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Old 03-21-2009, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,141 posts, read 50,298,797 times
Reputation: 19839

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Commercial firewood producers stack their wood on a pallet. 4 foot by 4 foot by 4 foot tall. So it can be lifted by a forklift. It gets loaded into a kiln for two days of drying to make green wood into seasoned wood.

I get an industry trade journal and this week's issue is all about the kilns.
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Old 03-24-2009, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
4,118 posts, read 5,435,951 times
Reputation: 4831
I can see that most of the Wood Stove users have supplemental LP gas. Egads that stuff is expensive. I can really understand the need to have the option of a wood stove.

Smaller towns are beginning to adopt ordinances to help regulate the Outside Wood Burners. I've seen some of the right on top of neighboring homes. These short stacked burners are ok as long as no one is around them. That's not the case in city areas. For multi building heating these burners are excellent.

As much energy and thought process going into this type of savings, I would really like to see people putting some though into other renewable sources of energy, solar panels or wind turbines. It's getting so that one doesn't actually need a propeller driven wind turbine, they are now making them in other shapes and forms. Thermal heat from within the ground is another source to consider, especially for new construction.

Some of the Wood Burners are becoming more high tech with after burners and such. Not the same old wood stoves these days.
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Old 03-24-2009, 03:19 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,444 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
This is a very interesting and educational thread.

Here in Oklahoma, the name "Rique or Rick" is more commonly used instead of the name "Cord". A "Rick" is approx, 1/2 of a cord and is sold for approx, $55-$65.00.
While growing up on a Dairy farm in MI. I remember wr used a pot belly stove to heat with. The 180 acre farm we had was surrounded by woodland so we had all the (hard) wood we needed, which included some pine. I loved the smell of burning pine.
Are you sure you did not come from mid-coast Maine or something...you sound like my lost brother or something!!

As for a chainsaw issue, you are darn right I got a problem and thus far $30 bucks and a dealer cannot fix the problem. It's my small saw, a Husquvarna 246 which runs great until the saw gets warmed up. It is not over-revving, not under-revving, but cuts fine. But after a tankful of gas, it won't idle.

I took it to the dealer who thought the decompression button was stuck on it, but that was not the issue. Everything was tuned up, the air filter was cleaned and the saw was adjusted at the carburetor. The only thing I can think of is that the plug is shot (it looks good) or the gas tank breather tube is somehow plugged. Maybe its drawing a vacuum so that after a bit of running, it stalls out for lack of fuel? It does restart though as soon as you pull start it, so neither makes sense as being the culprit.
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Old 03-24-2009, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,957,890 times
Reputation: 4611
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
Are you sure you did not come from mid-coast Maine or something...you sound like my lost brother or something!!

As for a chainsaw issue, you are darn right I got a problem and thus far $30 bucks and a dealer cannot fix the problem. It's my small saw, a Husquvarna 246 which runs great until the saw gets warmed up. It is not over-revving, not under-revving, but cuts fine. But after a tankful of gas, it won't idle.

I took it to the dealer who thought the decompression button was stuck on it, but that was not the issue. Everything was tuned up, the air filter was cleaned and the saw was adjusted at the carburetor. The only thing I can think of is that the plug is shot (it looks good) or the gas tank breather tube is somehow plugged. Maybe its drawing a vacuum so that after a bit of running, it stalls out for lack of fuel? It does restart though as soon as you pull start it, so neither makes sense as being the culprit.
When you say it doen't idle, do you mean that the saw runs high or dies ?
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Old 03-24-2009, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,957,890 times
Reputation: 4611
BrokenTap.........You may be one of my brothers, 2 of my younger Brothers were running the Logging Business in Michigan. From what I've heard, there was some Family fued about 8-10 years ago, since then no one knows where one of the brothers are.

I couldn't be more serious................His name is Jeff
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Old 03-27-2009, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Portlandia "burbs"
10,234 posts, read 14,172,609 times
Reputation: 25899
We replaced our woodstove with a pellet-stove a few years ago, and I have to say that I like it better. BUT ~ I really miss the ability to cook a good stew on it when power goes out. It was a trade-off.
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Old 03-27-2009, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,141 posts, read 50,298,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesbabe View Post
We replaced our woodstove with a pellet-stove a few years ago, and I have to say that I like it better. BUT ~ I really miss the ability to cook a good stew on it when power goes out. It was a trade-off.
Our woodstove does not allow cooking either. At 200kBtu it is great for putting out heat, but no cooking.

B really wants a cookstove with oven, and bread warmer, and water heater. But our finances will not allow it.

We have made arrangements this summer to get a different stove from a neighbor, that should allow cooking. Then we may add an oven attachment for baking.
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Old 03-27-2009, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,734,179 times
Reputation: 3364
Lehman's has a folding, portable oven (http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID=2684&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainC at=950&iSubCat=868&iProductID=2684 - broken link)for woodstoves that's pretty handy. Not really big enough for a turkey, but I've done bread and a roast chicken in one.

They also have a guide (http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID=4053&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainC at=671&iSubCat=809&iProductID=4053 - broken link) for hooking up a generic waterfront/water jacket to any stove with a storage tank so that you can get domestic hotwater
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Old 03-27-2009, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,141 posts, read 50,298,797 times
Reputation: 19839
Thanks

We have copper tubing wrapped around the stove now making hot water.

Our last round of turkeys went from 38 pounds to 42 pounds each. Had a hard time selling them, a harder time trying to cook them. No, we plan on sticking to small turkeys from now on.

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Old 04-01-2009, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,178 posts, read 9,534,807 times
Reputation: 9580
Default HELP on draft question

I have a question on woodburning stove draft. We have a small stove that heats 1700 sq feet of home wonderfully well on just a few small logs; it is very efficient. Fire it up, damper it down, and we are warm all night and even into the next morning. Except... except when the wind blows more than 30 mph from the north. Then the smoke pours back down the chimney. The woodstove is placed in an addition to the house on the ground floor, on the NW corner of the room. The pipe extends upward about 8 feet from its roof. Directly to the east and abt 10 feet away from the pipe is the flat wall of our second story. I consider that the wind direction and 2nd story wall is causing some of the problem, but am not sure.

Needless to say whenever we have severe winter weather, the wind is always more than 30 mph from the north, which kind of eliminates the whole - 'in worst weather we'll have heat' theory!! Anyone have any ideas on how to fix the problem? We've been told to "build a HOT and fast burning fire" to overcome this but it doesn't work.
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