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Old 06-14-2008, 01:53 PM
 
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what population considers a city suburban? 50,000 population or 100,000 population? I know it matters more on population density, but what about the population itself? would rural be anything from 10-99,999 population if 100,000 population is suburban?

thanks for the help
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Old 06-14-2008, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
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Well, first, it has to be on the outskirts of a larger city but semi-separate from it. Beyond that, I really don't know that it has to be a particular size.
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Old 06-14-2008, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Maine
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I don't know that population is an issue. I've always understood "the suburbs" to be what people used to call "bedroom communities," meaning towns where people lived for the peace and quiet, but most of them still commuted into the larger nearby city for work every day.
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Old 06-14-2008, 05:18 PM
 
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Here's some info I have:

http://www.ciesin.org/pdf/IEEE_PozziSmall2001.pdf

List of United States cities by population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I don't know why, but I always hear when a city hits 100,000 population. It's a big deal.

Here are my 2 guesses:

Option 1)
refering to average city sizes
10-49,999 population (rural)
50,000-499,999 (suburban)
500,000-999,999 (urban)
1mil.-19,999,999 mill. (metropolis)

Option 2)
refering to in most cases, city's within those population ranges have population density considered to be "rural, suburban, urban, etc..."
10-99,999 (rural)
100,000-999,999 (suburban)
1,000,0000-9,999,999 (urban)
10,000,000+ (metropolis)

i also found this:

Metropolitan area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1-999 hamlet

100-9,999 town
10,000-499,999 city
500,000-9,999,999 metropolis
10,000,000 megapolis

Last edited by the city; 06-14-2008 at 05:26 PM..
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Old 06-14-2008, 05:23 PM
 
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i also gathered this, a suburb is any smaller community that is next to a large city.
it can be a college town, resort town, commuter town, edge city, or bedroom community.

2 suburb types:
-ex urb
-inner suburb
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Old 06-14-2008, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
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Having lived in a town of 10,000, it was definitely not "rural", but it wasn't "suburban", either. It was simply a small town with no city nearby to be a suburb to - it was self-supporting, in other words. (Still is, and not much larger, population-wise, and that was 45 years ago or so.)

I currently live just outside of a town of about 1,500-2,000. It is mainly a farming community (though it's turning into a suburb of the city some 40 miles to the south, with roads with easy access to the city hitting the interstate just a couple of miles away encouraging that). I'd say in another thousand people or so, it'll qualify as a suburb (bedroom community) of that larger city, just like the two towns to our south (considerably larger - one about 25,000, not really a suburb but a town in its own right for pretty near as long as the city has been, the other swallowed up by now and definitely a suburb of the city), but smaller. It has more to do, I think, with the percentage of the people in the community who commute to the city to work or not, than number of people.
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Old 06-14-2008, 07:05 PM
 
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how big is the largest city? 100,000 or around 500,000?
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Old 06-15-2008, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
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Are you asking me how big is the nearby city? About 650,000.
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Old 06-15-2008, 12:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Are you asking me how big is the nearby city? About 650,000.
yes, that was the question. i see, so your suburb is any bedroom community or commuter town next to a metropolis.

1-999 hamlet
1000-9,999 town
10,000-499,999 city
500,000-9,999,999 metropolis
10mill and up megapolis

I wonder how it matters by density for california?

I am trying to see if San Luis Obispo and South County is suburban or not. There is 150,000 population of San Luis Obispo. And SLO has 45,000 population itself. It's 30 minutes away from a city of 91,000 population.


here's the classification for Ohio.
Exurban Change Program
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Old 06-15-2008, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Having lived in a town of 10,000, it was definitely not "rural", but it wasn't "suburban", either. It was simply a small town with no city nearby to be a suburb to - it was self-supporting, in other words. (Still is, and not much larger, population-wise, and that was 45 years ago or so.)

I currently live just outside of a town of about 1,500-2,000. It is mainly a farming community (though it's turning into a suburb of the city some 40 miles to the south, with roads with easy access to the city hitting the interstate just a couple of miles away encouraging that). I'd say in another thousand people or so, it'll qualify as a suburb (bedroom community) of that larger city, just like the two towns to our south (considerably larger - one about 25,000, not really a suburb but a town in its own right for pretty near as long as the city has been, the other swallowed up by now and definitely a suburb of the city), but smaller. It has more to do, I think, with the percentage of the people in the community who commute to the city to work or not, than number of people.
I find it hard to believe with gas prices so high that anyone would want to live as far as 40 miles from work.
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