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Old 06-11-2009, 09:18 AM
 
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I have had no trouble whatsoever with the fiberglas posts in wind gusts up to 70 mph.
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Old 06-11-2009, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
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Thanks, guys - I knew there had to be a simple algebraic formula for figuring usage, it just seems that people who have been doing it so long know it and don't even think about it! Sorta like firefighting, with the pump pressure loss formula - once you do it for awhile, you don't even think about it.

Marmac, all information is useful, and at least gives me a starting point for figuring. I've actually never seen the fiberglas step-in posts even for sale around here, but we use the readily-available metal ones for our snow fencing. We sock them into the ground with a sliding hammer. Still, in this sand, they are fairly easily removed. So I am still thinking... I heard about rotational grazing using a stationary water tank, and just separating the pasture at angles that all include the stationary tank. This gives me more info.

Glad you joined the discussion with your experience, sunsprit! And thank you.
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Old 06-11-2009, 10:21 AM
 
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Many publications recommend the water centrally located and access from all paddocks.

I never liked that idea.

A water stock tank, in one location, soon becomes a mudhole from cattle using that spot every day ( if the area is not concrete)

Maybe with a smaller number of cattle and drier weather ( Nebraska) you wouldn't have the problem as we would where I live.
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Old 06-11-2009, 10:42 AM
 
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You are right Marmac it is easy to keep cows in, but sheep...forget it. But that is what nicks my sheep. The Gov pays you a flat rate for fencing at $2.07 per linear foot. Us poor sheep farmers burn every penny of that up and then maybe more, while good ole cattle farmers toss up one strand and pocket the other $1.75 they make...
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Old 06-11-2009, 11:05 AM
 
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I was unaware of cost sharing.

Every dollar spent on rotational grazing came from my checkbook.
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Old 06-11-2009, 03:39 PM
 
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Yeah you can cost share fencing provided it has one of three potential issues:

1. You are protecting a natural water resource like ponds, streams, wetlands, etc

2. You are using it as interior fences for rotational grazing

3. You have older fences that were used for livestock but they are now unusable, but still located on the farm



My problem is, the fences I have work fine, until the grass gets grazed down to a certain depth or a certain amount of time lapses by.Then it seems the sheep get ansy or just bored and move on to greener pastures, no matter if the fence is between them. It does not help either that I have some pretty good fields they are adjacent to and yet they cannot be grazed until a couple crops of grass silage is taken of them. That makes for some pretty good temptations on the sheep's part. So the only real way to control them is to put up really good fences (page wire) and hold them in that way.

The funny thing is, if you have been reading fence catalogs for awhile you will remember when HT came out and it was supposed to cure all your fencing needs. The sheep and goat owners soon found out that did not work. And then poly wire came out and that was supposed to be the greatest thing since sliced bread, but that ended up falling short too. Now they are billing a combination of barb wire, page wire and HT as the answer to sheep farmer's concerns. ???

Maybe with the NRCS, we'll figure something out at some point.
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Old 06-11-2009, 03:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
I heard about rotational grazing using a stationary water tank, and just separating the pasture at angles that all include the stationary tank.
Marmac is right when it comes to the water tank...the more you move it, the better off you are as it spreads the manure out more...and guess what is also in manure...grass seed like clover and fescue because the stomach of cattle and sheep do not harm it. In fact when we spread liquid manure, you can tell where the trucks went last year because there is a ribbon of clover in the field. In your case you poition the water tank near the bare spots and soon you have:

1: Organic matter building up in bare areas of soil
2. Grass seed sprouting

Now you can do this with hay too if you feed outside. Just put the bales on the bare spots and over the winter the refused hay and poo collects in the bare spots. Organic matter builds up, so does fertilizer and its being seeded in.
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