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Old 02-28-2012, 05:22 PM
 
789 posts, read 568,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houseshunter View Post
Have you checked out wyoming? They have very little taxes, which makes it appealing for both businesses and homeowners. You will save a fortune if you move there and, if you have kids, their school systems are very well funded (oil).
Parts of WY are less expensive. Be sure to check for water rights and potability if the land has any water. It isn't cheap to live here, though. Several things increase the COL.
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Old 03-03-2012, 06:13 PM
 
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Does the OP mean warmer than PA all year? A lot of the places mentioned are quite cold in the winter, the Dakotas, the Midwest, Wyoming.
If OP works from home online, do remember that internet access varies and is not necessarily available or isn't optimal or reliable in "isolated" areas.
Anywhere arid (as someone pointed out about Wyoming) learn about water rights. Double if you're looking at Colorado, although I doubt the weather there would be an attraction.
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Old 04-22-2012, 08:45 AM
 
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Middle states like SD, NE, OK etc. but, really who wants to move there though. Prefer pacific northwest or quaint new England villages, but it's expensive.
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Old 04-22-2012, 11:03 AM
 
Location: southwest Nebraska and northwest Kansas
2,094 posts, read 2,656,510 times
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Yeah, and because no one wants to move here, we have luxuries like SPACE, a clear night's sky, and an great appreciation of our neighbors because we're further apart.

So far as cheap, yep. We bought our 40 acres a couple of years ago for $16,000. Total.
And there are those who think we got honked, paying $400 an acre.
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Old 04-22-2012, 04:43 PM
 
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I think it rude (never mind wrong) to say that "no one" wants to live in certain Midwestern states. That is certainly not true.
I wince whenever someone refers to "flyover" country. Although I've largely always lived on the East Coast, I'd rather not think that I and the West Coast are the centers of the universe.
I realized my own unconscious bias when I started vacationing at a guest ranch in Colorado in 1988. Most of the guests and all of the college-age staff were Midwestern, specifically, the Iowa university in Ames. I kind of was startled at hearing a twang (however mild) from people who seemed very smart and solid, and realized that I had subconsciously had the same ignorant view of the Midwest. I was often the only East Coast person there. Seems East Coasters don't go to Colorado to ride. When I took a friend out there with me, she'd been to Europe a few times, and to California, but never anything in between, not even for the scenery.
I am interested in people who are smart and down-to-earth and don't have an attitude about their wonderful selves, and that's how I perceived Midwesterners.
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Old 04-25-2012, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,812 posts, read 7,294,086 times
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Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Arkansas, Missouri are my suggestions.
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Old 04-25-2012, 03:50 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
7,930 posts, read 7,539,925 times
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One thing to consider about the Midwest, farm land is booming in prices. Much land is sold at auction for cash ! They just do not make any more of it, Land is always a good investment.Of taxes are a problem on large parcels, then look into land trusts,within family or Donations, leases, timber harvesting etc. many people in very rural places can be property poor. Someday it always pays off, but you may not live that long. Just remember wherever you go, if the land has a return potential for crops, it will be expensive. Much of the properties in Iowa, Ill, OH, Neb, some MO, some SD south Mn. are potential buys for large farmers as well as corporate groups, large acreages are whats wanted always. As far as living in these Midwestern places, it can be like the Great Plains, cold windy winters, very hot sticky summers. Good places to grow crops, not people.
Up here in upper Michigan , away from the cities, you can buy some real cheap properties. If you are lucky enough to be near a lake winters are not that cold, but lots of snow, which is nice, with very warm sunshine, very intense for some reason.There is still frontier land here , not found anywhere else outside of Alaska. I live in Marquette, been here 4 years and never saw the temps below 0. ,yet down in Wisconsin, its much colder, with high taxes,. The idea of finding a warm place to live interests a lot of people., especially if you are not so remote that commutation services do not exists. If I were looking ( have in the past done this) , I would look in summer resort places where there are lots of services and well healed people to rub shoulders with. Makes for a much happier lifestyle.The key in these high dollar places, is to find properties just outside of the trade area, but not so far as to be remote with out electricity, etc. That way you have the best of both worlds, with very few people in the winter. Parts of Western NC can fit this bill, low taxes along with some real estate if you look long and hard enough can be a good deal. After all hho wants to live in a place that no one would ever consider living there, , there IS a reason.
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Old 04-25-2012, 04:09 PM
 
Location: southwest Nebraska and northwest Kansas
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Quote:
Good places to grow crops, not people.
Interesting.
My observation has always been that most places that are good for growing crops are also good for growing people.
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Old 04-25-2012, 07:24 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
7,930 posts, read 7,539,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Interesting.
My observation has always been that most places that are good for growing crops are also good for growing people.
And you are right! .However I am always giving my opioin that the Great Plains and adjoining places in the Midwest also have the greatest extremes in climate. That's an established fact as well from my own experience ,as I grew up in the cornfields in Iowa.Very cold winters,very hot humid summers. sure makes that corn grow fast !
The area we are discussing is the bread basket of North America, which starts in Texas and continues north into Canada.Not the most pleasant weather wise to live. Never mind the dust storms, and twisters.. My choice to move to less harsh environment was my own. Obviously many feel otherwise, it's a good thing, someone needs to produce all the food we all eat....and still, we having starving children all over the Country.that's another issue, and clearly off topic. Ever wonder why the cities and temperate areas seem to attract the majority of people ?
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Old 04-26-2012, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Stillwater, Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreggB View Post
This is true--somewhat caused by the exodus of those from Ca. I suggest New Mexico, possibly Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma as well!!
College towns in Oklahoma are nice and not as backward as some other Oklahoma towns.

Here is a panoramic view of one of the larger college towns in Oklahoma. Oklahoma State University takes up the left 1/3 of the picture. Downtown Stillwater and industrial plants are on the right. Click for a closer view:



Currious about the current weather in Stillwater? Go to Stillwater Weather - Rain or Shine?

Last edited by StillwaterTownie; 04-26-2012 at 01:48 PM..
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