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Old 08-30-2009, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
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You don't say what part of the country your farm is in. I had the same problem here in NE GA and was fortunate that I live near some chicken farmers...they came and spread chick poo for the cost of the gas and it raised my levels and really firtalized my fields
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Old 08-30-2009, 07:17 PM
 
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????????????

poultry manure is a great fertilizer, but I fail to see how it raises the ph of your soil.

The farmers near me who rely on poultry manure as a major part of their fertilizer program, still apply lime to raise the ph.

Fertility levels and soil ph are not the same and usually what is used for one does nothing for the other.
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Old 09-01-2009, 05:45 PM
 
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You are right Marmac (as usual) my understanding is that it is high in ammonia which means the nitrogen level is really high, but does not do much for your PH levels. That is why it takes your breath away when you shovel it. Man is that stuff raw compared to cow manure. Sheep manure is high too in nitrogen.
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Old 09-02-2009, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Around here the chicken litter is composted. The dead chickens are tossed into the compost, so there could be a small amount of calcium and stuff from the bones that would affect pH?
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Old 09-02-2009, 11:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Around here the chicken litter is composted. The dead chickens are tossed into the compost, so there could be a small amount of calcium and stuff from the bones that would affect pH?
True, but when it takes a ton per acre of actual lime to raise the soil ph .1 , I fail to see how a few chicken bones could make much difference.
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Old 09-02-2009, 11:11 AM
 
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We have a neighbor who has a hard time growing good alfalfa due to a low ph.

He says he doesn't need to apply extra lime cuz every day he runs the barn cleaner and 2 ( 66 lb )bags of lime are used on the center aisle of his dairy barn.

The center aisle is scraped daily into the gutter and transfered mixed with the manure via the barn cleaner.

Doing the math-------that is 132 lbs of lime, applying 10 loads of manure per acre gives him 1,320 lbs of actual lime applied.

Yup, his soils are still deficent in lime cuz he rotates crops and they only get applied once every 3 years.

Even if he was able to not "lose" ph over the years( which he will), it would take him 45 years to go from a 5.5 ph tp a 6.5 ph test.
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Old 09-02-2009, 05:23 PM
 
Location: NOCO
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I wonder if theres any bioremidiation that can be done. Planting something that will pull the Ph up. How long ago was it that your land was converted from forest? Pine forest creates its own acidic soil to help it outcompete other species. Do you know much about your soil profile and how it's leaching? How far back do you have records of soil analysis? How is your ph changing over time?
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Old 09-03-2009, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
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As I said, it depends on what area of the country you live in and what type of soil you have. I live in NE GA red clay country and the Chick poo worked for my soil type.
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Old 09-03-2009, 05:22 PM
 
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What was the soil test ph before you applied poultry manure?
What was the soil test ph after applying poultry manure ?
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Old 09-05-2009, 06:04 AM
 
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Land is always trying to go back to the way it naturally was. Since I live in Maine and this land was cleared in the 1800's, its been fields for a long time, but it is still trying to go back to its acidic state. It has low PH and always will...the best I can do as a farmer is to input lime to get the crops that I want to grow...to grow.

The other factor is the coal fired power plants in the midwest pumping volumes of acid rain into the sky. Due to the jet stream and our topography, it lands here which also ups our ph levels. Our wetlands have done an excellent job of filtering this ph out, but just as with a cars filter, when you don't change them they clog up and no longer filter. That is where we are today. We have pumped so much acid rain in the sky for so long that they are no longer filtering out the acid.

We do grow alfalfa here, but for me its not really worth it. We have two issues to deal with...the low PH factor and the winter-hardiness of alfalfa. As long as you plant it on the leeward side of a hill, there is enough snow cover from drifting to protect the alfalfa from being killed by the cold. That saves the alfalfa from winter kill, but low PH is always a factor. I think a mix of clovers and fescue makes a better mix, but that is just my opinion.

But while it seems farming here is silly, when it comes to pastures Maine and Vermont have the best pastures in the world. It has to do with rainfall, topography, temperatures, etc. We just have to figure out how to get a decent crop in for the livestock when the pastures go dormant in the winter.
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