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Old 04-05-2009, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
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Small towns typically have VERY few people in their 20s, with the exception of college towns. How many people here are in your 20s and living in a small town thats NOT a college town? How do you like it? Do you ever wish you lived in a more urban area?
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Old 04-05-2009, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Boardman, OH
602 posts, read 1,791,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Small towns typically have VERY few people in their 20s, with the exception of college towns. How many people here are in your 20s and living in a small town thats NOT a college town? How do you like it? Do you ever wish you lived in a more urban area?
To me, it all depends on the town. I used to live in a small town. There was a small college there, but it was NOT a "college town", (there is a difference). Even though, I grew up in a small town, I didn't like this particular town. While, it was quaint, it was filled with a lot of weird people. Everyone either seemed to be a Jesus Freak or so insanely Liberal it wasn't even funny.
Right now, I live in a medium-sized city and I like it a lot.
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Old 04-05-2009, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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I lived and worked in a small town that was not a college town from age 24 to age 30.

It was my hometown, although I had moved away at 18 for college, and went and worked in a very large urban area before coming back for a job opportunity. There were incredibly few twentysomethings there, and the few that there were were not college educated, because there were incredibly few jobs in a community that size that were suitable for college-educated people. What few jobs there were were laborer jobs in manufacturing and agricultural processing. So it didn't really attract young people looking for non-blue collar work, for the most part. I had one of the few degree-requiring jobs available to a recent grad (newspaper reporter and editor). It just didn't offer much, professionally, for people starting out their professional lives, so accordingly, it didn't attract that age group. It WAS a popular enough place for young families to come because it has a "nice place to raise a family" vibe going on, can be very idyllic and white picket fence, kids can play at the park safely, neighbors have grill-outs, everyone goes to the country fair, etc. But not so much for twentysomethings, unless they were ones with young families. The few there were were mainly of the "married right out of high school" stripe.

I loved it, but my loving it was colored by several things - one, it was my hometown, which I'd always loved (no "I've just GOTTA get out of town!!!!" mentality for me when I was a teen, like so many experienced). And being a local made my job as a reporter immeasurably easier, due to the trust factor. Second, my family, to whom I'm very emotionally close, was there, and this was a huge added benefit - also a few childhood friends who'd lingered, and those were nice connections to have. Third, as a local, I came into the situation knowing that dating options would be nil, and mentally prepping for the reality that if I wanted to date, I'd probably have to widen the net to include more not-so-local options, because the local options were essentially nonexistent. So that didn't come as a shock when it played out that way, I'd come in expecting it. Fourth, I HAD lived in an extremely urban area previously, so there was no "Gee, I wonder what it'd be like to live in a big city instead of here," wonderment. I already knew.

I did enjoy being there, but I don't know that I'd have enjoyed a town of the same size that I hadn't had the hometown connection with, and I don't know that I'd have enjoyed it so much had I not had family, etc. at my disposal in the area. If I were a twentysomething plunked somewhere that size where I knew nobody at all, it would have been a different story, because the social options and outlets weren't very conducive to having much social contact.
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Old 04-07-2009, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
17,032 posts, read 27,225,299 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I lived and worked in a small town that was not a college town from age 24 to age 30.

It was my hometown, although I had moved away at 18 for college, and went and worked in a very large urban area before coming back for a job opportunity. There were incredibly few twentysomethings there, and the few that there were were not college educated, because there were incredibly few jobs in a community that size that were suitable for college-educated people. What few jobs there were were laborer jobs in manufacturing and agricultural processing. So it didn't really attract young people looking for non-blue collar work, for the most part. I had one of the few degree-requiring jobs available to a recent grad (newspaper reporter and editor). It just didn't offer much, professionally, for people starting out their professional lives, so accordingly, it didn't attract that age group. It WAS a popular enough place for young families to come because it has a "nice place to raise a family" vibe going on, can be very idyllic and white picket fence, kids can play at the park safely, neighbors have grill-outs, everyone goes to the country fair, etc. But not so much for twentysomethings, unless they were ones with young families. The few there were were mainly of the "married right out of high school" stripe.

I loved it, but my loving it was colored by several things - one, it was my hometown, which I'd always loved (no "I've just GOTTA get out of town!!!!" mentality for me when I was a teen, like so many experienced). And being a local made my job as a reporter immeasurably easier, due to the trust factor. Second, my family, to whom I'm very emotionally close, was there, and this was a huge added benefit - also a few childhood friends who'd lingered, and those were nice connections to have. Third, as a local, I came into the situation knowing that dating options would be nil, and mentally prepping for the reality that if I wanted to date, I'd probably have to widen the net to include more not-so-local options, because the local options were essentially nonexistent. So that didn't come as a shock when it played out that way, I'd come in expecting it. Fourth, I HAD lived in an extremely urban area previously, so there was no "Gee, I wonder what it'd be like to live in a big city instead of here," wonderment. I already knew.

I did enjoy being there, but I don't know that I'd have enjoyed a town of the same size that I hadn't had the hometown connection with, and I don't know that I'd have enjoyed it so much had I not had family, etc. at my disposal in the area. If I were a twentysomething plunked somewhere that size where I knew nobody at all, it would have been a different story, because the social options and outlets weren't very conducive to having much social contact.
I have lived in smaller areas (<50000) that were not my hometown, as a college graduate worrking at a local industrial facility. In a city this size, there are the women that graduate high school and marry their sweetheart, who usually works at the local plant in operations or maintenance. The other women go away to college. Whats left are single moms, divorcees, and floaters (women who dont know what to do w their life). Being a single 'outsider' is not fun for dating in these areas. Granted many 'church ladies' are willing to set you up with their daughters/nieces if you are 'management'. But they are usually women who are looking for a mealticket or a chance to get out of town w/o going to school. One tends to drink more often.
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Old 04-07-2009, 07:37 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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I had to rep on the drinking. It made me laugh at the end of a singularly unfunny day.
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Old 04-08-2009, 12:49 PM
 
4,259 posts, read 9,881,562 times
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Originally Posted by Oildog View Post
I have lived in smaller areas (<50000) that were not my hometown, as a college graduate worrking at a local industrial facility. In a city this size, there are the women that graduate high school and marry their sweetheart, who usually works at the local plant in operations or maintenance. The other women go away to college. Whats left are single moms, divorcees, and floaters (women who dont know what to do w their life). Being a single 'outsider' is not fun for dating in these areas.
I experienced this living as a young engineer in a 400,000 population metro in the Midwest. The women there would either marry their high school sweetheart at 20 or move to Chicago. If they didn't fit into either of those categories they were, like, 300# or something.

As far as the drinking, one evening I got a bottle of MD 20/20 at the Super Target. I had 2/3 of the bottle and thought, "hey, this is pretty good!" Fortunately at that point I realized what I was thinking, drained the rest of the bottle down the sink, and never had another.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oildog View Post
Granted many 'church ladies' are willing to set you up with their daughters/nieces if you are 'management'. But they are usually women who are looking for a mealticket or a chance to get out of town w/o going to school.
After leaving the Midwest I wound up with a gig traveling to small towns in Pennsylvania's Appalachian region. I remember meeting with a borough official at lunch who excused herself briefly after hearing that I was single (at that time) and within half an hour her niece (complete with bratty six-year-old son) had shown up to meet me. As far as the town was concerned, the lady had mentioned that when she does her laundry, her son one block down has suds in his well water within 20 minutes. Guess one can understand the motivation for a ticket out of town.
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Old 04-09-2009, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oildog View Post
In a city this size, there are the women that graduate high school and marry their sweetheart, who usually works at the local plant in operations or maintenance. The other women go away to college. Whats left are single moms, divorcees, and floaters (women who dont know what to do w their life).
...And people like me, from age 24-30. I WAS one of the "women who went away to college." I just came back to start my career in a place I knew and knew well. Not a single mom, not married to a local blue collar laborer, not divorced, not a floater or remotely unsure of what I was doing in my life, not a person looking for a meal ticket in any regard, and not somebody inexperienced in living in other settings (I'd lived not only in urban areas, but also overseas previous to moving to town). Oh, and also not 300#.

Just a single college graduate, starting out my professional life in an affordable town where I had connections. For a time, I often wondered if I was being overlooked on the dating scene due to guys of the mentality that I MUST be one of the above things, simply by virtue of the fact that I was living in a small town. Then I realized that if they were going to make assumptions about me like that, they themselves weren't really dating material (truth be known, I'd MUCH rather date one of the blue collars than anybody who rather condescendingly looked down on what they erroneously assumed my backstory must be). You know what they say about assumptions...
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Old 04-11-2009, 08:45 PM
 
Location: NEPA
42 posts, read 83,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Small towns typically have VERY few people in their 20s, with the exception of college towns. How many people here are in your 20s and living in a small town thats NOT a college town? How do you like it? Do you ever wish you lived in a more urban area?
I'm in my early 20s and am living in a small non-college town. It sucks and I'm looking forward to moving whenever I decide where to go.
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Old 04-12-2009, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,222,222 times
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Originally Posted by dancingbear View Post
I'm in my early 20s and am living in a small non-college town. It sucks and I'm looking forward to moving whenever I decide where to go.
Yeah I hear you. Do you have a college degree? I graduated in 2007 and am waiting out the bad economy and then am going to make my move. For now I have a pretty secure job so I can't complain but I could be making more than twice as much money doing the same thing in a big city AND I would have the added benefit of actually having things to do besides sit at my apartment and watch TV and maybe not being single the rest of my life.
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Old 04-12-2009, 08:24 PM
 
Location: NEPA
42 posts, read 83,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Yeah I hear you. Do you have a college degree? I graduated in 2007 and am waiting out the bad economy and then am going to make my move. For now I have a pretty secure job so I can't complain but I could be making more than twice as much money doing the same thing in a big city AND I would have the added benefit of actually having things to do besides sit at my apartment and watch TV and maybe not being single the rest of my life.
This is my fourth and last year in undergrad, but I won't be finishing with a degree. I hear you too on the lack of activities in a small town.. although I'm now leaning towards moving to a more rural area as opposed to a metro area. What I desire the most right now is more trees and less concrete.
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