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Old 02-02-2009, 06:48 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
8,259 posts, read 12,631,659 times
Reputation: 5121

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoNative34 View Post
I'm looking forward to selling my land when it happens. I'll be set for life.
Unfortunately that won't happen. Here in Maryland I grew up near a large farm and everytime we drove past my dad would be envious of the farmer and say how he's lucky to be able to own so much land and how much he can sell it for one day.

Now that land is a massive subdivision where 10,000 live, a mixed use area of shops, single family homes, townhouses and condos. The farmer made nothing for land. As the land around his property became mix-used, rezoned, or built up, the county government increased the property taxes more and more. The governmetn foreclosed on his farm and sold the land to developers. There are similar stories where the landowners are forced to sell for very cheap while the developers make a killing on the profits. The liberal elites who run this country care nothing about small town America.
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Old 02-02-2009, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,735,734 times
Reputation: 3364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
The government foreclosed on his farm and sold the land to developers. There are similar stories where the landowners are forced to sell for very cheap while the developers make a killing on the profits. The liberal elites who run this country care nothing about small town America.
I don't think this problem has anything to do with either Liberal or Conservative, Democratic or Republican... it's 100% down to Capitalism. I think all government factions are equally suscpetible to screwing the little guy for the sake of the bigger guy's profit or the "greater good".
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Old 02-02-2009, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Rolla, Phelps County, Ozarks, Missouri
1,069 posts, read 2,255,392 times
Reputation: 1259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Now that land is a massive subdivision where 10,000 live, a mixed use area of shops, single family homes, townhouses and condos.
This is what newcomers to rural Missouri say they miss about their "home." It's why I say they should stay in the cities where they are.
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:20 PM
 
Location: IN
21,104 posts, read 36,600,807 times
Reputation: 13661
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoNative34 View Post
I'm looking forward to selling my land when it happens. I'll be set for life.
Only if that nasty KC metro sprawl gets way out of control.
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Old 02-03-2009, 09:33 AM
 
418 posts, read 1,063,972 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarksboy View Post


Probably the best thing is for Rolla to grow and sprawl with an influx of out-of-staters, and I can just ignore them, make fun of them and ridicule them when they deserve.
Rolla doesn't need out-of-staters. We have plenty of people that just need decent jobs. That 'Rolla West ' plan is just bringing in more minimum wage jobs for spoiled mall-rat types. We need some decent blue collar jobs to diversify our economy. The Powers That Be don't want that kind of icky growth though.
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Old 02-09-2009, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,675,816 times
Reputation: 1274
Where I live in the exurbs southwest of Chicago, quite a few rural towns were taken over by spreading growth. They are now part of the greater Chicago metropolitan area. What I remember of some of these towns from 30 years ago is now gone. It is truly sad to see some of these places where I grew up turn into a mess that they are now.
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Old 02-09-2009, 09:11 AM
 
25,691 posts, read 24,526,757 times
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Yep I can totally relate to that sad issue. I grew up (for the most part) in Sunnymead, Calif which is now like L.A. Casa Grande Az grew from a small town where everyone knew everyone to now its a lock-your-doors' kind of city. Victorville Calif used to be nothing but open fields and a few houses. Now its one of the fastest growing cities. I've lived in all those areas but my reasons for moving were either job related or because I wanted to come home.
Hey I found an article though that particularly perked up my ears and eyes, and thought Id share with y'all.

Best Rural Places to Live - WalletPop

You kinda have to scroll down to read it. Notice that neither Az or Calif are among this list.
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Old 02-09-2009, 03:31 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,481 posts, read 41,079,279 times
Reputation: 25063
Urban sprawl and increased property valuations has chased our family off 3 farms (that is a lot of work down the tubes). I thought I was smart to move to a development restrictive national scenic area to avoid future sprawl. That worked for a few yrs, but our property taxes have gone from $800 / yr to $12,000 / yr (That is over $30 / day...).

so... now that I'm an early retiree, and have no income for next 40 yrs... This silly speculation of property values is not a good thing for the long term plan... if you pay property taxes based on value While the assessor encourages us to sell and leave yet another farm... we laid every brick and cleared the land and are too tired to do this again. Besides I can't afford the taxes on the bare land, much less putting a house on it. We have a bare piece of property next door that is taxed at $4,000 / yr for just sitting there.

Maybe we will have to move out of USA or live under a bridge, but I will contend that the thought of increased values is good is not my experience. (I don't consider my HOME an investment.... it is just a place to live, until the tax man takes it away)

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 02-09-2009 at 03:46 PM..
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Old 02-09-2009, 08:06 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,454 posts, read 43,301,321 times
Reputation: 44120
Not so much the town has been hit with sprawl but the County. It went from @ 26,000 population in 1985 to almost 90,000 today and used to be considered too far away from DC to commute from. The town has gone from being 2/3 summer residents to 99% full time residents. Houses were winterized, or demo'd and rebuilt. Our house is one of the oldest at about 95 years ans one of the few that was always year round occupied, third owners (first two were a father and then his daughter).
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Old 02-11-2009, 02:45 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
5,109 posts, read 7,829,086 times
Reputation: 9625
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
I don't think this problem has anything to do with either Liberal or Conservative, Democratic or Republican... it's 100% down to Capitalism. I think all government factions are equally suscpetible to screwing the little guy for the sake of the bigger guy's profit or the "greater good".
Absolutely. It is actually far more likely that it is a conservative, capitalist loving, regulation blasting republican developer(s) that are ramming these huge exurban developments into the countryside.
More liberal cities, ie. Portland OR. are far more likely to have stringent regulations (the green line) limiting spawl or at least encouraging infill development within an area already served well by public infrastructure.
There are plenty of liberals (probably most) who hate urban sprawl, and who love the country and small towns.

My hometown of Sonora, CA was once a truly beautiful and charming gold rush town in the foothills of the Sierra and has been fairly ruined by the sprawl up the Highway and on the hills; Wallmart and the rest have sucked all the fiscal life out of the town and developers have overwhelmed the rolling hills and chopped down as many oak trees as they can. The county is one of the most conservative in California.
Go down to Liberal Marin County and see how effectively strong regulations keep the beautiful hillsides at least moderately undeveloped.

So it is not so black and white as the knee jerk reactions that some folks espouse.
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