Just got a interesting call but not unusual. Two pieces of property, shared well. Mobile #2 was bought with the idea they would have water form mobile #1. Owner of mobile#1 passed on. No one paid the light bill, as they are going to sell it, grandchildren do not care what happens. Now they need a well, they lack the $6300. I hear this type thing a few times each year. I told them three years ago NOT to buy the property that way!
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Old 04-13-2008, 01:15 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW / CO / SA TX / Thailand
10,900 posts, read 17,967,210 times
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I find it beneficial to buy a trashed mobile home or beater house on acreage rather than develop bare property. Locally we have "impact fees" for converting bare land to residential that can be $20,000 +

then an approach permit and (short) driveway $2500 / culvert, or $10k+ long driveway
septic $10,000 > $30,000 (depends on type / design)
power $2000 > $20,000 (I have some friends who have chosen to go 'offgrid' due to current power cable costs) Costs vary depending on utility and area (rocks...)
You usually CANNOT run power from neighbors, you will have to run your own, unless you are up a public road that has developed power. You need to run "primary" power to within a few hundred feet of your residence / power panel, and then set a transformer / meter base, and secondary power to your building. Some utilities cover the primary wire costs, some even pay to trench and for conduit. Others require you to hire a subcontract power company to run Primary (our counties, we are on the line, are quite different in the way they charge for this, and one requires a separate company, the other requires you to use them...)
the 'plan review' costs are $12,000 in our current location (but this varies to ZERO, in a county where I built recently, commercial...not a home)

I have done shared wells on many properties over the last 30 yrs. There are some good and bad points. (most depends on how robust you set up the agreements and facilities, and how good your other parties are... if they are quacks, then get your own well)
I really like them for better utilization, frequent testing (required by state) and shared costs (repairs) and lower development costs. (well permits are VERY hard to get in some areas)
but you need

1) survey and recorded well / access / use and maint agreement
2) Good Idea to have a separate electric meter for this and prorated billing + a reserve for elect payments
3) Set up an escrow acct and periodic contributions for future Maint and repairs
4) have anti backflow devices to each site.
5) have any treatment necessary, done at each site
6) register it as a 'small community water source' In our state
a) class B for 2 - 5 services
b) Class A for more than 5 services (and a lot more restrictive about testing requirements)


You have lots of options tho and it depends on how much you can do yourself. I go take a test at the health department to install my own septics (Gravity systems cost me ~ $2000 in materials (tank and trenches, (or chambers) distribution boxes...)) Rent a backhoe and laser for a weekend for ~ $200 (unless you have your own, which is kinda handy too)

I have had my kids trench in the power for each of their rural lots, (~ 1000') as they had to each build their own home as a homeschool project. They had to take the septic installers tests too, it is good to know this stuff anyway, as you are likely to maintain your system better, and you know what's where and what it's there for. (Do document and leave some steel posts / pipe buried to locate stuff later, in case you forget, or move)

plenty to learn, but know your stuff to keep your bank acct.
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Old 04-13-2008, 08:07 AM
 
21,189 posts, read 16,456,661 times
Reputation: 8465
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty3 View Post
Hi everyone-I'm looking to build in a rural area. The piece of land is 5 partially wooded acres, with a shared well. A septic system has to be put in. Also, electric needs to be 'dropped in' (is that the right phrase?). Can anyone give me a rough, ballpark figure on the cost to 'drop in' electricity? I called the electric company and they refused to even give me a range! There is a neighbor living on the adjoining land with electricity, so I assume they just tap into that line and do whatever they do to bring it to my property.
Can anyone give me a rough 'guestimate' or even a range for this type of thing?
Could you please give us more information on the well? What size, type, will you have a water meter? Is this a "shared" or municipal well? Will you have a pressure tank in you home?
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Old 04-13-2008, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
11,488 posts, read 25,992,256 times
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"They had to take the septic installers tests too, it is good to know this stuff anyway, as you are likely to maintain your system better, and you know what's where and what it's there for. (Do document and leave some steel posts / pipe buried to locate stuff later, in case you forget, or move)"

There is an inexpensive burial marker wire made for the purpose. You use a metal detector to locate it. In a pinch, old barbed wire sections will do the same thing.
Usually there is enough rusted wire around that can't be reused for any other purpose.
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Old 04-14-2008, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Back Home In TN…YAY:):)
15,874 posts, read 15,716,906 times
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It really depends where you are. We just bought property in TN and for underground electric we need 20 feet cleared and for overhead poles we need 40ft cleared(utility easement). We get the first 500ft(wire only) of underground free and the rest we pay about $10.00 per foot for the remainder. If we go above ground with poles the electric co. again will give us the first 500ft. After that each pole will cost $900.00 and there is 350ft between poles.

I don't know if this helps b/c you really need to have someone from "your" electric co. come out to the property with you and explain it. Also see if you need any utility easements signed if you are crossing someone elses' land.

As far as your "shared" well. Get your own. It is never a good idea to share anything.
JMO.

Lisa
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