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Old 04-04-2009, 09:06 PM
 
Location: NE Nebraska
84 posts, read 363,209 times
Reputation: 99

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
The problem is (at least where I live) that it is not just living next to a farm that is a problem. Since our dairy cow manure is our fertilizer, we have to truck that manure to the fields. With our farthest field being 35 miles away...there is no zoning that can prevent that. In a few weeks it will be "poop truck season" as my daughter calls it and the parade of trucks from the farm to the fields here will go on. That is the price we pay for fertile and highly organic soil unfortunately.
Wrong! In my county a person needs a Conditional use Permit from the County Planning Commission and the County Board of Commissioners prior to bringing in manure from outside the county to apply to fields in this county. In many rural areas with zoning you cannot apply manure in certain zoning districts, Rural Residential for instance even though you can farm in the district. Zoning can also control the distance manure can be from water, roads, houses, businesses, etc.
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Old 04-05-2009, 05:08 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,802 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by madpie View Post
Wrong! In my county a person needs a Conditional use Permit from the County Planning Commission and the County Board of Commissioners prior to bringing in manure from outside the county to apply to fields in this county. In many rural areas with zoning you cannot apply manure in certain zoning districts, Rural Residential for instance even though you can farm in the district. Zoning can also control the distance manure can be from water, roads, houses, businesses, etc.
That's silly.

Here we have a CNMP or Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan which covers all the environmental issues so that you are legally covered under the Right to Farm Act. In our case, you could have those zoning rules in place in any municipality, but because the CNMP covers such things as set-backs from water sources, property lines and importation across county lines (Not that we do that yet however), the CNMP is essentially a BMP (Best Management Practice) and supersedes any zoning laws.

The Right to Farm Act was passed with manure being its primary goal. As more development occurs it was apparent issues like you describe would come up and so Maine addressed it very quickly. I will admit however that our CNMP rules are VERY restrictive and are required on almost every farm no matter the number of animals. Technically it is 50 animal units, but if you get any help from the FSA or NRCS...you must get a CNMP as well. I have two...one for the crop land since it is imported manure, and one for my sheep even though I have very few of them.

Surprisingly, the Right to Farm Act was actually tested in Maine via Genetically Modified Corn Seed. A town we farm in passed a local ordnance banning it. The USDA stepped in and cited the Right to Farm Act and said a town had no right to deny farmers from using an approved method of farming. The towns people still passed the ordnance but they have no right to enforce it, so we drop the GM seed in the planters and head out across the field.

It is actually a sweeping piece of legislation that every state should have in my opinion. It is a great law because it does not give the farmer a right to do everything and anything they want to do, but since it is governed by BMP's then it allows them to farm and not be besieged with nuisance complaints.
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Old 04-05-2009, 05:21 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,802 times
Reputation: 1506
Another thing Maine has that is pretty cool is the Agricultural Mediation Service. Its a agency that is set up to mediate between farmers and others when there is a dispute. Its hoped that if they get involved it will keep things from going to court.

They actually have a broad scope of what they can get involved in. From a homeowner from away complaining about the smell of manure being spread on a field, to kids in a certain rural setting bullying other kids. The goal is to keep rural communities civil without resorting to lawyers and the court system. Truly no one wins what that happens.

I could have used it last year when I had some neighborhood kids crush down 40 acres of 2nd crop hay 2 days before we were to harvest it. The parents stood right on their porch and watched the kid do it which really really put a burr in my wool. I took care of the situation myself, and while I hate to go to that extreme, sometimes you do what you have to do. What I should have done instead is called the Agriculture Mediation Service in and had them mediate between us and that kids parents. As it stands now, my fields are safe, but my neighbors hate me and are confined to ½ an acre instead of the multi-mile playground they had before. It works I guess, but it probably could have worked out better.
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Old 05-21-2009, 12:28 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,391 times
Reputation: 10
Hello people. I completely agree with the part that diligence should be done before moving into a place... I mean.. the farm was there first!!

But anyway, if any of you would be interested, my friends and I have been using this organic-based product, initially to help lower ammonia levels in the chicken farm building... incidentally, it also eliminates the foul odor... people thought we already stopped operating the farm because they couldn't smell it!!

The product is so cheap we bought tons of it and sprayed it all over the place... flies were also deterred (probably went to the neighbors, hahaha jk).

Anyway, its simple, just spray it, even in the presence of chicken or pigs... and walah, no smell...
We do this once a week.

Oh and by the way, I am from Manila, Philippines halfway around the globe... and yes, we have the same problem with NOSY neighbors!!!

Maybe our product will work in your place too.
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Old 05-21-2009, 04:32 PM
 
Location: All around the world.....
2,886 posts, read 7,568,600 times
Reputation: 1049
This is the most asinine and selfish thing I've heard
Why would you move next to one in the first place? if you don't like the natural creation of things, move......
It's sickening how everything has to be so politically correct.
So how do you suppose they will eliminate every odor?? without posing a health risk
I assume some type of chemical would have to be used, to make a cow manure smell better?
Our food supply is already full of salmonella, and no telling what else..
I say when in Rome do as the Romans do..
or don't go there.
Just ranting my $.02
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Old 05-21-2009, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,965,025 times
Reputation: 4611
Quote:
Originally Posted by yhwhshalomjr View Post
This is the most asinine and selfish thing I've heard
Why would you move next to one in the first place? if you don't like the natural creation of things, move......
It's sickening how everything has to be so politically correct.
So how do you suppose they will eliminate every odor?? without posing a health risk
I assume some type of chemical would have to be used, to make a cow manure smell better?
Our food supply is already full of salmonella, and no telling what else..
I say when in Rome do as the Romans do..
or don't go there.
Just ranting my $.02
Your asking us?
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Old 05-21-2009, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,965,025 times
Reputation: 4611
Quote:
Originally Posted by yhwhshalomjr View Post
This is the most asinine and selfish thing I've heard
Why would you move next to one in the first place? if you don't like the natural creation of things, move......
It's sickening how everything has to be so politically correct.
So how do you suppose they will eliminate every odor?? without posing a health risk
I assume some type of chemical would have to be used, to make a cow manure smell better?
Our food supply is already full of salmonella, and no telling what else..
I say when in Rome do as the Romans do..
or don't go there.
Just ranting my $.02
In some cities there'a a limit to what kind and how much furtilizer you can use on your yard or garden
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