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Old 02-05-2009, 08:13 PM
 
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That's what the land looks like. Me thinks I'm gonna need some uber equipment...
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Costs of telephone pole takedowns and wire burial?-middle.jpg  
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Old 02-06-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,531 posts, read 55,444,914 times
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Around here, $75/hr can get a guy with a bulldozer. However, there is a different bit of equipment that will grind those trees into a mulch and level the land at the same time. MUCH faster and less expensive overall. I forget what it is called, but a builder or realtor in your area should be able to guide you to a company with one. Although... if that is an orchard, there could be a market for the wood for bbq or specialty projects.
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Old 02-09-2009, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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You might think about selling the trees "on the hoof" depending on what they are. Could help pay for your project.

I have seen TV ads for the grinding service harry chickpea describes. I don't know what it's called either, but people who deal in tree cutting and/or arborists around you probably know what this is called, who does it around you.

Good luck with a cool project.
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Old 02-16-2009, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Democratic Peoples Republic of Redneckistan
11,102 posts, read 13,352,111 times
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That looks like power to me ol'buddy and that will get in your pocket DEEP if you want it transfered from aerial to buried...If it's a dead line 15 minutes with a backhoe and you would never know it was ever there.I have buried both(MANY,MANY miles of it) and in most instances the power company or one of their contractors are the only people even REMOTELY allowed near power and that is NOT a greenhorns game.....phone is a different story depending on where you are and ground conditions.Phone(service drop) can be buried with a rented Case Maxi sneaker...it is plowed in and you can do 15,000 feet per day in good ground conditions with no problem at all and still have time to goof off talking to your buddies on the cell phone.Trenching is a pain in the butt due to restoration and you DO NOT want to trench in an area where livestock will be kept due to the fact that if it washes out (which it will) in a spot then you run the risk of broken legs.Plowing eliminates that risk and you'll never even know it was done if the ground is right.Also depending on the area and company,you can contact the phone company and they will do it for you at no charge sometimes and depending on the circumstances.
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Old 02-16-2009, 01:46 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Muleskinner just reminded me of something which I don't know will pertain to you. In MD when you transition from aboveground to underground to an older existing house, the house has to pass the current electrical code.
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Old 02-16-2009, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Democratic Peoples Republic of Redneckistan
11,102 posts, read 13,352,111 times
Reputation: 3926
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Muleskinner just reminded me of something which I don't know will pertain to you. In MD when you transition from aboveground to underground to an older existing house, the house has to pass the current electrical code.
That can be rough too.I have worked in states where that was the case and getting a 30 yo house up to NEC can be a big money deal depending on your area,the contractors available and if a license is required by your state.

Those old 30 amp boxes won't cut it nowdays
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