U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-02-2009, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,965,025 times
Reputation: 4611

Advertisements

LGD's ??? That's something I'm not familiar with. Could someone explain them?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-02-2009, 12:32 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,802 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
LGD's ??? That's something I'm not familiar with. Could someone explain them?
Livestock Guard Dog.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2009, 12:38 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,802 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistyriverranch View Post
We have two Great Pyrenees (LGD's) guarding our sheep and horses here in wolf, cougar, bear and coyote country and they do a fantastic job.

They don't have to chase. Just the fact of them being there has kept the predators away looking for better prospects. The predators started staying away when the dogs were pups marking their territory and kenneled at night.
They do wander. We have no close neighbors and are surrounded by national forest so we have no problems with their wandering.
They also bark at night. A lot. Not good for relationships with nearby neighbors.
We've never lost a lamb or any other animal here to predation because of the LGD's.
5 Horses: How come you can't keep LGD's with deer? If brought up with them, LGD's will usually guard anything.
Always good to see you over on this forum MistyRiver. I no longer go over to Backwoods Home but I enjoyed your posts over there, and on occasion over here.

I know of a Shepard that has some LGD's and it seems to me she has a lot of problems with them. She raises them to sell so that is maybe why she does not try something else, but so far when she has coyote issues, she adds another dog. I think she is up to 9 dogs now guarding 200 sheep.

I have never seen her farm so maybe it is something else, but at some point I think I would try another predator deterrent rather then just throwing more and more ineffective dogs at the problem. I am not slurring the use of dogs...they probably work, but you must realize too that if you are losing sheep, and constantly adding dogs at some point you should back up and say, "Maybe I need to try something else".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2009, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,965,025 times
Reputation: 4611
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
Livestock Guard Dog.
Thank You...I knew it was something like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2009, 11:04 PM
 
1,688 posts, read 7,048,639 times
Reputation: 1992
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistyriverranch View Post
5 Horses: How come you can't keep LGD's with deer? If brought up with them, LGD's will usually guard anything.
Therein lies the rub.

My deer are not penned or in any way confined - aside from limiting their area by way of a fence, they are otherwise free roaming on a decent size piece of land. Because of this, there's no way I could raise the pups with the deer. My own dogs (totally non-LGD breeds) have learned the deer are uber off limits and they'll stand politely and in a non-threatening stance when we all go feed dinner.... so, as much as they've learned deer are not on the "we are not allowed to chase with intent" list, unfortunately there's no guarding instinct there. Pity really, but such is life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
but you must realize too that if you are losing sheep, and constantly adding dogs at some point you should back up and say, "Maybe I need to try something else".
I could not agree with you more with regards to the sentiment that, obviously, something is not working. But as a perpetual student of canine behavior and training, it sounds suspiciously like to a broken link in the chain of training. It could also be the bloodlines are not proving sound. It happens. But no, just throwing more dogs at the problem is not going to be an answer if the question itself hasn't been addressed in the first place.

Last edited by FiveHorses; 04-03-2009 at 12:14 AM.. Reason: omitted word
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2009, 03:26 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,802 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveHorses View Post
I could not agree with you more with regards to the sentiment that, obviously, something is not working. But as a perpetual student of canine behavior and training, it sounds suspiciously like to a broken link in the chain of training. It could also be the bloodlines are not proving sound. It happens. But no, just throwing more dogs at the problem is not going to be an answer if the question itself hasn't been addressed in the first place.
I think it is one of those things, for those that use dogs they grow to love them and would use nothing but. For those that use Donkey's or Llama's they are proud of using them and would using nothing but. Myself, I am pretty happy now with letting the sheep graze duding the day and letting them in the barn at night. BUT at some point I will have too start grazing across the road and bringing a flock of sheep back and forth would not be good. When I get to that point, I'll need something to watch over the sheep at night.

I was told a dog does a better job at night time protection then a donkey...but how much better??? Anyone's guess. Because hunting is a way of life for many of the neighbors here, I think a donkey will do.

I think the the toughest job about getting the right match of LGD or protection is matching the hunting, trapping, fencing, guard animal to the farm itself. You have so many choices...either get really good fencing and subtract a few dogs...have lousy fencing and hunt like crazy...hunt like crazy and have good fencing but no LGD's...well you get the idea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2009, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 14,200,833 times
Reputation: 32950
Llamas can be used to guard stock from coyotes. A friend in Montana has a llama guarding his goats.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2009, 09:24 AM
 
1,688 posts, read 7,048,639 times
Reputation: 1992
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
BUT at some point I will have too start grazing across the road and bringing a flock of sheep back and forth would not be good.
Ah sure... you should have said. You don't need a LGD... you need a pair of borders or Aussie sheps to herd them for you!

I have lived in two countries where the sheep population significantly outnumbers the humans. Not too many traffic lights, but plenty of moving flocks that legally have the right of way. I never tire of watching working dogs work.

I think the debate of LGD vs. hunting vs. other guardian livestock vs. fencing is one of those that just goes around and around in circles - and one to which there is no "right" answer. At the end of the day it's just going to come down to the individual's personal preference and what works best in that individual's particular situation.

Still, it's something I love talking about!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2009, 02:54 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,158,802 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveHorses View Post
Ah sure... you should have said. You don't need a LGD... you need a pair of borders or Aussie sheps to herd them for you!

I have lived in two countries where the sheep population significantly outnumbers the humans. Not too many traffic lights, but plenty of moving flocks that legally have the right of way. I never tire of watching working dogs work.

I think the debate of LGD vs. hunting vs. other guardian livestock vs. fencing is one of those that just goes around and around in circles - and one to which there is no "right" answer. At the end of the day it's just going to come down to the individual's personal preference and what works best in that individual's particular situation.

Still, it's something I love talking about!
We will be friends then, because I agree so much. Depends where you live. But you missed the herding dogs we already have...Corgi's! A lot of people do not believe these small dogs can herd, but can they ever. The do it by nipping at the ankles of cows. As the cows kick, the small size of the dog, and the trajectory of the kick makes the hoof miss the dog.

On one of the 3 dairy farms in the family, these dogs out do a fence. We could never keep the heifers out of this one area, and every time the dogs saw the cows were out, they ran out and herded them back in. Because this farm is on the end of a dirt road, we decided to let the dogs keep the cows in all summer. They loved it.

As for the donkey, I will let you in on the REAL reason I want a Donkey. I figure it will be the only way I can brag to everyone in town, "My wife has a really nice a$$"! (and not lie about it)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2009, 02:20 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 16,965,025 times
Reputation: 4611
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
We will be friends then, because I agree so much. Depends where you live. But you missed the herding dogs we already have...Corgi's! A lot of people do not believe these small dogs can herd, but can they ever. The do it by nipping at the ankles of cows. As the cows kick, the small size of the dog, and the trajectory of the kick makes the hoof miss the dog.

On one of the 3 dairy farms in the family, these dogs out do a fence. We could never keep the heifers out of this one area, and every time the dogs saw the cows were out, they ran out and herded them back in. Because this farm is on the end of a dirt road, we decided to let the dogs keep the cows in all summer. They loved it.

As for the donkey, I will let you in on the REAL reason I want a Donkey. I figure it will be the only way I can brag to everyone in town, "My wife has a really nice a$$"! (and not lie about it)
I've been out of the Dairy sceen for quite some time. I've never heard of using Donkies or Llama's for guarding. Our pastures were surrounded by acres of woodland. Inside that was fencing. Some electric. I don't recall having a problem with coyotes, maybe a fox once in awhile. I do remember finding fox holes. It seems that the climates in Maine and Michigan would be closely alike.
Maybe I'm wrong there.
Wouldn't guard animals be needed more in areas with more open range?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:26 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top