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Old 06-02-2009, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,711 posts, read 45,808,859 times
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I really like Carlton chain and the filing plate that can be used with it. Helps me get the chain more consistently sharp, if you know what you are doing and are sharpening often enough to stay in practice, you can probably do fine by eye, but I really like that "File-O-Plate".

Like any other quality cutting tool, I have found I have to DIY to get any sort of decent edge, and of course the shops all want to use some sort of power grinder that can build up enough heat to damage the cutting implement.
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Old 06-02-2009, 03:31 PM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
I really like Carlton chain and the filing plate that can be used with it. Helps me get the chain more consistently sharp, if you know what you are doing and are sharpening often enough to stay in practice, you can probably do fine by eye, but I really like that "File-O-Plate".

Like any other quality cutting tool, I have found I have to DIY to get any sort of decent edge, and of course the shops all want to use some sort of power grinder that can build up enough heat to damage the cutting implement.
I agree with you. My dad uses that and he gets a good edge. Nothing wrong with getting a little help. A sharp chainsaw is really a safety issue as you will only get fatigued with a dull saw.
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Old 06-03-2009, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Airports all over the world
6,271 posts, read 6,433,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
I really like Carlton chain and the filing plate that can be used with it. Helps me get the chain more consistently sharp, if you know what you are doing and are sharpening often enough to stay in practice, you can probably do fine by eye, but I really like that "File-O-Plate".

Like any other quality cutting tool, I have found I have to DIY to get any sort of decent edge, and of course the shops all want to use some sort of power grinder that can build up enough heat to damage the cutting implement.
While I agree that power grinders can cause heat damage to the chain, if properly maintained and operated, they will not cause heat damage. Years ago I use to work in a small engine shop. I sharpened many thousands of chains. I never received any complaints regarding the quality of the sharpening. We used a seperate grinder for doing the rakers. We had different size stones for different size teeth. We had tools for dressing and cleaning the stones. Our grinders were professional quality. We would also replace broken teeth, links, and drivers.

The Carlton guide is quite good. However I disagree on one thing. Unless you only use your saw a couple times a year, I would recommend using a solid bar over a laminated bar period. The cost is not that much more and the product is much better.

Something that never ceased to amaze me was peoples love affair with the absolute longest bar they could put on the saw.
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Old 06-03-2009, 08:23 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,262,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
Saw chains sold today all have "anti kickback" links.
New saws come with them, but you can buy chains that do not have the kickback links, and the chain will cut must faster. anti kickback are great for arborists and for use on pruning saws.
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Old 06-04-2009, 06:07 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaskan Mutt View Post
Something that never ceased to amaze me was peoples love affair with the absolute longest bar they could put on the saw.
I think that is a advertising issue. You always see the length of the bar stressed pretty hard. Of course the shorter the bar, the more hp you are putting on the chain because the saw does not have to drag so much chain, so much farther.

That being said, I do like a longer bar for a few things. You can cut wood up without bending over quite so much, but felling is where it really excels. I use the open face notch when felling so having a proper hinge is critical for me. A longer bar really ensures that hinge is perfect. You get that by get a straight back cut, and the longer the bar, the easier it is to get those big trees felled. For me, the bigger trees are the ones you want to really fell perfectly too!

Of course being a rather advanced logger (I am a certified logger) I use advanced felling techniques as well, so I plunge cut a lot. By using the plunge cut and back strap method, you can pound a few wedges in and get that tree that is leaning backwards to topple in the opposite direction of the lean. That comes in handy now and then as they say you spend 15% of your time felling, and 60% of your time yarding the tree out. If you can spend a few extra minutes felling right, and make that tree land where yarding it out is so much easier, you really are being productive. To plunge cut though, you better have a pretty big bar to bore through the center of those trees. It's not for the faint of heart either.

What I am trying to say is, unless you fell a lot, the shorter bar should work just fine. In particular firewooding where you are hogging through wood one after another. getting that extra power is really needed. Felling though...a longer bar really comes in handy. I change bar lengths as my needs dictate. I generally run and 18" but have everything from 18" on up to 32".
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Old 06-04-2009, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Airports all over the world
6,271 posts, read 6,433,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
I think that is a advertising issue. You always see the length of the bar stressed pretty hard. Of course the shorter the bar, the more hp you are putting on the chain because the saw does not have to drag so much chain, so much farther.

That being said, I do like a longer bar for a few things. You can cut wood up without bending over quite so much, but felling is where it really excels. I use the open face notch when felling so having a proper hinge is critical for me. A longer bar really ensures that hinge is perfect. You get that by get a straight back cut, and the longer the bar, the easier it is to get those big trees felled. For me, the bigger trees are the ones you want to really fell perfectly too!

Of course being a rather advanced logger (I am a certified logger) I use advanced felling techniques as well, so I plunge cut a lot. By using the plunge cut and back strap method, you can pound a few wedges in and get that tree that is leaning backwards to topple in the opposite direction of the lean. That comes in handy now and then as they say you spend 15% of your time felling, and 60% of your time yarding the tree out. If you can spend a few extra minutes felling right, and make that tree land where yarding it out is so much easier, you really are being productive. To plunge cut though, you better have a pretty big bar to bore through the center of those trees. It's not for the faint of heart either.

What I am trying to say is, unless you fell a lot, the shorter bar should work just fine. In particular firewooding where you are hogging through wood one after another. getting that extra power is really needed. Felling though...a longer bar really comes in handy. I change bar lengths as my needs dictate. I generally run and 18" but have everything from 18" on up to 32".
Where I worked there was no commercial logging. It is probably safe to say 99 percent of the customers I delt with had no training other than maybe reading the instruction manual that came with the saw. Most of the time people were cutting up trees the state had dropped to create a moose habitat. On average we are talking about 8 inch birch. The trees were usually in a big mess of a pile. More often than not you could only use the last 10 inches of your bar or you would be jamming the tip into another tree. The people with 24 inch bars were having to work a lot harded than the ones using a 16 inch bar.

I always got a chuckle when I saw someone in a department store trying to sell a customer a saw. Often both the clerk and the customer had no knowledge of chainsaws. The only information displayed about the saw would be the bar lenght. I took a lot of saws on trade-in that had been bought at department stores.
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Old 06-04-2009, 11:00 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,157,444 times
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Oh yeah, you see in big print "20" bar", and I am thinking wow, a 3hp saw running a 20 inch bar would be WAYYYYY underpowered.

I should state again that plunge cutting a tree off the stump can be very dangerous. You really should know what you are doing as using the tip can really kick. (To someone else's credit, they mentioned this quite a few posts ago,) With plunge cutting, you cannot get away from it, but it is pretty cool, cutting a tree off the stump by driving the saw into the heart of the tree first and then bringing the saw from the inside to the outside.
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Old 06-06-2009, 10:10 PM
 
Location: In a van, down by the river.... LOL
21,338 posts, read 7,586,584 times
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Tap, my first hubby and I had a tree/landscape biz here on the Cape for 10 years together. I've sharpened thousands of chains in my day. lol We had a sharpener from Foley Belsaw. We would buy the chain by the spool and make our own. You can google them to see their equipment... you prolly already know. lol But I thought I'd mention it just in case.
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Old 05-31-2019, 01:29 AM
 
1 posts, read 104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrokenTap View Post
I am looking at getting a new saw this year and was thinking about upgrading to the MS 660 Stihl Saw. Anyone got one and like it?

I really love the 460 so I am hesitant to upgrade, but with my new filing method, I could use the extra CC's to get an even bigger chip.
I recently bought the 460. Would you help me to find the best sharpener for it . I was thinking of buying from these <a href="https://www.2kreviews.com/best-chainsaw-sharpener/">options</a> .Which would be best?

Last edited by badalley; 05-31-2019 at 01:32 AM.. Reason: Wrote url /url
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Old 05-31-2019, 05:46 AM
 
40,189 posts, read 41,790,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
im not an expert but i have found that dirt is fatal to a sharp chain.

Dirt, rocks or anything else that wood will quickly dull it. Running it dull exacerbates the issue because the cutting edge will begin to round over and the longer you run it dull the more you round it over. When you go to sharpen it or have it sharpened you need to remove a lot of metal.


When you know you have sharp chain observe the size of the chips. When they start getting smaller it's time to sharpen it.
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