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Old 04-01-2009, 08:31 AM
 
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Yea I heat with wood.



hillman
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Old 04-01-2009, 09:39 AM
 
Location: On the plateau, TN
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SCGranny, IMOH.... I see a problem of draft. Is the cap screen and stovepipe clean, raise the pipe, burn a hotter fire. Maybe a different design of cap.....
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Old 04-01-2009, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
I have a question on woodburning stove draft. We have a small stove that heats 1700 sq feet of home wonderfully well on just a few small logs; it is very efficient. Fire it up, damper it down, and we are warm all night and even into the next morning. Except... except when the wind blows more than 30 mph from the north. Then the smoke pours back down the chimney. The woodstove is placed in an addition to the house on the ground floor, on the NW corner of the room. The pipe extends upward about 8 feet from its roof. Directly to the east and abt 10 feet away from the pipe is the flat wall of our second story. I consider that the wind direction and 2nd story wall is causing some of the problem, but am not sure.

Needless to say whenever we have severe winter weather, the wind is always more than 30 mph from the north, which kind of eliminates the whole - 'in worst weather we'll have heat' theory!! Anyone have any ideas on how to fix the problem? We've been told to "build a HOT and fast burning fire" to overcome this but it doesn't work.
It sounds like your cap is scooping the wind.

It should give a venturi effect instead.

The cap is likely wrong. I have heard that rising it taller would help too.
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:40 AM
 
11,257 posts, read 44,321,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
I have a question on woodburning stove draft. We have a small stove that heats 1700 sq feet of home wonderfully well on just a few small logs; it is very efficient. Fire it up, damper it down, and we are warm all night and even into the next morning. Except... except when the wind blows more than 30 mph from the north. Then the smoke pours back down the chimney. The woodstove is placed in an addition to the house on the ground floor, on the NW corner of the room. The pipe extends upward about 8 feet from its roof. Directly to the east and abt 10 feet away from the pipe is the flat wall of our second story. I consider that the wind direction and 2nd story wall is causing some of the problem, but am not sure.

Needless to say whenever we have severe winter weather, the wind is always more than 30 mph from the north, which kind of eliminates the whole - 'in worst weather we'll have heat' theory!! Anyone have any ideas on how to fix the problem? We've been told to "build a HOT and fast burning fire" to overcome this but it doesn't work.
We had an identical problem with our wood cookstove drawing properly when the winds got over 30 mph here in SE Wyoming ... which could be frequently during the winter months.

Our stove and stack was properly installed per the manufacturer's (Waterford) instructions for diameter and height. It was all properly installed per code requirements re adjacent roof, and trees and other obstacles around the house.

We visited with many stove retailers and manufacturers, followed their advice, and were not able to "fix" the problem. I got lectured by many as to all their years of experience and all the factory woodstove classes they'd attended ... and all of their advice was wrong.

The solution came from a Woodstove store in Laramie, WY. They have a "windbeater" cap which replaced the top portion cap of the Simpson triple wall stack we'd installed (that replaced the older double-wall stack, which we'd been told was a problem). The "windbeater" cap has no moving parts, it's just a series of panels that serves to create a positive draft in the stack. Made of stainless steel, it's pretty sturdy. Once I had the Simpson top cap off the stack, it took only a couple minutes to remove the original top plate and replace it with the windbeater unit and install with 4 screws that came out of the Simpson cap.

The cost was $150, which seemed expensive for what it was ... but it's solved our high wind downdraft problem completely. It's so effective at creating a draft in high winds that we have to almost completely shut our flue damper and air intake on the sealed firebox because it pulls so much air through the firebox.

If you can't find the "windbeater" chimney cap at your local woodstove supplier ... and many don't seem to know about this item ... Call "high country stove & chimneys" in Laramie, 800-557-4488. The lady who owns and runs the place knows what she's talking about, unlike most folks in this business.
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Old 04-01-2009, 12:33 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
I have a question on woodburning stove draft. We have a small stove that heats 1700 sq feet of home wonderfully well on just a few small logs; it is very efficient. Fire it up, damper it down, and we are warm all night and even into the next morning. Except... except when the wind blows more than 30 mph from the north. Then the smoke pours back down the chimney. The woodstove is placed in an addition to the house on the ground floor, on the NW corner of the room. The pipe extends upward about 8 feet from its roof. Directly to the east and abt 10 feet away from the pipe is the flat wall of our second story. I consider that the wind direction and 2nd story wall is causing some of the problem, but am not sure.

Needless to say whenever we have severe winter weather, the wind is always more than 30 mph from the north, which kind of eliminates the whole - 'in worst weather we'll have heat' theory!! Anyone have any ideas on how to fix the problem? We've been told to "build a HOT and fast burning fire" to overcome this but it doesn't work.
I think you answered your own question. Here in Maine the rule of thumb is to be 2 feet above anything within 10 feet of the chimney. If you have a structure within 8 feet of your chimney...then that is your culprit. You need to extend your chimney up.
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Old 04-01-2009, 01:41 PM
 
11,257 posts, read 44,321,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
I think you answered your own question. Here in Maine the rule of thumb is to be 2 feet above anything within 10 feet of the chimney. If you have a structure within 8 feet of your chimney...then that is your culprit. You need to extend your chimney up.
This response, like a number of others, ignores the posting that the adjacent surface is 10' away, and doesn't require the height of the stack to be 2' taller. That original 10' radius, 2' higher spec for fire safety came from the era of open woodburning fireplace designs, where there's a lot more airflow (and mostly unregulated) that can take sparks up a chimney and onto a roof ... and is quite different from the burning characteristics of sealed firebox heating stoves, which only allow the amount of airflow to support the combustion and little more so they deliver heat efficiently into the adjacent room rather than put it up the chimney.

In fact, we found out the hard way that extending the stack taller than that needed for a normal draft under NORMAL wind conditions was detrimental to the flow because the flue gases got colder as they rose and created less draft in the adverse wind conditions.

In our regional climate ... that of the poster and ours here in SE Wyoming ... the greater factor is the dynamics of the airflow around the house at the level of the stove and the temperatures involved. In very strong winds and gusts, this is what causes the house to "go negative" and pull airflow back down the stack and the firebox, and into the room.

We heard all about "higher stack" being "the fix" in our case, and tried it ... first with the double wall stack, then with the triple wall stack. In each attempt, it made the problem much worse, and the negative airflow started at even lower wind speeds, forcing us to reduce the stack height to the suggested height by the stove manufacturer of 15' above the stovetop.

As the poster has indicated normal stove operation and burning satisfactorially at typical windspeeds, the stack is most likely quite appropriate for the stove. The problem comes with a specific wind direction and above certain windspeeds. That's when the dynamics of the airflow are creating the problem for them, and a normal raincap on the stack doesn't help create a draft. By changing over to a more appropriate cap, the poster will be able to create a draft with the increasing wind speeds.

Simpson/DuraVent used to make a drafting cap, but it had a rotating element in it which would soot up and stop rotating, and was difficult to clean out. Until is quit rotating, it worked very effectively in these high wind situations. But due to that problem of keeping it clean and functional, Simpson has pulled it from the market. At least it our regional marketplace, Simpson is the largest ... in many cases, the only ... supplier of woodstove stack pieces. Since they don't list the drafting cap anymore, most retailers don't know about using one. We were persistent enough about finding a solution to our woodstove stack problem to find a supplier with an alternative, and it works.
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Old 04-02-2009, 02:50 PM
 
4,249 posts, read 8,253,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
Lehman's has a folding, portable oven (http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID=2684&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainC at=950&iSubCat=868&iProductID=2684 - broken link)for woodstoves that's pretty handy. Not really big enough for a turkey, but I've done bread and a roast chicken in one.

They also have a guide (http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID=4053&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainC at=671&iSubCat=809&iProductID=4053 - broken link) for hooking up a generic waterfront/water jacket to any stove with a storage tank so that you can get domestic hotwater
(why can't I rep if I've been spreading a lot???)

The portable oven is a great idea until we are ready to splurge for a real country woodstove with built-in oven. They have some country woodstoves on Lehmans, too, but - ouch! - $6K ??? They sell them here for around $1000 ???

Hot water off woodstove is a great idea, too.
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Old 04-02-2009, 03:27 PM
 
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That's a cheap, simple solution - barrel stove.

Lehman's - Products for Simple, Self-sufficient Living (http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID=199&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCa t=671&iSubCat=737&iProductID=199 - broken link)
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Old 04-02-2009, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
That's a cheap, simple solution - barrel stove.
I got my parts from NorthernTools, for about the same price.

I get the barrels free at a local twinky factory, food grade.

Been using it for three years.

Rated at 200kBtu. It burns wood, peat and coal just fine.

I lined the bottom barrel with refractory cement, so it takes the heat very nicely and has not shown any signs of burning through.

The upper barrel I gave some air intakes, so it can work as a secondary combustion chamber.

Also I wrapped the upper barrel with copper tubing and we use it to heat water for our radiant floor loop.

It is a cheap woodstove that throws out a lot of heat. Folks have been telling me that it would burn through after one year. I have a huge stack of replacement barrels standing by if it ever does burn through. We are now finishing our third heating season with it.

I do not have any honest idea of how many years they will last.

Maybe if you were somewhere that got really cold, it would burn through faster. I just don't know. That back end will glow cherry red just about every night.
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Old 04-02-2009, 04:58 PM
 
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This barrel stove will probably be good for maple syrup making, since it gets hot fast. (with some flat sheet welded on top to hold pans). This year, our first year of ever trying maple syrup making, we just used an old cast iron (beautifully wrought though) woodstove that took forever to heat the panful of sap on top. We did it outside, so naturally lots of heat was lost, but still that should have been working faster. It's a vertically elongated woodstove, as opposite to the horizontal barrel.
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