U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-14-2009, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,141 posts, read 50,298,797 times
Reputation: 19839

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
Thanks for the good advice! The library sounds like a nice alternative to church. I'm religious, but I'm not really a church lady. I also like the idea of having the surveyor tie strings around the trees to mark the property line as well.
To my knowledge on the East Coast, and the West coast of USA, they shave a section of each tree's bark and paint it orange. As you stand on the property line, and look through the forest, trees that are to the right of the line will have a shaved mark on their left. Trees on the left of the line will have a shaved mark on their right. And trees that sit on the line will be marked dead center.

Then at each Corner, their will be a permanent marker. Not a tree. That marker could be:
a. a 4 inch by 4 inch post 3 foot tall in the ground painted red,
b. a steel spike driven in the ground with a flat head engraved with details of the property,
c. a large 'X' carved into a bolder.

Each of these would be marking the exact spot of the corner.

I have seen survey markers of each type.

If it has been surveyed in the past 100 years, it should already have each corner marked.

And if it was surveyed within the past 50 years the lines should be marked.

Anyone moving a mark is violating law.

If there is any doubt about your property lines; either the seller or the realtor should offer to walk the lines with you. I have walked lines with realtors before. It is not uncommon.

Rarely stateside will you find a property that 'needs' to be re-surveyed.

With the deed in hand. I have paced out lines before, to find over-grown surveyor markers [on previous properties that I have owned]. It is not difficult. Once you find the first marker, the rest are much easier.



Also around here the Grange is active as a social group. The Masonic lodge, Elks, and K of C are all nice fraternities.

When I moved here I attended the local lodge meetings, the VFW, the American Legion, and I joined the local Farmer's Market as a vendor, and quickly I got to know a lot of the locals.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-15-2009, 02:18 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
Reputation: 8170
Every state has different laws about trespassing.

Where I live, ag land does not need to be posted as it is assumed-----"NO TRESPASSING"

non-ag land ( woods that isn't a livestock pasture) MUST be posted and it specifies EXACTLY in what manner.

Even on posted land, you have to catch the person in your woods once and give a VERBAL warning.

The 2nd time he enters posted land, he can be prosecuted.

As I stated, laws on trespassing vary greatly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2009, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Heart of the San Joaquin
350 posts, read 1,022,701 times
Reputation: 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
I am thinking about buying a tiny house with 50+ acres in the middle of nowhere. Other than getting a gun and some dogs, I'm not sure how else to prepare. I grew up in a rural area outside the US and to tell the truth, I'm planning to be extra cautious because I think a lot of Americans have guns. So pls don't take offense to that since I am a woman and I value my safety. I have some questions, though:

1. How do I demarcate the property line? Should I get a survey and then post no trespassing signs? In my country if you trespass on someone's property and they don't know you, the owner will set their dog on you or run after you with a sharp object in an attempt to... well, kill you.

2. If I don't have a mortgage, can I live on $1000 a month?

3. How do I greet people after I buy the house? Do I have to start attending church? I don't feel comfortable going up to stranger's houses to say "Hi!" Should I send cards or call and say hey my name is whatever, I just bought the house down the road?

Obviously I want fresh air and p&q. I also want to hike and swim naked and dry my clothes outside and generally do whatever I want without having close neighbors to judge or harass me. Nevertheless, I don't hunt, and I don't relish the thought of any hunters "accidentally" happening on my land. How do I handle that stuff?

In the area I'm considering, there are few crimes, but most of the crimes seem to be burglaries done by scary-looking dudes. With my luck they will probably pick my hut to burglarize. How can I protect myself against that type of stuff without being overly paranoid?
50 acres in the middle of nowhere? Heaven! If I were busting out on my own like that, I'd definitely have some protection.
Fences are good, deadbolts good, locking windows good, dogs, peacocks, goats & mules are good watch animals. I'd probably install an alarm system where a loud alarm would sound if anyone broke in. A loud, shrill noice would deter most, I think. Also, a panic button and maybe a safe room.

I'd go to your nearest neighbors and introduce yourself as a new neighbor, take them some brownies, give them your phone number and ask for their number in case of emergency. Can't hurt to break the ice.

What an adventure. Good luck.

Last edited by momojojo; 03-17-2009 at 01:09 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2009, 02:34 PM
 
Location: North Cackelacky....in the hills.
19,556 posts, read 19,538,457 times
Reputation: 2499
We are relocating to 17 acres and a barn not quite in the middle of nowhere(although it feels like it when you are up there) and we have a gate on the driveway,we have firearms with us when up there(never needed them but it never hurts either) and locks.

Locks and gates keep honest people honest,they do little to stop criminals.

We have yet to decide to run around naked but honestly we could if we wanted to....although running into some of the briars while unclothed could be damaging...

Good luck and remember( as we try to do) that you only live once and life quickly slips away from you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2009, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,734,179 times
Reputation: 3364
I just bought large acreage out in the middle of nowhere which had been surveyed about 6 years ago so you can still see where the trees were cut by the crew... this may not be as simple if the property was surveyed a long time ago. The property corners are marked with monuments - either metal "mushroom" posts that are at ground level or by marking a tree (some monument trees have metal plaques on them), and others are stone caches. Each state is different, especially if the survey is old, but there will be a monument marker of some sort at all the corners of a surveyed parcel.

If the owner or realtor doesn't know where the property markers are, go the local land office/registrar and look up the plat map for your parcel and go walk them yourself with the map. When you're at the registrar's office, have them run a property/title search to check that the parcel has been properly surveyed, recorded and has a clear deed/title (you don't want to buy land that has liens on it or strange easements or restrictions). Do not play fast and loose with a land purchase, no matter how good the deal sounds or who is pressuring you. That is how people end up buying non-legal parcels or the wrong parcel entirely, or surrounded by trees and water they aren't allowed to use (yes, there are easements and restrictions that say the seller or someone else still has resource rights and you don't). Check everything carefully.

Fences are a good demarcation, but 50 acres is a lot of fence and that will inhibit a lot of wildlife movement. If you keep the property line clear of trees and brush and post "Private Property" or "No Trespassing" signs on the remaining trees every 100 feet or so (or you could tie ribbons on or paint the trees) that should be enough for demarcation purposes. Keep in mind that many states have a 10-25 foot public right-of-way easement along the boundary of your property, so be careful if you do decide to put up fences. Get a small portion of fence and a good gate for your driveway or any other access trail on your property (unless it is a public easement) to keep random people from using them.

Check the trespassing and hunting laws in your state because they are all different. Some states are really lax with trespass laws so you probably wouldn't want move to one of those -- look for states that absolve the property owner of any damages that may occur to a trespasser (like having your dog take a chunk out of them) and find out exactly what actions you're allowed against a trespasser (do you have to call the Police or can you shoot them, under what circumstances and with what force can you protect yourself, etc). Most states will allow a hunter free entry onto your property without permission if he is pursing an already wounded animal, once the animal is killed and secured they must leave your property; but they are not allowed to actually hunt on your property without your permission.

If you don't have a mortgage or any other debt, your property taxes are low, and you grow/raise most of your own food then living on $1000 a month is very doable. Health/Property/Auto Insurance will take a big bite out of any budget, so keep that in mind when you're doing your figures. Also, utilities like gas, electric, water/sewer, telephone and cable/satellite (TV or Internet) should also be factored in as appropriate. And don't forget about maintenance on the home, fences, vehicles etc. I'm not trying to scare you, but you need to be realistic about what that $1k has to be spent on and plan accordingly.

If your place is like any smaller town I've ever lived in, the neighbors will all flock to you within the first week or so after you buy the house. You're the new kid and everyone will want to come meet you and take your measure. The best place to make your presence known is at the local market or the post office... in a few days everyone will know you're there!

Getting a couple of large, well-trained guard dogs is a good idea. Check with the local police to see if they can recommend a good kennel and trainer in your area. I stress getting trained dogs, because they have a lesser chance of accidentally harming someone than your regular territorial dog might. I'd also recommend strong door locks and lockable shutters for your windows... definitely lock your doors whether you think you need to or not, and lock the shutters if you have to be away from home for an extended period of time. This will help with wildlife damage as well as theft and vandalism. If you don't want a lot of weapons around and aren't going to spend a lot of time keeping your marksmanship up, I would suggest that you get a shotgun for self-defense. Shotguns are excellent for close-in defense because they do a lot of damage to your target without having to be as precise with aiming and such like you would with a rifle or pistol. They also do less collateral damage if you need to fire it inside your house. If you're unfamiliar with firearms, most law enforcement and hunting/wildlife agencies offer firearm safety classes for free or cheap as well as other self-defense and wilderness training.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2009, 11:43 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,679,656 times
Reputation: 8170
Missing says-------" keep in mind that many states have 10-25 ft public -easements-right-of way easements along the boundary of your property ----

which states ?

In my state , that is an old urban legend that the DNR has to debunk constantly cuz people still believe it cuz "somebody" ( who didn't have a clue) told them so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2009, 11:44 AM
 
Location: The Woods
17,088 posts, read 22,602,664 times
Reputation: 9373
Get a map or copy of any surveys done on the property, you can double check with a GPS where the corners/etc. are. Surveys aren't always necessary since most land has already been surveyed at some point. Now if there's any dispute with neighbors over boundaries then a survey can be useful...

What state is this anyways? If you want a firearm, or to post your land, and so forth, you really need to know the state laws...in some states you can shoot trespassers on sight, others, you'd be charged with murder...now even in a state where you could I wouldn't go shooting people simply for trespassing unless they are threatening, refuse to leave, etc. In some states there are specific requirements for size of signs, wording, placement, etc., for it to be legitimate as posted land. In some states hunters can access your land even if posted for the purpose of getting a wounded animal, in others they can't.

I would have a title company do a title search, and I would insist it goes all the way back to any original land patents or grants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2009, 11:48 AM
 
Location: The Woods
17,088 posts, read 22,602,664 times
Reputation: 9373
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Missing says-------" keep in mind that many states have 10-25 ft public -easements-right-of way easements along the boundary of your property ----

which states ?

In my state , that is an old urban legend that the DNR has to debunk constantly cuz people still believe it cuz "somebody" ( who didn't have a clue) told them so.
Alaska for one. My property is like that, easements on the edges strictly for access to neighboring lands, done to prevent access to lands from being lost...so when I post some signs I'm going to include a bit of wording making it clear that the signs don't prohibit lawful/authorized uses on those easements, but any illegal use of those easements or going beyond the boundaries of them constitutes trespassing...I've got a nice sign I got from landrights.com that I edited to make it more applicable to Alaska (state law requires the signs to be fairly specific about what's not allowed) and will print out and laminate copies of (along with another page attached underneath it forming one large sign with both my address and mailing address as state law requires those addresses and for the sign to be at least 144 square inches).

Edited to add: here's my sign:
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2009, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,734,179 times
Reputation: 3364
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
Missing says-------" keep in mind that many states have 10-25 ft public -easements-right-of way easements along the boundary of your property ----

which states ?

In my state , that is an old urban legend that the DNR has to debunk constantly cuz people still believe it cuz "somebody" ( who didn't have a clue) told them so.
It depends on how things were set up when the parcels were initially divided and subdivided. Your property description should have any boundary easements clearly indicated on the deed. I have found this type of easement in VA, MD, PA, SC, NC, TX, CO, WA, OR, ID, and AK... but not on every parcel, so you have to check the easements on the recorded deed yourself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2009, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,734,179 times
Reputation: 3364
Sweet sign Arctic! I'd run it past an AK lawyer, but I think you have to actually spell out each thing you consider trespass... so the language "including, but not limited to" might not hold up in court.

I thought that Alaska is one of those states that allows hunters to pursue a wounded animal or their dog/livestock onto your property without permission for the purposes of retrieval... but I can't find where I read that now (please correct me and point me to the statute if you have it). Don't know if you want to expressly state that as an exemption on your sign or not... but I wouldn't want to **** off the locals or leave a wounded animal to suffer!

I agree that you want to restrict access to your property from law enforcement, ADF&G and government agents/officials without a warrant... but you might want to put an exemption in there about EMS or Fire-Fighters which are there to save your life or property.

(Hope you don't charge me land use if one of my goats escapes and wanders on to your property )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:06 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top