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Old 12-26-2009, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by my54ford View Post
Old typ leach fields?!?!? how non-eco friendly!!!!!Got to have a Mound system with alarms here in the Great White North. Easy 10k

Mound septic systems | Meade Septic Design Inc.
A leechfield is a leechfield.

Whether it is a stone bed or a mound; there is very little difference. In both cases your effluent is still being perced into the soil.
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Old 12-26-2009, 11:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
A leechfield is a leechfield.

Whether it is a stone bed or a mound; there is very little difference. In both cases your effluent is still being perced into the soil.
Not true !

I am "grandfathered in" with my old septic,drain field system but can never obtain a building permit on my farm or sell my farm until the sewer system is updated ( Minnesota)

The new mound system is an evaporate system as the many lines going out are buried quite shallow .

The depth of the many lines is what is different than a an old style leach system ( Minnesota)

I doubt any of us can answer this OP's question unless we know what the requirements are for his area, permits and inspections needed, and the prevailing labor rate.


Giving one's opinions when one lives in an area that has different requirements ( or very soft requirements ) is meaningless to a person who lives in an area that has strict requirements.
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Old 12-27-2009, 01:28 PM
 
Location: In a happy place
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And those different requirements come about because of different soil types.
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Old 12-27-2009, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Of course they are each different from each other, but they each are systems for leeching out effluent into the soil.

Their effect on the eco-system is roughly the same.
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Old 12-28-2009, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Of course they are each different from each other, but they each are systems for leeching out effluent into the soil.

Their effect on the eco-system is roughly the same.
No trying to be argumentative but the mound system does not put liquid into the ground or potentially the ground water. The mound is built on top of a clay or otherwise impermeable base typicaly ight on grad, and as Marmac said the liquid is forced to evaporate thru vent lines in the mound. Alarm systems monitor the depth of solids in the final chamber. Just bought a farm with a brand new one..... (Yes that farm MM!)
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Old 12-28-2009, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Then I am confused. I have had leechfields before. But I never built one before.

Here on this property, the soil guy took samples of the soil and because of the soil type here said that we had to use this one type of system. He gave me a four page set of plans for exactly how to build this stone-bed mound.

At grade I scarified an area 40' by 20'. Laid down a foot of field stone, then an array of perforated pipe, and more field stone to hold the pipe in place, then 3 foot of sand. So we built a 4 foot high mound that is 40' by 20'. Completely above grade.

The transfer pipe coming from the house is underground, below the frost line and comes up in the middle of that mound and connects to the pipes in it.

I really do not get the difference, how is this not a mound?
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Old 12-29-2009, 09:08 AM
 
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It would be an illegal system where I live.

Your system ( field stone,sand) is designed for the liquids to soak into the ground with nothing in place to slow down the downward seepage.

In fact ,using stone and sand aids faster seepage down into the ground.

I mowed the lawn at my daughter's house with a push mower and the ground on top of the mound is way softer than the ground elsewhere due to liquids being near the surface and being evaporated.

Septic systems like forrest beekeeper explained, have been outdated and illegal for over 20 years in many parts of Minnesota.

Illegal in my area, and I live in rural MN.
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Old 12-29-2009, 10:36 AM
 
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Here in North Florida we live in high water table area hence mound system consisting of sand set to EPA standards.There are 4 runs all connected in rectangle fashion placed with transit,covered with visquene and then sand,mound 3 feet high 20 wide 40 long.Water table anywhere from 6 inches to 30 inches below mound.Our well is 80 feet away.
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,487 posts, read 38,404,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
It would be an illegal system where I live.

Your system ( field stone,sand) is designed for the liquids to soak into the ground with nothing in place to slow down the downward seepage.

In fact ,using stone and sand aids faster seepage down into the ground.

I mowed the lawn at my daughter's house with a push mower and the ground on top of the mound is way softer than the ground elsewhere due to liquids being near the surface and being evaporated.

Septic systems like forrest beekeeper explained, have been outdated and illegal for over 20 years in many parts of Minnesota.

Illegal in my area, and I live in rural MN.
And, yet, where forestbeekeeper lives, in an entirely different state with entirely different soil, it is not only legal, but required for the type of soil and situation he has. A different situation with a different legal solution. Go figure!
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Old 12-29-2009, 01:43 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,683,788 times
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What I was debating was Forest Breath's assertion that there was no difference between how his his mound system is designed ( that is illegal) where I live , and the system required here.

Try to keep up with the discussion rather than throwing barbs
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