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Old 02-02-2009, 07:52 PM
 
363 posts, read 779,374 times
Reputation: 628

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*sigh*

Is there any worse feeling than seeing that farmer's pasture you've known since childhood being turned into a McMansion farm?

And they sprout up so quick! Like fungus after a spring rain.

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Old 02-02-2009, 08:45 PM
 
Location: CasaMo
15,593 posts, read 7,665,383 times
Reputation: 17164
Instead of a nice neighborhood it couldv'e been developed as:

1. A trailer park
2. An industrial site
3. A power plant
4. A prison
5. A landfill

Chances are that property's value is way too high to remain vacant.
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:14 PM
 
Location: IN
21,113 posts, read 36,608,726 times
Reputation: 13665
McMansions= not a wise use of natural resources.
I have a feeling consumers will start to demand smaller houses that are more efficient.
I would much rather have a custom built 1500sq ft house instead of a cheaply built 3000sq ft cookie cutter McMansion.
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:15 PM
 
Location: The Woods
17,096 posts, read 22,613,580 times
Reputation: 9375
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoNative34 View Post
Instead of a nice neighborhood it couldv'e been developed as:

1. A trailer park
2. An industrial site
3. A power plant
4. A prison
5. A landfill

Chances are that property's value is way too high to remain vacant.
Or it could remain farmland and keep Americans fed with American grown food. But hey, what's wrong with being a net importer of food?

On the bright side, more and more of those mcmansions are sitting vacant and less will be built as consumerism collapses.
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,490 posts, read 38,410,774 times
Reputation: 23086
Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Or it could remain farmland and keep Americans fed with American grown food.
And that use of it means that it is NOT vacant! Just because there's no buildings on a piece of land doesn't mean that it's not being used well.
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:56 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 85,116,437 times
Reputation: 18083
What I see is is a previous owner that is well off having sold the loand. fewer people are able to keepup with the rising tax bill once as civilaiztion comes near also.
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Old 02-02-2009, 11:21 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,686,634 times
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most people who post here are vehemently opposed to zoning ( I am opposed also)

However , zoning could have prevented that.
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Old 02-03-2009, 01:29 AM
 
Location: In The Outland
6,023 posts, read 12,076,045 times
Reputation: 3535
Another preventive measure would be to sneak out at night and move all the survey stakes before construction starts,
over and over and over again while wearing a mask, tights and a cape !
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Old 02-03-2009, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Niceville, FL
7,942 posts, read 16,469,741 times
Reputation: 8260
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
most people who post here are vehemently opposed to zoning ( I am opposed also)

However , zoning could have prevented that.
Zoning can also help on the tax issue- a property zoned agricultural frequently has lower tax rates than residential or commercial land, and in some states you can get an even bigger tax break if you agree to sign off on a long time conservation easement (which lets you keep farming or ranching the land but limits your ability to split the parcel into McMansionettes)

The thing that drives me nuts about urban sprawl is that there's no real thought given to eventually creating a community as a whole- just endless lines of new subdivisions. No setting aside land for the kind of small commercial center so people can get gas, limited grocery service, a sit down meal, a place to pick up big packages, etc., some sort of small church or preschool. Kind of like a proto-small town.

Instead, everyone drives five or ten miles to the nearest Walmart of get a gallon of milk when it would be nice to be able to walk a couple of blocks to be able to do the smae.
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Old 02-03-2009, 09:18 AM
 
40,555 posts, read 24,895,764 times
Reputation: 12902
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
Zoning can also help on the tax issue- a property zoned agricultural frequently has lower tax rates than residential or commercial land, and in some states you can get an even bigger tax break if you agree to sign off on a long time conservation easement (which lets you keep farming or ranching the land but limits your ability to split the parcel into McMansionettes)

The thing that drives me nuts about urban sprawl is that there's no real thought given to eventually creating a community as a whole- just endless lines of new subdivisions. No setting aside land for the kind of small commercial center so people can get gas, limited grocery service, a sit down meal, a place to pick up big packages, etc., some sort of small church or preschool. Kind of like a proto-small town.

Instead, everyone drives five or ten miles to the nearest Walmart of get a gallon of milk when it would be nice to be able to walk a couple of blocks to be able to do the smae.
I agree. Many developers are putting in small playgrounds and community swimming pools in the McMansion neighborhoods. Putting in a general store/snack place wouldn't be a stretch. A place people could pick up stamps, milk, bread, or grab a lemonade and a grilled cheese sandwich. I think setting up a dry-clean drop-off, where a store employee could take the dry-cleaning to a dry-cleaners in town and pick-up the dry-cleaning for the neighborhood would be a wonderful convenience.
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