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Old 02-22-2009, 10:59 AM
 
Location: NE Nebraska
84 posts, read 363,209 times
Reputation: 99

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The answer is to keep farming areas separate from residential areas. People tend not to realize that in an agricultural intense area there is business going on 24 hours a day. I see it all the time. People move to the country then complain about the noise of grain bin dryers, the smell of livestock, the lights coming from fields at night during planting, haying and harvest times. The noise from pivot irrigation motors, the way the grain trucks tear up the roads are other things people complain about.

Then you have conflict between farmers. You have a guy trying to farm like his grandfather did next store to a guy running a medium (under 2,500 head) hog finishing operation complaining about the factory farm next store and the odor generated. Then you have a guy with livestock dumping manure on his fields on Thanksgiving morning. These fields just happen to be across the street from a guy's house and the odor flows through the house during the Lion's loss and the turkey dinner.
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Old 02-23-2009, 06:16 PM
 
Location: this side of knoxville tn...
253 posts, read 718,631 times
Reputation: 273
Default so true!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
1. An analogy in the city: Our downtown area is trying to revitalize (waste of time and money) so some developers bought an old warehouse and remodeled it into some very nice condos. Al these "forward thinking" (love that terminology BTW) people moved in.

Then they figured out there were railroad tracks 50 feet from the building and the trains had to sound their horn at each cross street. LMAO!!! Morons started complaining to the city, state, anybody that would listen.

What did they think those funny steel things they had to drive over to get home were. I wonder? Lord people are stupid sometimes. 50 condos sold and moved into and not a one realized that trains made noise.

2. The flip side of farm smell: We have a lot of pig lots here. The problem they've run into lately is building new ones close to already developed areas. Tempers do flare at times!

We also seem to have an inordinate number of spills from manure containment areas into streams and this kills off a lot of fish. That one bothers me. Partially because of the fish kills, and partially because someone in government (that is paid handsomely to do so) is not inspecting these correctly and the owners aren't either.

The world is getting sillier and sillier each day, populations are growing, techno lifestyle has made this generation forget food/paper products, veggies, etc start on the land. I swear they believe those OJ commercials where you reach in and some person magically makes more OJ cartons appear.
if the US and world for that matter keeps sliding into a deeper recession, and God forbid another depression, our population will sadly dwindle, cuz so many dont know how to live without cell phones, gadjets, etc. They will die of starvation when they can no longer pull up to a mcdonalds or call up dominoes. they wont know how to cook when there is no more electricity or how to clothe themselves when there is no more malls.
its truly sad when city people looking for the "quiet country life" move out to the country and instantly change it into the city, by complaining about farms, wide open spaces, fresh air, yes i said it, FRESH AIR....you may think cow paddies stink but they dont stink half as bad as city smog and polution!!!
I for one am glad i was raised in the country, smells and all, im glad my mama took the time to teach me to sew, cook, all those life skills no one cares about anymore.
so cry over your favorite starbucks closing down, i know how to make a cup of joe in my coffee maker, cry when Krogers is out of milk, i;ll enjoy my fresh glass of bessie's(and the cream for butter later!)
cry when at thanksgiving your fancy organic market is out of skinny turkeys and fake cherry pie, i will be eaten away on my plump tom and juicy real cherry pie i grew myself and cooked.
cry when your dept store closed up, i can sew well enough to copy anything you'd have bought there anyways!!!
cry cry cry when my rooster wakes you up....just dont ask me for them fresh eggs my hens lay when your hungrey.
cry cry cry....i dont care, when the world ends, i will be dressed, fed and alive, while your munching in the ally on your latest gadget that isnt going to get you far!!
now, if you dont mind...i need to open a window and take in the fresh night air....bessie, porky and all
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Old 02-23-2009, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,040 posts, read 10,537,176 times
Reputation: 1932
Maybe we need a law stating that everyone must raise their own meat and vegetables for one year. Let's see how the city folk like having to do that (let alone how they would do so on those small lots), and see if they continue to complain about the farm operations they smell. That would also take the smell out of the country and move it into the city where most of the consumption takes place *bonus*. It would not take very long for city folk to realize why these operations are needed.

The primary reason for the smell is the large scale of the operation. It doesn't seem to be much of an issue when there's only one or two animals on a small rural ranch. Maybe if everyone lived that lifestyle, then there wouldn't really be any problems. Wishful thinking, huh?
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Old 02-25-2009, 09:24 PM
 
119 posts, read 378,183 times
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I live in an area that has quite a large Amish population. Several years ago one of the local towns passed a law requiring the Amish to put diapers on their carriage horses when they were on the street. This was because residents were complaining about going out to their mailboxes and stepping in horse manure. I have yet to see any carriage horses wearing Pampers, however.

As my daughter said when she was 3 years old: "Cows, they smell so FRESH!"
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Old 02-25-2009, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Liberty, KY
206 posts, read 1,050,973 times
Reputation: 222
I built my house right in the middle of a pasture... with COWS on it owned by an Amish man that lives down the street... we have an arrangement.. I love the smells of the "fresh air". Of course I also live in the middle of 60 acres in a little hollow... so nobody is going to be living next door to me. The properties surrounding me have been in their families for years, some are Amish.

Can't wait to be able to get my garden growing and some trees. Like Sweetasslady71, I can also cook and sew most anything and I can also thank my mother for that.
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Old 02-25-2009, 10:19 PM
 
5,654 posts, read 17,474,880 times
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I think that this is mainly addressing the large commercial pig farm problems. (I hope) I have heard that the smell carries for miles. Not even near where the houses are you can still smell it. In iowa it is a big controversy.
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Old 02-26-2009, 01:26 AM
 
Location: Way on the outskirts of LA LA land.
3,040 posts, read 10,537,176 times
Reputation: 1932
Quote:
Originally Posted by gardener34 View Post
I think that this is mainly addressing the large commercial pig farm problems. (I hope) I have heard that the smell carries for miles. Not even near where the houses are you can still smell it. In iowa it is a big controversy.
Some of the commercial poultry farms can smell pretty bad, too. In this day and age of buying everything in the supermarket, it goes with the territory. It used to be that folks raised their own food, whether it was poultry, pork, beef, dairy, or vegetables. Back then, no one seemed to mind the smell of the animals on the farm. Now everyone seems to want to be able to buy the food, but not accept the farm that produces it.
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Old 02-27-2009, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Democratic Peoples Republic of Redneckistan
11,102 posts, read 13,356,530 times
Reputation: 3926
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samantha S View Post
I grew up in a town surrounded by cattle ranches. A shift of the wind on a Summer day could carry quite a smell!

But that was the livelihood of a significant portion of the community!

If someone asked, "What's that smell???!"

The answer was, "That's MONEY!"
I have used that saying myself a zillion times
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Old 02-27-2009, 10:52 AM
 
22,779 posts, read 26,645,352 times
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This law doesn't appear to have anything to do with "Farms" in general. If you've got a pasture full of horses, cows, or whatever, I don't think that is a "Concentrated Feeding Operation."

This law appears to govern concentrated animal feeding operations, which are nasty places that can produce huge amounts of toxins in concentrated amounts. Like those 3-story buildings where they keep hogs in tiny pens, pump 'em full of steroids, and let their waste sit in open air lagoons.

I don't know why they chose to go after the 'smell', though. That seems like a minor issue. Here in Eastern North Carolina where I live, these things are a major environmental hazard.

Here's a good illustration of what happened to all those piggy farms during hurricane floyd.
http://www.riverlaw.us/hurricanefloyd.html

Last edited by le roi; 02-27-2009 at 11:36 AM..
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Old 02-27-2009, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Texas
43,998 posts, read 53,848,294 times
Reputation: 72244
I can see being responsible for your horses' poop if you're on public property. That's not fun for anyone else out there. If you have to pick up your dog's poop, why would it be appropriate to leave horse poop in the middle of the road.

That being said, I'm not a farmer, but I think farms should be farms. They are just trying to get business done. And there's actually something pleasant about the smell of an open pasture farm. It's the smell of hard work!

Those CAFOs need to go. That's frickin' horrific and inhumane.
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