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Old 07-08-2008, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,503 posts, read 5,643,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvermouse View Post
Ha! They have to cover all of it to get enough to eat. He does move them around though.

I think I'm the one that told you 3 acres/animal unit. I think a bull = 3 animal units and a cow/calf pair = 2 units and a steer = 1 unit. Don't quote me on that. The extension can tell you for sure.
Hi Silvermouse,

I also think the cattle ranchers/realtors we used said 3 acres/cow, but the animal unit designation is more specific, so thanks. I may not need to worry about farming in MO if my darn house in NY doesn't sell soon.

Tambre
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:02 AM
 
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"other areas have a carrying capacity of 20 cattle per acre"

PURE BS

I have rotationally grazed for 18 years and I will state there is---NOWHERE---that you can graze 20 cattle per acre.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,479 posts, read 52,339,241 times
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Please remember that you do not own the cattle; they own you. Also remember that our agribusiness system is not set up to help the small farmer. The system is designed to help (subsidize) the big operations. In any case talk with a good accountant familiar with farm and small business taxes before you invest any money.
Tambre – why not farm in the Catskills? There is lots of land and more reliable rain than the Midwest? I am just curious as I used to live in the boonies west of Albany.
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Old 07-08-2008, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW View Post
Please remember that you do not own the cattle; they own you. Also remember that our agribusiness system is not set up to help the small farmer. The system is designed to help (subsidize) the big operations. In any case talk with a good accountant familiar with farm and small business taxes before you invest any money.
Tambre – why not farm in the Catskills? There is lots of land and more reliable rain than the Midwest? I am just curious as I used to live in the boonies west of Albany.
Hi Greg,

We looked upstate for land, but the taxes were prohibitive for us. Also we wanted to get away from the endless winters here. I like the cold and snow, but not from November to April. NY is also governmentally overbearing. You can't pass gas without getting a special permit. What was the reason you moved away from the area? Tambre
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Old 07-08-2008, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
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Wink You can't cook things in your fragipan

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Odd. I had a work acquaintance who bought a home in Missouri and later had SEVERE cracking of the slab and settling. Wonder if it was built on the same stuff. He said that during the wet season, the ground just turned to mud, and if it got wet under the house, he was hosed. With soil like that, I'd consider driven piers, reinforced footers, and then primitive piers on top that could be adjusted periodically to compensate for settlement. We don't have to worry about that here, our footers rest on a chert ledge.

The difference in what can be researched online now vs the hoops you had to go through thirty years ago to get similar information is amazing. That website is one of the better aspects of today's technology.
Hi Harry and everyone,

I am so relieved...talked to a soil scientist today, from Springfield, and he said that Needleye silt loam is fine to build on, but would need footing drains and gravel around the foundation to remediate the frost heaving/water draining issues and waterproofing the foundation for a dry basement. He talked me through the use of [The Cooperative Soil Survey] Home. I now know what a fragipan is. LOL.

Last edited by tambre; 07-08-2008 at 01:40 PM.. Reason: grammar
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Old 07-08-2008, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,758 posts, read 55,889,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tambre View Post
Hi Harry and everyone,

I am so relieved...talked to a soil scientist today, from Springfield, and he said that Needleye silt loam is fine to build on, but would need footing drains and gravel around the foundation to remediate the frost heaving/water draining issues and waterproofing the foundation for a dry basement. He talked me through the use of [The Cooperative Soil Survey] Home. I now know what a fragipan is. LOL.
Good good! Glad to learn that you have soil that can be made to work! Is that anything like frangapani (grin, duck, and run)
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Old 07-08-2008, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Good good! Glad to learn that you have soil that can be made to work! Is that anything like frangapani (grin, duck, and run)
Oh Brother
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Old 07-09-2008, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,479 posts, read 52,339,241 times
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I move away from Albany because I met a girl that lived in Connecticut. I had just returned from 'Nam and the only game in town was the construction of State mall in downtown. Eventually the girl (wife for 40+ years) and I wound up in New Hampshire and we are considering moving to New Mexico when I retire.

I may try to buy some irrigated land and grow some veggies after we move.
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Old 07-09-2008, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,503 posts, read 5,643,496 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW View Post
I move away from Albany because I met a girl that lived in Connecticut. I had just returned from 'Nam and the only game in town was the construction of State mall in downtown. Eventually the girl (wife for 40+ years) and I wound up in New Hampshire and we are considering moving to New Mexico when I retire.

I may try to buy some irrigated land and grow some veggies after we move.
Hey Greg,

Ok, so how do you know so much about cows? Why do you want to move to NM after living in NH for so many years? Also, I'm old enough to remember the Vietnam war. Sorry you had to get involved in that, unless it was your choice. Guess some areas of New Mexico are less arid than others. What veggies are you planning on growing?
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Old 07-09-2008, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 9,111,745 times
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Quote:
He has now had problems with sucking his well dry. Trucking in feed, and the economy. As well as the general lower level of grass production and seasonal drought-like conditions.
The farm I lived on had a couple of windmills. The shallowest one was only 50 ft deep and didn't seem to be going down. Of course, we didn't pump during the winter, since we put the cattle back in the "shinery," we called it -- just short oak that cattle could eat when there was no grass. The stuff was poisonous during the spring, but we had something else for them to eat by then.

We also had a man-made pond which I'd recommend. It would keep rainwater for quite a while, unless we had a dry spell. But, if we had put a windmill there, it would've kept water. All of the windmills had tanks, though I imagine they could be rigged for overflow.

We only had to move once, though, which was around 1954. That was a serious drought. I was just a tot, then, and the family had to move to a city where my dad kept us fed and sheltered from selling cars. I don't know what he did with the cattle. He might've sold them to a nearby ranch. I never thought to ask.

BTW, there are a lot of farms that raise peaches, watermelons, pecans, and all kinds of vegetables to supplement their incomes. You usually see them on the side of the highway. They seem to be common in some areas but not in others.
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