U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-13-2010, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
16,162 posts, read 21,104,454 times
Reputation: 8340

Advertisements

They all sold their land in Lancaster County PA to developers for big profits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-14-2010, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
Reputation: 19849
Each generation needs to move out and find fresh land to begin farming. It makes sense to me.

We have at least three Anabaptist communities that have recently moved in to this area.

Cheap rural land draws them, as it did me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2010, 09:40 AM
 
Location: cemetary
363 posts, read 906,249 times
Reputation: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by alamosakid View Post
We have a huge underground aquifer, as, based on your assertiveness, you should have already known
Well he wouldn't know since he's from Wyo, but I do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2010, 12:26 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,683,788 times
Reputation: 8170
Quote:
Originally Posted by plainsman48 View Post
Sorry that's lie #1. The state has water rights and does not own the rainwater.



Amish chickens, much like those raised and sold by the Hutterite, are ground scratchers - not penned. They are larger than store bought, taste better and command higher prices. The turkeys are the BEST

Lie #2 - Pennsylvania food registration is the toughest in the 50 states. Amish products like milk and cheese have that certification - it's guaranteed the best! Amish farms receive a dispensation from the Bishop to provide pasteurization for the milk. It's heated and rapidly cooled before the truck arrives to pick it up. So, only dairies have the electric lines in.

Observation 1 - puppy mills - there are dozens in every major city that aren't owned/operated by Amish or Mennonites. Go pick on them. What the Amish do with their animals is what we should all do - use them as the good Lord intended - as farm animals - plowing fields and herding sheep. We do not make them our friends.

Observation 2 - Dairy farms have a problem with offal and sewage - what to do with it. Unlike homes, they can't exactly put it into a treatment facility or septic tank, therefore you'll see this at ALL dairy farms - a huge lagoon of waste, sometimes covered with 6mm plastic sheeting and auto tires on top to keep it from blowing off or allowing insects inside. In Fla, the dairy farms at the top end of Lake Okeechobee have been polluting the lake for decades. The bentonite prepared lagoons are the only way of reducing the smell and subsequent overflow into the groundwater, thus keeping the public from dysentary and other diseases. The states enforce the environmental controls, so if you see a leaking lagoon, it is your duty to report it to the proper officials. Failing that, tell the property owner whether you know them or not. Fines are staggering and yes, even the Amish pay those fines.

I grew up with Amish, Mennonite and Hutterite farm kids so what I'm telling you is the truth. My wife was Amish before we were married. I keep the traditions alive for my grand-children, tho I am not one.
regarding Observation 2-----------I have seen lots of huge packed piles of corn sileage and haylage covered in plastic and held in place with tires.

Thus, those piles contain dairy cattle feed.

I have never seen manure piles covered in plastic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2010, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
Reputation: 19849
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
regarding Observation 2-----------I have seen lots of huge packed piles of corn sileage and haylage covered in plastic and held in place with tires.

Thus, those piles contain dairy cattle feed.

I have never seen manure piles covered in plastic.
I agree.

Quote:
... Dairy farms have a problem with offal and sewage - what to do with it. Unlike homes, they can't exactly put it into a treatment facility or septic tank, therefore you'll see this at ALL dairy farms - a huge lagoon of waste, sometimes covered with 6mm plastic sheeting and auto tires on top to keep it from blowing off or allowing insects inside. In Fla, the dairy farms at the top end of Lake Okeechobee have been polluting the lake for decades. The bentonite prepared lagoons are the only way of reducing the smell and subsequent overflow into the groundwater, thus keeping the public from dysentary and other diseases. The states enforce the environmental controls, so if you see a leaking lagoon, it is your duty to report it to the proper officials. Failing that, tell the property owner whether you know them or not. Fines are staggering and yes, even the Amish pay those fines.
I have never seen such a thing.

Sileage yes.

Manure? no.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2010, 04:55 PM
 
Location: cemetary
363 posts, read 906,249 times
Reputation: 209
Geez you must live sheltered lives

Healthy Landscapes: How To Manage Manure

Answers.com - Why do is see cow manure piles covered with used tires in the country

Manure Disposal
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2010, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
31,146 posts, read 50,314,105 times
Reputation: 19849
So rather than selling it, or giving this valuable nutrient away. They store it?

I see many dairies, and have not seen manure stored in such a manner.

I have seen manure in piles where they were harvesting methane for tractor fuel though.

Where I grew up covered piles were always sileage. And now around here it is sileage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2010, 07:02 PM
 
Location: cemetary
363 posts, read 906,249 times
Reputation: 209
They store it and use the methane gas to power the barns. We rarely covered our hay or alfalfa in Colo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2010, 08:42 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,683,788 times
Reputation: 8170
The vast majority of farms use the animal manure as fertilizer for fertilizing fields that grow crops,

Here in Minnesota ( lots of dairy farms) you need a feedlot permit.
The higher cattle numbers on your permit, the more stringent the requirements.
On the permit application you must have listed enough acres ( either owned or proof of manure spreading rights) to cover the amount of cattle in the permit.

A couiple weeks ago I drove past a 2,000 cow dairy ( 10 miles from me) and they were emptying the liquid manure pit. A hose went across his field, under a state hwy, across another field and under I-94 , to a field where the hose was connected to a an applicator with shanks that was injecting the manure into a field where corn sileage was harvested.

With 2 pumps, they were able to pump that manure 5 miles away to a field.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2010, 08:47 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,683,788 times
Reputation: 8170
Quote:
Originally Posted by plainsman48 View Post
They store it and use the methane gas to power the barns. We rarely covered our hay or alfalfa in Colo.
apples to oranges ( comparing storing alfalfa sileage and storing dry, baled, alfalfa hay )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Rural and Small Town Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:26 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top