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Old 09-13-2008, 09:35 AM
 
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Here is my snow fence question. We have been able to pretty much keep up with snow blowing activities with our tractor on a fairly good length north south driveway (gravel). There is almost no protection from the north with the property there being a hayfield.

But the driveway is prone to drifting and if you do not keep up with it, it's a mess. How far to the west is the best distance to put up a snow fence from the west end of the driveway. I hear a lot of discussion on the science of distance versus the "sweet spot" to keep the driveway as reasonable as possible.

Any thoughts are appreciated.
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Old 09-13-2008, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
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It's been a long time since I've had to put up any snow fence but as a kid I remember my grandfather and I used to put a snow fence up that ran parallel with the driveway and on the upwind side, generally it was anywhere between 12 to 15 feet from the driveway but then again we didn't get a whole lot of snow, now I don't know where you're located at but I suspect depends on how much snow you get as to how far the distance should be between the snow fence and your driveway, just something to start with.
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Old 09-13-2008, 06:47 PM
 
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I would go back 25 or 30 foot. I am going back to childhood too.
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Old 09-14-2008, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Western Hoosierland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpperPeninsulaRon View Post
Here is my snow fence question. We have been able to pretty much keep up with snow blowing activities with our tractor on a fairly good length north south driveway (gravel). There is almost no protection from the north with the property there being a hayfield.

But the driveway is prone to drifting and if you do not keep up with it, it's a mess. How far to the west is the best distance to put up a snow fence from the west end of the driveway. I hear a lot of discussion on the science of distance versus the "sweet spot" to keep the driveway as reasonable as possible.

Any thoughts are appreciated.

this is news to me i have never heard of a snow fence.
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Old 09-14-2008, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Used to have them all over when I was growing up. They sorta work, especially when snow conditions are right, but not so much when the temps drop to below 10 degrees and the wind is whipping up enough snow to overtop them or pick up the snow within a few feet past the fence. I remember a few places that had two layers of fence about ten to fifteen feet apart that worked a bit better until the snow got really deep.
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Old 09-14-2008, 07:32 PM
 
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Another thing that helps, if it is a field or grass next to your driveway, drop the snow bucket about half way down and plow a "road" about 50 ft away from your driveway running the same direction.

It will catch lots of snow, but you might need tractor chains to do it

In Minnesota, they pay farmers with cornfields to leave a few rows of unharvested corn next to state highways ( you are allowed to harvest the corn in spring --if possible)

They call them "living snowfences" and the drifts in the corn rows get quite deep.
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Old 12-10-2009, 05:02 PM
 
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See http://www.us-fence.com/HTML/snow-instructions.html (broken link)
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Old 12-10-2009, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Lead/Deadwood, SD
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There are many variables including frequent wind speeds, neighboring terrain, and average/maximum expected snow. The ones along the Wyoming Highways I have seen are a good 100 ft. + back from the roads. Main thing is to get them far enough back so the drift doesn't overrun onto the drive - sometimes multiple rows are necessary if the oncoming expanse of openness is far reaching, also some areas of terrain can be used to your advantage while some locations will show little benefit.
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Old 12-11-2009, 03:56 AM
 
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It's really a local issue, site specific to the conditions around your driveway.

Much depends upon the prevailing wind directions for the storms that come through your way, nearby structures, and how much total snowfall drops in any given storm front.

All you can do is to try placing the snow fence in the vicinity of the driveway and see what results. I'd try about 100' away, parallel to the driveway on the prevailing upwind side of the site.

Keep an eye on the drift and if it's helping your driveway, you've got the benefit. If it's not creating a drift where you need it, then you will have to move the fence or set a second fence as required.
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Old 12-11-2009, 01:36 PM
 
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As stated it's really a localized issue...

...but don't build a whole fence to find out! Do what my dad did when we first put ours in when I was a kid...nail a few 2x4s into a frame and stick 'em in the snow and see what kind of drift result you get and adjust accordingly. So then you either are building snow fence in the snow, or wait until next spring/summer...which doesn't sound intolerable as it sounds like you've been able to deal with it.
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